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HMS Blandford by hamilton - FINISHED - from Corel HMS Greyhound - 1:100

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Hamilton,

 

Nice work. Like Mike I am taking a lot of inspiration away from this build for my own efforts.

 

I will have to stand over you with the "cat" because I want to see more, More,MORE...... :)  :)  :) :)  :)  

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Hi Hamilton


This is really coming together. It looks great! Good on you for pushing to make it right as "HMS Blandford" rather than the kit version. I'll keep following.


 


Cheers


Alistair


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Thanks for the comments all! Very much appreciated....Ian - unfortunately I'm allergic to cats!! And as for more - the sun has finally come out in the Pacific Northwest (a rare enough event) so I've been spending a lot of time getting some much needed yard work done. In the evenings I have barely enough energy left to lift a mug to my lips let alone fiddle around at 1:100 scale....but more progress should come soon...

 

In any case - thanks all for your thoughts! Despite the limitations of this kit, adapting it to the Blandford has been a real adventure so far....my first real kit bash, and a lot of fun. I think the next one's going to be something very simple and straightforward.....HA!!

hamilton

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Another brief update - not much modelling done recently, but I have managed to finish the forward hatches and the build the 3 ladders running from the main to the lower deck. Here are a couple of pics....


 


post-304-0-82744300-1373954108_thumb.jpg


 


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post-304-0-71289500-1373954156_thumb.jpg


 


On another note, I mentioned in an earlier post that I purchase some brass bare tree frames from a local model train store that I thought I might use for the decorative elements along the bulwarks forward & aft and on the transom. Here is a shot of the item I bought.


 


post-304-0-02188100-1373954185_thumb.jpg


 


And here is a bit of it dry fit onto the bulwarks aft....


 


post-304-0-71684400-1373954208_thumb.jpg


 


Be honest with me, people - I know this is not really historically accurate and I'm willing to live with that - but beyond that, do you think it works? It will be very painstaking and tedious to apply this stuff, and I would rather have something on the bulwarks than leave them bare - I don't think it will look awful, but I'm just not sure it's worth it to go through with it....Unfortunately I have no real back-up plan and if these don't go on, I'll simply leave the bulwarks undecorated......your thoughts will be much appreciated...thanks as always!


 


hamilton


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Hi Hamilton

I'm with Ferit on this. Adding random decoration is going to be difficult and could end up looking just like really strange bling. Leave it plain or get realistic decorations by buying a Pegasus PE set (these are separately available from the kit but the scale is 1/64), or something similar. That way you get all the additions that are right for the era.

 

If that doesn't fit - budget or otherwise, I reckon, straight up, plain is better.

 

Cheers

Alistair

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Well I guess the word is in....I agree....I was looking at the dry-fit piece again this morning and realising that I was really just "improvising" in a situation where it isn't appropriate. Thanks all for the intervention!!

 

hamilton

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Yeah.... I think on this one I have to agree with the crowd... Nice idea but I feel it would end up having your ship look like it was covered with a hedge rather than the effect you're going for.

 

Andy

 

Weren't hedges ever in fashion as ship's decorations? Just dolphins and unicorns and cherubs and stags I guess...What about the mighty hedge!!!

hamilton

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It's a shame Anton has not reappeared (username "perthshipyard"), he was building the HMS Diana and had taken the time to paint all the frieze work by hand. Very talented with a brush. You would have been able to pick up more than a few tips from him.

 

Andy

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Weren't hedges ever in fashion as ship's decorations? Just dolphins and unicorns and cherubs and stags I guess...What about the mighty hedge!!!

hamilton

 

That's the mighty "larch" if I remember the song correctly.... :P  :P :P  

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Hi Andy:

 

It's these kinds of jobs that will probably permanently bar me from scratch building - carving and decorative finishing....I say "not my strengths", but I really should say that I don't even know where to start....anyway...at some point I'll have to just sit down with a knife and a stick and start practicing....

hamilton

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Hi hamilton I have to add my name to the list of those who think the bare twig look does not work. Scale link do a range of foliage frets which may work better, but before you give up and leave it plain, try painting a strip of paper of the required width with a series of scrolls and say acanthus leaves, you may surprise yourself. The book artwork gives a lead.

 

Cheers,

 

B.E.

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That's the mighty "larch" if I remember the song correctly.... :P  :P :P  

 

Of course you're right - not to mention, the "stately elm" - neither of which will figure on the Blandford.....

hamilton

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On the original which kind of decoration was there?

Via internet I have not had any answer... Is the presence or the form of the decoration unclear?

Edited by ashiponthehorizon

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Hi Ferit:

 

There is some indication in Goodwin's Anatomy of the Ship Blandford - scroll and leaf patterns. The book actually presents the Blandford in a slightly larger scale (1:96) than the Corel model, but either way it is very small detail work. In any case, I know I'm not ready for it, so I'm going to leave it blank....sad as it is. 

hamilton

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Hi Ferit:

 

There is some indication in Goodwin's Anatomy of the Ship Blandford - scroll and leaf patterns. The book actually presents the Blandford in a slightly larger scale (1:96) than the Corel model, but either way it is very small detail work. In any case, I know I'm not ready for it, so I'm going to leave it blank....sad as it is. 

hamilton

Hi Hamilton,

Don't give up, don't be sad!...

I believe in your skill to manage it...

You can try at least... What would you lost? The time at most... The modelling is already outside of the worries about time... This is a way to know our limits. Before you have handled your scratch on the stern area, had you known how well would be the result?!

If you think to paint the decoration, then you can glue very small wooden or other material parts, one by one, like mosaic, on a leaf of paper on which the decoration had been drawn. The junctions could be filled and the outcome could be sanded and then painted, finally could be fixed after sanding the paper on the back side...

Or you can apply many layers of white glue following the lines of the decoration drawn on a leaf of paper, one layer over the another after the previous has got dry. When you reach the desired bulging (puff), you could shape easily the dried glue then paint it...

It's not indispensable to catch the museum quality, we (at least me) are not sculptors, wood engravers but it would be a pleasure for you and us to admire your own harvest...

Edited by ashiponthehorizon

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That's a great post by Ferit.  I too fear carving and sculpting.  But he reminds me there is this stuff called 'sculpy' which I think they sell in craft stores.  It's a putty that you shape (like the many layers of glue he describes) and then bake it off and it becomes solid.  Supposedly easy to work with and takes paint well.  One day, when I get stuck, I may try it.

 

Just a possible option for you.

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Ahoy Hamilton :D

 

Chuck has a decorative band on his English Pinnace Kit and I have also seen similar bands on the upper section of the gunwales on larger ships. I believe it is easily done by applying something printed. 

 

From Chucks instructions

 

http://www.modelexpo-online.com/images/docs/MS1458/MS1458-Pinnace-Instructions.pdf

These are printed sheets that were created on an inkjet printer. Before you cut them out, it would be a good idea to apply some sort of fixative. One approach that is effective without having to go out and buy some artist’s spray fixative would be to use some hairspray. This is an old and cheap trick used by starving artists to preserve their work. The UV protection also prevents the colors from fading over time.

The frieze is just 1/8" wide. Carefully cut it out using a sharp blade. Some extras were provided just in case. There are two colors to choose from. The red friezes may be too much of the same color for some, so another set in blue was also included. I glued them to the hull with a child’s glue stick. I have three kids who use them a lot and I find they work well for gluing paper onto wood. Apply the glue to the back of the frieze strip and position it below the cap rail.

 

 

Maybe Chuck can send you the file for the blue one

post-108-0-90359100-1374080554.jpg

Edited by JPett

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What Commodore Augie is talking about, I think, exists in the log of an unbelievable but a real high talented persona Doris... She shows and guides how to make decorations also through videos... If you had never visited her log I certainly recommend you to shoot a glance, you would be glued to her build... That is like an illusion...

 

http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/854-royal-caroline-by-doris-card-1749-140/

Edited by ashiponthehorizon

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Wow - all this support has nearly brought me to tears!! I can't say how much I appreciate all the encouragement and helpful suggestions from all of you Thank you so much!!!

 

J - this is a great idea for a newbie such as myself - I'm not sure I would use Chuck's screens for the pinnace, but I will use this idea I think

 

Augie - I've used sculpy before for some very simple decorative scrollwork on the Sultana (another Chuck Passaro practicum suggestion). I think I'll follow Ferit's link above and check out Doris' work

 

Ferit - I can't thank you enough for your kind words! You've convinced me not to just give up - and you're absolutely right - if we're unwilling to give our time to improving our talents through this process and to making our work as nice as possible (within our own "reasonable" standards) then what's the point! I've already made the ship's rudder twice out of dissatisfaction with my results and will make it a third time tonight! So why not take a stab at this other thing? Thanks for passing on such inspiration!

 

In any case - an opportunity has presented itself that may result in some nice bulwark decorations...may take a bit of time, but it will work much better and be closer to historical than my initial (misguided and bizarre) idea of the brass tree frames!

 

Thanks once again to all - what a great group is to be found here!

hamilton

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I wouldn't necessarily call your tree branches misguided...or bizarre for that matter... It was a creative attempt to realize some decoration, using a technique seen in other kits. You still deserve full points for imagination. :)

 

Ferit is absolutely correct; don't give up ;)

 

Andy

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Hamilton,

 

Good for you for being willing to try... here's the page I reference a lot from Olivier Bello's site: http://www.arsenal-modelist.com/index.php?page=accessories

 

In particular: http://www.arsenal-modelist.com/index.php?page=accessories∂=25

 

The printed decorations also will work.  On the smaller vessels, much of the decorations were painted on and not carved.

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Thanks Andy and Mark - so I have not yet given up on the bulwark decorations, but I have put them on pause for a bit...To pass the time while turning my mind around my latest approach to that problem, I've decided to make the rudder and the cannons - it's fortunate that with projects like this there's always something else to do while you're figuring other stuff out!

 

I made the rudder three times. The first was out of 4mm x 4mm beach that I had left over from another build. This didn't work out - I messed up carving out the slots for the pintles and gudgeons. The second was from 3mm x 3mm lime, planked with .5mm lime. This didn't work because the shape was off. The last one was from the same material as number two, but I used a template to get the correct shape and it worked out quite well. Finished in white, Golden Oak and Red.

 

For the Pintles and Gudgeons, I abandoned the metal parts supplied in the kit and used 1/16 x 1/64" brass strip, blackened. I had thought of installing bolts, but at this scale and with only a pin vice to work with I decided against it. I did add ring bolts for the rudder chains.

 

No photos of the cannons yet - I'll save that for another post later....In the meantime, here's the rudder....Bye for now - hope you're all enjoying the weekend.

hamilton

 

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post-304-0-76132200-1374434114_thumb.jpg

 

post-304-0-02128400-1374434131_thumb.jpg

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