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Found 39 results

  1. Hello, after the warm welcome in this forum and the interest on a build log of the "Amerigo Vespucci", I will start it now. As you may know it is an Italien sail training ship which was originally build 1931. The model bases on the Mantua-Kit, which I tried to optimize according to pictures of the real Ship. I started to build the model in 1994, but just shortly after the begin, I had to disturb the building due to job, wife, house building, kids, ... A few years ago I restarted building the model again. Some data: Mantua Kit scale 1:84 length 1,25m hight 0,75m In a german forum I have already started a build log of this ship a few months ago. Therefore, first I will present as an overview also the steps which I have done since this time. Unfortunately, I have got no pictures from the earlier steps, so I will start with a mostly ready body of the ship and show you first some detail pictures. Hope, you enjoy it. Best regards, Joachim
  2. Un po' per curiosità, un po' per passione condivisa con tante persone, provo ad aprire questo wip su questo sito, (non so se la scrittura in italiano, l' unica lingua che conosco "abbastanza" bene, provocherà dei problemi per comunicare con gli altri, ma proviamo a vedere cosa succede, io ho messo il traduttore in automatico... vediamo se potete farlo anche voi ) si tratta della costruzione della caracca Santa Maria, forse uno dei modelli maggiormente realizzati da quasi tutti i modellistici, i piani di costruzione sono allegati nel libro " Le navi di Colombo" di Heinrich Winter, si tratta di un sei tavole in scala 1/50 nel quale viene riportata la "caracca" (nao) di Cristoforo Colombo, o almeno, uno dei tentativi di riportare, come doveva essere la "nao" di Cristoforo, con la quale nel 1492 attraverso l' oceano Atlantico con l' intento di scoprire le Indie..... altro libro che ho e nel quale vengono riportati altri esempi di disegni sulla caravella è "The ship of Christopher Columbus" di Xavier Pastor, il libro di Winter lo avevo da diversi anni, ma non ero particolarmente attratto dal modello, uno tra i piu' classici modelli, e per di piu' di una nave "tonda" cosa che non lega o meglio legava con il mio gusto, perchè fino ad oggi avevo realizzato modelli di nave "lunghe", ma c'è sempre una prima volta... anche perché la realizzazione della caracca non è particolarmente complessa e questo modello mi permette di ripartire con la realizzazione di un altro modello in un periodo nel quale ho poco tempo, per cui la decisione di partire con questo modello è stata presa non tanto per la realizzazione stessa, ma per il "bisogno" di ripartire,,, per cui mi sono messo a guardare le tavole realizzate da Adametz, nelle quali viene riportato anche la costruzione di un particolare "scaletto" per la messa in opera delle ordinate sulla chiglia e il fasciame, cosa che ho realizzato scrupolosamente, e che non avevo mai trovato in altri piani costruttivi in pratica sullo scaletto verrà realizzata in maniera "capovolta" la parte iniziale della realizzazione del modello, con le ordinate che andranno ad aderire alle battute riportate sullo scaletto, almeno l'intento dovrebbe essere questo.......vedremo saluti a tutti luponero
  3. Hello All, As the title says, "De Smit Rotterdam" will be my newest adventure. For those interested, some history. In January 1974, Smit Internationale decided to build two super tugs, which with their 22.000 IHP at that time became the strongest, operationally operating sea tugs in the world. The order for these two powerhouses went to B.V. Scheepswerf & Machinefabriek 'De Merwede' v h van Vliet & Co., Hardinxveld-Giessendam. The content of these tugboats is 2273 grt., Length a.o. 74.83 m, width 15.78 m and gr. draft 7.60 m. Two Stork Werkspoor TM 410 4 tew 9 cil. diesel engines, each connected to a four-bladed adjustable propeller, delivered a capacity of 13500 apk, the installed capacity is 22.000 IHP. "De Smit Rotterdam" was the first of the two to leave the slope on December 6, 1974, after being baptized by Queen Juliana. In mid-April 1975 the tug came into service with Smit, to be used directly as the leading tugboat for the transport of the drilling and production platform "Beryl-A" of the Condeep type, with a weight of 350,000 tons. 216 miles was towed from Stavanger to the Beryl field of Mobiel Oil, in the English part of the North Sea along with the "North Sea" (11,000 hp) and the Bugsier tugs "Atlantic", "Wotan" (both with a capacity of 12,500 hp) and the "Pacific" (10,000 hp), together about 42,000 hp of towing capacity. In 1986 the tugboat was accommodated at Smit Tak International Ltd., Nassau, and in 1991 the sea tugboats of Smit Internationale and Wijsmuller were merged into the combination 'SmitWijs Towage C.V' and the tugboat sails under the name "Smitwijs Rotterdam". As it often happens to ships, at one point they are discarded by the original owner and they wear their last years for relatively little money and, above all, with little maintenance, in the service of countries that actually sail the boats until they can no longer sail. That also happened with "De Smit Rotterdam". In 2013 the ship came into Panamanian hands. In July 2014 De Smit Rotterdam was demolished. Built: Hardinxveld-Giessendam. Tonnage: 2273 gross register tonnage Length overall: 74,83 m Beam overall: 15,78 m Motor: 22.000 IHP Engine speed:16,5 knots Crew:25 Fire-fighting: 400 tons/hour with 14 to. 10 ton a foam Below the measurements of the model: Model length: 95 cm. Model beam: 20 cm. Model height: 50n cm. Sjors
  4. Hi there, I went through the topics of the board and saw that there are general issues in getting the right wood for building your ship model. My recommendation is to go to your local carpenter and see what kind of wood he is using in his daily work and which comes from the area you life. You can spend a lot of money in ordering wood via a retailer and get a glossy and nicely wrapped material. I believe that the beauty lie's in a non perfect wood. All of the woods I use are mainly out of the area where I live: Swiss pear, cubed pear, walnut, plum, boxwood (mainly from old graveyards) and many more. On the pictures which are attached you can see three different kinds of wood: Swiss pear, boxwood (approx. 450 years old) and Argentina Lapacho which I got from a turist who visited my Museum (e.g. the Lion is made from this wood). What are your suggestions? Best regards, Ivan
  5. Greetings all! My first post is to display the find that brought me here. I found this kit in a thrift store down the street. They wanted $100 for it, but gave me a military discount! I was thrilled, since I have been to see the ship when I was on a business trip in Boston. It really made an impression on me. I enjoyed the museum. I learned about the time during a storm when the ship came loose from its lines and was swinging around on its remaining moorings. It swung into the modern steel warship moored next to it and did extreme damage to it, while taking only scratches itself. An amazing ship, undefeated in battle (even if it required her crew to man the boats and tow her out of the doldrums.) My background in making stuff is mixed. Plane models as a kid, home repair, car modifications, machining, and extensive gunsmithing. I have never done anything more detailed in wood than a pinewood derby car, but I'm ex-military, and believe I can follow a manual. Looks like everything is here. We'll see!
  6. Hello all, The Santísima Trinídad was built in Havana and launched on 2nd March 1769. It was the biggest warship of the 18th century, with 130 guns. After taking part in the naval campaigns of the late 18th and early 19th century, it last saw active service at the battle of Trafalgar, under the ensign of rear admiral Cisneros, where it was dismasted by the English fleet. Measurements: Length : 1060 mm Heigth : 876 mm Width : 415 mm Click here for more information about the Spanish ship Nuestra Señora de la Santísima Trinidad. I already cleared the workspace to make room for her. But alas, one piece of the keel and one frame were warped. The keel was so terribly warped, and I was so surprised by the look of it, that I totally forgot to take a picture. Sorry Enjoy, Sjors
  7. Hi All, After having been away from the hobby for a while I purchased the combined USS Monitor and CSS Virginia kits from Bluejacket. I completed the USS Monitor and a build log if it can be seen here: Now moving on to the CSS Virginia. It is a noticeably more complex kit than the Monitor but of equally high quality. The hull is well formed and the various metal pieces come in a nice segregated and sealed bag. The plans are also well drawn and quite descriptive. Thanks to @MrBlueJacket and company for again making a great kit. Looking forward to getting into the thick of building it. The kit contains a number of individual metal pieces all nicely packaged. I couldn't resist setting the completed USS Monitor next to the bare hull of the CSS Virginia for scale.
  8. all, My Halve Maen build was already on hold, but during our move to a new house in November 2015, she got lost because one of our friends put her box on the pavement instead of in our car. After that the enthusiasm to build was completely gone. I spent last year enjoying my other hobbies. But, as a Dutch saying goes: 'Blood is thicker than water' and the urge to build another ship came back. So, May I present to you the Spanish Galleon Nuestra Señora del Pilar De Zaragoza (Our lady of the pillar of Zaragoza), a Spanish Treasure Galleon. Measurements Length: 1110 mm Height: 970 mm Width: 520 mm History During the 17th and 18th centuries Spanish galleons served the Spanish crown as merchantmen and warships. Many of them sailed between Acapulco and Manila, transporting South American silver to the Philippines and exotic goods from Asia to Mexico, from where the treasures were sent back to Spain. Commisioned in 1731 and launched in 1733, Nuestra Señora del Pilar de Zaragoza (Our Lady of the Pillar of Zaragoza) was one of these Manila Galleons built of the finest Philippine wood, she was 112 feet on deck and displaced 1,000 tons. A 4th rate of the Cavogonda class, she was fitted with 50 cannon, two stern chasers and six swivel guns. She carried a crew of 385 men. For twenty years she sailed the route from Mexico to Manila and in 1750 underwent a complete refit in the Port of Cavite. In 1750, on her last voyage, she set sail from Manila bound for Acapulco. Despite being overloaded, and contrary to the opinion of both pilots and Master, her Captain insisted on weighing anchor at the beginning of September. En route for the Mariana Islands, in the Pacific, they began to have difficulties after sailing into a heavy storm, and she sank taking all of her crew down with her. Frames dry fit. Frames glued in place. Reinforcing pieces not glued yet. Frames glued in place. Last three frames fitted and glued. Reinforcing pieces glued. Close-up bow section Close-up stern section Enjoy and thank you for watching. Anja
  9. This area of the forum was a great resource for information on where to buy various types of wood. Let's rebuild that information using our collective knowledge and experience. I've given credit in parenthesis to those who have contributed the name of that source. Sources of milled wood (Australia): Modellers Shipyard (Shazmira) - A limited selection of sheet and strip stock. They also have kits, tools, and other supplies. Ships internationally. Sources of milled wood (France): Arkowood (TRJ) - Portal of the German company (see below). Sources of milled wood (Germany): Arkowood (TRJ) - A bit on the expensive side, but good for smaller quantities. All major wood varieties, including swiss pear, box, lime. Massivholzwerkstätten Horschig (Redshirt) - Good assortment of wood, high accuracy and good price. Sources of milled wood (UK): Hobby's (AntonyUK) TwigFolly (Marsares) JoTiKa (Marsares) Cornwall Boat Models (Marsares) The Model Dockyard (Marsares) Sources of milled wood (USA): Crown Timberyard - A good selection of the more popular species of wood for model ship building. Tends to be milled very precisely, to a smoother finish. Ships internationally. Wood Project Source - A good selection of the more popular species of wood for model ship building. Tends to be milled very precisely, to a smoother finish. Ships internationally. Itasca - Mainly a source for basswood. Their "Half Price" wood is still of good quality and excellent value. $20 minimum order size. 20% military discount. National Balsa - Another source for basswood, Maple, Cheerry. More expensive than Itasca, but they have a greater range of sizes and have lots of dowels. tallships_model_builder (themadchemist) - An eBay store with several items targeted towards model ship builders (eg. Deck planking and sheet wood). May be willing to cut custom sizes for you. http://www.northeasternscalelumber.com/shop/index.php?PHPSESSID=fbf4aea8bc5623641aa53ab405ec4c6a - Northeastern Scale Lumber Sources of rough lumber (Australia): Trend Timbers (1492) - Local, imported and exotic timbers. Anagote Timbers (Jim Lad) - Local and imported timbers. Named after a pet goat called Anna. Australian Furniture Timbers (BANYAN) - A wide selection of timbers. Avilable in 1 meter lengths. Sources of rough lumber (UK): Workshop Heaven (AntonyUK) - Various sized chunks of exotic wood Yandles (Kevin) Sources of rough/billets lumber (USA): Gilmer Wood Company - Mainly Exotic wood and much of it highly figured. The main species of interest for ship modelers will be boxwood, ebony, and holly. $100 USD minimum order for Internet purchases, no minimum for walk-in purchases. Ships internationally. Cookwoods (mtaylor) - Exotic hardwoods. Ships internationally. Righteous Woods (davec) - Domestic, imported and exotic timbers. $100 USD minimum order for Internet purchases. Ships internationally. Tallgrass Custom Wood Productsfff382 (Thairinker) - Domestic hardwoods. Located in Kansas, does not appear to offer shipping. Woodworkers Source (Sephirem) - Domestic and imported. Lumber is organized based on geographic region that it comes from. Sources of rough lumber (global): A local hardwood store - Usually a great place to buy domestic wood and some exotics. I have seen ebony and purpleheart at Woodcraft. A local hardwood flooring store (muzzleloader) - Mahogany, maple, cherry and other hard woods. Inquire about sales of remnants at bargain prices. A note on Gilmer: This is a local business for me so I am fortunate that I can visit. If you've purchased milled Castello Boxwood for your model then it probably came from here. They told me that they don't have a source for this wood anymore, but in addition to the large stack of wood towering over me they also had a bunch more in another warehouse. The Castello Boxwood starts out as rough 8/4 (2" thick) boards around 6" wide and 7' long. When the stock on their website gets low they pull down a board, clean it up in a planer, spray with shellac to bring out the color, then seal the ends with wax. They told me if I was to buy a board off the top of the stack it would be $30 a board foot (1"x12"x12") but that if I wanted to dig through the stack they'd up the price to $35 per board foot. Indeed, the chunks on their website were about $35 a board foot when I last ran the numbers. Ebony is tricky stuff as it all looks the same in pictures so ask them to select a board with straight grain, if you tell them it is for a ship model they will understand what you need. When I was there last they showed me how to hold the ebony to the light to check the grain for straightness. Also don't be too concerned if the description of Castello Boxwood on the website is "figured" as that is what they listed my piece of wood as and it was actually fairly straight. Not all wood can be sold to customers outside of the USA because of laws to protect endangered species.
  10. Hello to you all fellow builders, As you know , Mobbsie has ordered the HMS Agamemnon for me and finally she is in dry dock in Schiedam. I will not start on her . I have first finish the Le Mirage. But when you have a new kit in the house , you want to show it. That's the reason why I open a build log…... First of course a little history lesson and later on the pictures of all the stuff that is in the box. When I start on her I know I need a lot of help and advise from all of you. I have a few great examples of other Aggy's and I know that Mobbsie will be there for me if needed. So let the lesson begins and hopefully it will not take to long when I can start building her. Caldercraft HMS Agamemnon 1781 1:64 HMS Agamemnon 1781 64 Gun 3rd Rate Ship of the Line 1:64 Scale. The Agamemnon was one of seven ships built to the same design, drawn by the same naval architect that designed the famous Victory, Sir Thomas Slade. Agamemnon was the third to be built in the class, the first two being Ardent in 1762 and Raisonnable, laid down in 1763. Third was Agamemnon, followed by Belliqueux in 1778, Stately in 1779, Indefatigable in 1781 and finally the Nassau in 1783. A Third Rate ship of the line like Agamemnon was an expensive warship to build. The construction of the ship’s hull with yards and masts fitted cost the Admiralty £20,579 (in today’s terms, approximately £12 million), a figure that did not include ordnance, sails, hemp, copper plating and other hardware. For three of the most crucial decades in British naval history, Agamemnon always seemed to be at the centre of the action, having no less than eleven battle honours. Agamemnon’s maiden voyage was on 9th July 1781 under the command of Captain Caldwell. Her first engagement was at the battle of Ushant on 12th December 1781 where the British fleet under Rear Admiral Kempenfelt defeated the French fleet and captured a significant number of ships, including the convoy the French were escorting. Agamemnon’s next major engagement was at the Battle of The Saints on 12th April 1782 where Rodney and Lord Hood’s fleet defeated Comte de Grasse’s French fleet. On 7th January 1793, Nelson learned from Lord Hood that he had been chosen to command his first ship of the line, the Agamemnon. Although initially disappointed that he had not been given command of a 74, Nelson soon grew fond of Agamemnon. Nelson wrote to his wife, Fanny. She was, he said, "Without exception one of the finest ships in the fleet, with the character of sailing most remarkably well". He also wrote after twelve days in a storm in the Mediterranean in "Gales and lumping seas but in Agamemnon we mind them not; she is the finest ship I ever sailed in, and were she a 74, nothing should induce me to leave her while the war lasts". Even a French Commander Admiral Alemand expressed the view that Agamemnon was one of the fastest ships in the British Navy. That, coupled with Nelson’s inspirational command made her a very potent fighting unit. Nelson commanded Agamemnon, or "eggs and bacon" as her crew affectionately called her, until 10th June 1796. In that time Nelson had proved to be a great Commander, tactically and physically. It was during his command of Agamemnon that Nelson lost the sight of his right eye. When at the Siege of Calvi in 1794 during the morning of 10th July, Nelson was hit in the face and chest by splinters, stones and sand that were thrown up by an enemy shell that hit a battlement during a shore action. On 13th June 1796, Nelson’s broad pennant was transferred to the 74 gun Captain at anchor in San-Fiorenza bay. He watched the worn out Agamemnon sail to England for a much-needed refit. She was refitted from the bottom up at Chatham. When re-commissioned in 1797 she was ordered to join Admiral Duncan’s squadron off Yarmouth, which was keeping watch on the coast of Holland. She was immediately caught up in the naval mutinies of that year. Agamemnon was however considered untrustworthy by Richard Parker the leader of the Nore mutineers and had the guns of the mutinous ships trained on her to ensure she did not ‘blackleg’. Subsequently in the proceedings that followed all thirteen of Agamemnon’s crew who were tried were pardoned. Agamemnon’s next major fleet engagement was the battle of Copenhagen on the 21st April 1801. Unfortunately she was grounded on a shoal for most of the action, but Nelson won the battle and a truce with Denmark was negotiated. On the 21st October 1805 Agamemnon took part in the battle of Trafalgar. When Nelsons favorite ship hove in sight a week before, with Nelsons old friend Sir Edward Berry in command of the Agamemnon, Nelson was delighted "Here comes that damned fool Berry! Now we shall have a battle." At Trafalgar the 27 British ships of the line defeated the Franco Spanish fleet of 33 line of battle ships in a victory that ensured British supremacy of the sea for the next 100 years. Later in Agamemnon’s career, she served in the West Indies, taking part in the battle of Santo Domingo, and then in South American waters. Agamemnon was wrecked in Maldonado Bay off the coast of Uruguay on the 16th June 1809. Divers have recently discovered the remains of HMS Agamemnon on the bottom of Maldonado Bay, after a six-year search by marine archaeologists. Strewn around the site are hundreds of copper plate, as well as a 24 pounder cannon, parts of the pumping devices as well as a significant amount of shot, bolts and copper nails. Also discovered was a silver pocket seal, complete with fob chain. On its face of translucent stone it bore a star shaped emblem with the name ‘Nelson’ in mirror image incised in a curve above. Agamemnon was laid down at Bucklers Hard in May 1777 and launched on the 10th April 1781. Her dimensions were as follows; Gun deck - 160 feet 2 inches Keel- 131 feet 10 1/4 inches Beam - 44 feet 5 inches Tonnage - 1384 tons Guns; Twenty-six, twenty-four pounder - Gun deck. Twenty-six, eighteen pounder - Upper deck. Twelve, nine pounder - Quarterdeck. Complement - 491 officers and ratings. The Caldercraft Agamemnon kit features: Double plank on bulkhead construction, Keel and bulkheads are CNC cut in Birch ply as are all the major constructional parts. Extensive use of CNC cut Walnut has been employed for the majority of visible structures and fittings. The wood strip pack contains Lime wood for the first planking, Walnut for the second planking and Tanganyka for the decks. Ramin dowel is supplied for the masts and yards. Walnut and etched brass stern gallery windows, with the remaining tafrail decoration in finely cast white metal. Scale brass cannon barrels with walnut carriages. Rigging thread is supplied in natural and black to rig the model as depicted in the photographs. Beechwood deck gratings and Walnut Blocks and deadeyes. Shroud cleats, trucks, stunsail yard brackets as well as CNC cut Walnut tops, crosstrees, trestle trees, mast caps and a wealth of unique detail parts. Copper plates are provided to sheath the hull bottom. Fully detailed full size plans and a comprehensive construction manual. Specifications: Scale: 1:64 Length: 1300mm Width: 490mm Height 945mm Planking: Double
  11. Greetings, I'm from Hungary, and until now, I built mainly WW2 ships and planes from plastic kits. Now I decided to build a tall ship, and I ended up with two kits, but I can't decide which to buy. One is the 1/96 plastic model of the Cutty Sark from Revell (Nr. 5422), and the other one is from wood, the 1/124 Thermopylae model of Sergal. Which of do you recommend to a beginner in sailing ships, and why? If you know alternatives for a maximum of €80-100, in the category of XIX. century ships, I would appreciate it too. Thanks in advance.
  12. Welcome to my log. Sovereign of the Seas was a 17th-century warship of the English Navy. She was ordered as a 90-gun first-rate ship of the line of the English Royal Navy, but at launch was armed with 102 bronze guns at the insistence of the king. She was later renamed Sovereign, and then Royal Sovereign. The ship was launched on 13 October 1637 and served from 1638 until 1697, when a fire burned the ship to the waterline at Chatham. Source: Wikipedia. Click here for more information. Enjoy. Sjors
  13. Many, many years ago I bought a Brazilian boxwood trunk. I had it rough sawn into planks ranging from 3/4” to 1/16” thicknesses (see attached photos). The planks are about 36” long. I now want to use this now well-seasoned wood for a model, but I need to finish the timber before I can use it. I’m seeking advice as to the best and most accurate way to achieve a smooth surface finish with a consistent thickness throughout the length of each plank. Should I use a planner/sander, or...? With thanks in advance!
  14. Hi all!! Finally my kit arrived yesterday evening. I had to wait for her for 8 weeks. I wanted to take a picture of all what is in the box but my hobbyroom is simply not big enough to show it all. Sergal renewed the building inscription, now also in Dutch. I putted my new topic on the wrong place and also dubble, so I had to delete it all, so: @Jörgen and @Sjors, you both have to renew your follow and @Eddie, thx for the tip. I hope I did it right now Some pictures...
  15. I'm midway through a build of the Emma C. Berry. I took a year+ off due to buying and renovating a new house. In the meantime, people have been anxiously awaiting promised updates of progress. I thought a fun project, or couple, would be to recreate some of the parts of some amazing builds on MSW. A recreated frame w/ blackened nails or a full keel. Accompanied by some plans and shadowboxed. I'm struggling on two parts: I can't seem to get wood to save my life. I have placed an order at Wood Project Source, but two weeks later realized I neglected to supply a unit number in my shipping address (please note, this is an error on my end - not theirs). Reading before placing a second order, due to demand, it may be 2-3+ weeks before I can get some wood to work with. Any US vendors than can delivery relatively quicker? Looking for pear and boxwood preferably. I don't have accurate plans for a frame (and it's parts) or keel. Are there accessible plans with a minimal cost that are limited to the parts I want? I know this question extends beyond the scope of this forum, but advise would be great. Thank you all, and a silent tip of the hat to all the builds I've been watching that have inspired me. Ryan
  16. Starting my first log! This is my second POH ship and was looking to start afresh in my ship modeling seeing as my last model didn't survive my most recent move and I need a nifty new mantle decoration. Adventure is a "pirate" schooner kit offered by Amati. The last ship I completed was also an Amati in 2014 and I now recall frustrations from the vague details in the instructions provided. I rushed through that model, had plenty of very, very visible mistakes and only admired the finished product as it was my first. Luckily I found another build log here for Adventure that has been helpful, and I figured I'd document my current build here also to further the available info for future "Adventure-rs". I'm on break from school for the next few weeks so I really hope to get a lot done with the build. I've already completed some of the first steps (deck planking, first hull planking), I'll be posting pictures soon! Thanks!
  17. On Tuesday we had a big storm in Germany in y neighbourhood a walnuttree was knocked down - today I can get some wood for helping to saw. So I'm going to help. For the work I'll be able to pick some of the wood. Due to the price of wood the do want to get for sawed wood in the internet I'm willing to invest a bit of time and sweat. But my question is how to handle the wood. I know it must lager for a timeof about two years to get dry. So that I can't use the wood imediatly. So I have to peel off the bark? Or shall I try to cut the branch in to quater or eightedge bar. They will be around 5-20cm / 2-9' diameter abd 30-50cm / 12'' - 18'' long. With a bit of good luck I'll get a bit thicker parts. I have only got a little table saw by Proxxon and an old scroll saw to cut. Hope you don't say after all this work: “Sorry fot you but just walnut has the wrong grain for 1/64 shipbuilding.“ Thanks for your intrest und help.
  18. Are any of you builders of small ships aware of a technique for bending woods like mahogany, teak, maple etc utilising liquid ammonia? It apparently plasticises the fibres of the wood so it can be easily bent to shape where it will return to its wood state staying bent. i would be interested to hear if anyone is familiar with this technique. cheers David
  19. I found this website during browsing for another thing. It has a lot of good info but also ideas of what we builder can built ourselves to help us in the workshop and having some diy tools. Specially lathe setup with a power drill seems interesting.
  20. Most of the way done on this build, will get some photos and notes here later...
  21. This build is in planning at this time, should start in the next month or two. I have the kit and have checked the parts and started to prep them for building.

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If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model shipcraft.

The Nautical Research Guild puts on ship modeling seminars, yearly conferences, and juried competitions. We publish books on ship modeling techniques as well as our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, whose pages are full of articles by master ship modelers who show you how they build those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you what details to build.

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Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
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