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A new video about making gun carriages


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After seeing what Michael in Santa Monica has done with his Vasa I am a bit ashamed to publish this new video, but here it is any way.

 

I wanted to make 16 guns that are only 6 pounders for my next project.
They are very small, but here I try to show how I went about this.

Oh, you might turn up the sound for this.

 

They are not yet finished, need new barrels, etc.

Edited by Modeler12
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Hi Jay!

 

Thank you for a wonderful video tutorial!  Haha you should not be embarrassed at all!

 

Although I don't have your tools, it really was a learning experience to see them in action thank you.  However, I did learn some really helpful tips from something as simple (but useful) as labeling my drill sizes, to your clamping method with the peg and the board (what a great idea) and how you made the eye bolts was just so clever and easy.

 

Thank you again!  You really have helped me :)

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Jay -

Thank you for sharing your skill and expertise in this video.  I learned a lot that will help me in assembling and fitting out the cannons for my FAIR AMERICAN.  I have been puzzling over how to make the small rings and eye bolts on the sides of the cannon carriages, and you nicely solved this for me.

Well done.

 

<<Gary>>

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  • 3 weeks later...

Nicely done video. Might I suggest using brass wire for the eye and ringbolts rather than steel, though? Then there is no danger of rusting.

I used the steel wire because it was very thin (0.010 inch). After making the twisted eye, I blackened them which should protect them from any rusting. The rings were actually made of brass.

Since then I have found copper and brass wire at the very thin gauges. But, again, I am not really that concerned.

Thanks for those comments, my friends.

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  • 1 year later...

Great video, Jay. Two small tips for novice machinists:

 

1. If you want to turn wood down to a very small diameter use an oversized piece of wood in the headstock and only work on small lengths (perhaps 1") at a time. The minimizes deflection. 

 

2. When parting off small, repetitive pieces with a drilled out center (such as cannon wheels) insert a length of thin wire down the center with plenty of overhang. The wheel will stay on the wire when parted as opposed to flying across the workshop.

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Great video, Jay. Two small tips for novice machinists:

 

1. If you want to turn wood down to a very small diameter use an oversized piece of wood in the headstock and only work on small lengths (perhaps 1") at a time. The minimizes deflection. 

 

2. When parting off small, repetitive pieces with a drilled out center (such as cannon wheels) insert a length of thin wire down the center with plenty of overhang. The wheel will stay on the wire when parted as opposed to flying across the workshop.

 

Is the wire connected to anything or just sticking out of the wood with the hole drilled in it? Sounds like a really good idea.

 

Thanks

Greg H.

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  • 1 month later...

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