Jump to content

Gaetan Bordeleau

Members
  • Content Count

    835
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling
  • Location
    Quebec, Canada

Recent Profile Visitors

1,746 profile views
  1. Gaetan Bordeleau

    74 gun ship by Gaetan Bordeleau - 1:24

    Wall construction
  2. Ed is right we use the same method, with some variants; he gets the taper from the head, I get it by an attachment, I turn from the opposite end because it is easier to center the hole for the guns balls. The most important is that it is made by steps, specializing in one part at the time.
  3. None of the above. The first times I used a duplicator for Unimat. Now I use a taper attachment, a guide to set a precise angle for the taper. I work by steps which is at the end a faster method but collets are required to reposition blanks more precisely Example first deck cannons, same step for each ones, then second step for each one and so on
  4. I used another method with Unimat Lathe. The difficulty in taper turning is to set the angle of the taper. This setup has no angles to adjust
  5. Gaetan Bordeleau

    74 gun ship by Gaetan Bordeleau - 1:24

    USING A FLASH OR NOT? Last week, a man, in an exhibition, was saying that he was always using a flash in manual mode, never in TTL (true the lens). Many years ago, it was true. Todays flash are much more performing. Here is another common belief : a studio flash is much more performing than a flash on a camera. With the development of the electronic technology; you can buy a flash which fits on the camera hot shoe and it can perform in TTL as good as in manual. This week, I got a new on camera flash and I am very please by his performance. On the last 2 photos, untouched, show the result of this morning test : The first one : with a flash in TTL mode, 100% automatic. The last one : no flash, neon lighting. The color are not as much appealing!
  6. Welcome back Mark, You should build at 1/24 scale! It is a lot easier to do the planking in the curves with 0 stress on the planks, The plank is cut in 3D including the curve, the only drawback: it takes more wood.
  7. Gaetan Bordeleau

    74 gun ship by Gaetan Bordeleau - 1:24

    Partially true; sometimes, the work is done in the head when going to sleep. I do not work many hours daily, but on a regular base . Thank you, everyone, for your likes.
  8. Gaetan Bordeleau

    74 gun ship by Gaetan Bordeleau - 1:24

    Installation of the terrace floor. Only a table is missing for the party.
  9. That would be a nice cover page for Lee Valley. I could not do better.
  10. Gaetan Bordeleau

    74 gun ship by Gaetan Bordeleau - 1:24

    Last night, just before supper, I did a link between desk arm supports and a chair. I had both extremities, just needed the link. I like to build with brass nails, temporary links between 2 wood parts. This allows to see if connection angles are good before gluing everything.
  11. Gaetan Bordeleau

    74 gun ship by Gaetan Bordeleau - 1:24

    Hi Andre, Everybody can follow logs they like, if you like mine, I am honored, thank you You open a new perspective to the projection of an image. I guess that it is even already possible. If a "projector' can create a 3D image in 3 plans(Even if I have a 3D projector, the problem is that that the projection is just in 2 plans) : width, height and the missing link: depth, then everything would be perfect! I could see exactly where I have to glue a part... And yes, your vision is perfectly right, one day it will assist us. Scratch building was for a long period building only with your own hands an some simple tools. Then the 'motor" arrived (water, steam, gas... electricity). Today, we all use electric tools and we are stillo doing scratch building. Actually, dazzling development of data processing open new doors for the model ship makers: 5 axes robots, 3D printing, Autocad plans... Everyday new tools arrive on the market, and we adapt our technics with new tools, and we are still doing model ship building. Tools evolve but the name remains the same: scratch building.
  12. Gaetan Bordeleau

    74 gun ship by Gaetan Bordeleau - 1:24

    Hi Carl, How are they positioned? It is difficult to answer in few words, but in 2 words; it depends, of the effect you want. In fact experimentation will guide you where to install the light without too much shadows. I think that it is more important to know that you need 3 things for this kind of photos: 1- you cannot do this during the day unless you ca have darkness in the room; usually after the sun sleeps is a good time. 2- all lights in the room off, except at least 1 but it can be more. I like to use a small lamp with a goose neck; JANSJÖ from IKEA: $10 but it can be what you have at home. I like the gooseneck because I can easily position the lamp to light the subject to be photograph. 3- a camera with a manual mode. Automatic camera with integrated flash will not work because the scene being dark, the camera will want to use his flash. Today, I used 2 different cameras both at 200 ISO, maximum aperture (F as small as possible) and adjusted the time so that I can see the subject. If, by example you would like to have another area visible, you can another lamp for that area. Surprisingly, it is not very hard to get good results, just try it and you will be surprise of the results.
  13. Gaetan Bordeleau

    74 gun ship by Gaetan Bordeleau - 1:24

    photos with 2 table lamps

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model shipcraft.

The Nautical Research Guild puts on ship modeling seminars, yearly conferences, and juried competitions. We publish books on ship modeling techniques as well as our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, whose pages are full of articles by master ship modelers who show you how they build those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you what details to build.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×