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Dee_Dee

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    Illinois South of the 'Cheddar Curtain'

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  1. Big Boy 4-8-8-4, came through town on it's way from Milwaukee to West Chicago. Hanging out on the tracks was a popular place to be.
  2. Vivian! Congratulations to you and your lovely bride on your wedding! May your journey in life together be blessed every day! Your sails are looking fabulous. Looking forward to seeing them added to your Red Dragon. Dee Dee
  3. Chuck, There's a fabric glue that has not been previously discussed on MSW, called "Beacon Fabri-Tac" It's used by the fashion industry, applications include costume design and gluing sequins to wedding gowns. I've experimented with it and I'm really happy with the results: It's quick drying, doesn't stain / discolor or spread like CA glue does. When it cures, there is a very slight amount of stiffening, but the fabric remains fully flexible. A plus feature of this glue, it's acid free. It comes in 2 oz, 4 oz and 8 oz bottles and mini tubes. I purchased it at JoAnne Fabrics or it can be mail ordered. https://www.beaconadhesives.com/product/fabri-tac/ Dee Dee
  4. The decking is done! To get a level decking, I did a lot of scraping with a razor blade, some light sanding with some sandpaper and a sanding sponge. Then finished up with vacuuming! I wiped on a thin coat of shellac to act as a sealer, it's easy to scrape off where needed. The black lines are reference lines for the cabin placement. I'll glue on a 'cleat' to help align the cabin. These are the cabin footprints - Ooops! The forward cabin should be flipped 180* I'm disappointed with the lumber in the kit - Almost every piece had significant saw blade marks that had to be sanded down to get a tight fit. I coated the edges with some shellac before sanding and sanded just enough to get a flat edge. The kit was designed to use 12 planks on each side, covering just under 60mm. However, since each strip had to be sanded, 12 planks left me with a 2mm gap on both sides. I did some creative press fitting to fill the gap. I still need to figure out the personality and color scheme. I've decided to not use the round portholes, instead, I'll make rectangle shaped windows and skylights. I really like what John Earl did with his pinky, check out John's pinky here and here. Thanks for stopping by. Dee Dee
  5. Yesterday, the Snowdrops started to bloom at the Chicago Botanical Gardens - Can Spring be far away?
  6. Glacial Boat Works is moving along..............slowly...................................... I made a small change with the framing for the cockpit. I lopped off a small section from bulkhead #17 (shown in yellow), and used one piece of 1/8" x 1/4" for the cockpit framing (shown in green). For the cockpit walls, I glued the pieces together, then backed each section with a strip of paper to give it some strength while sanding to size. The final height sanding was done after gluing. If you zoom in on the photo, you can see the paper backing. Silly me! I forgot to add the drain in the cockpit flooring. If I can find some thin black tubing, I'll add it. Deck Beams and Carlings The deck beams and carlings for each cabin (shown in blue) are not really needed. But if you're bashing the heck out of this build, you will need these and I suggest adding these as timo4352 did in his build here .... shown in orange. This is where I got the idea to do the cockpit as I did. The waterways are a bit 'delicate' and both broke due to the wood grain, an easy fix. Both ends needed sanding / shaping to fit the curves of the bow / stern stems and I heard a couple of 'crack's as I was gluing them on, but I don't see any cracks or lines. Phew!! Next up is planking the deck, I'll use the 1/16" x 3/32" basswood. Thanks for stopping by, questions, comments welcome. Dee Dee
  7. Hey Eamonn! It's really nice to hear from you! Hope you are well! GT may be a small craft - but it's more than twice as long as my last build, with an overall length of 29.5" / 75cm. I need to make a big space on the shelf for this one! Joshua! Thanks for stopping by. Yep! I'm an anal analytical with lexdysic tendencies. It's not supposed to be overwhelming, rather, it's meant to be a simple way to sand each plank to size. When I plank my next build, I'll try a different approach, with less analysis. Your "Prince" is looking great!
  8. Londonderry linen thread is a high quality linen thread with a smooth finish and also comes in sizes as small as 80/3 and a few colors in 100/3 and sold in small spools of 12-50m, each spool costs less than $3. It's available online from Threadneedle Street, located in Issaquah WA. Their website has numerous pages, this is the direct link to the page with the linen thread. Scroll to bottom for colors to make rope. https://www.threadneedlestreet.com/linthrd.htm There's also have a pdf guide for rigging: https://www.threadneedlestreet.com/LINEN RIGGING.pdf
  9. Kurt, I have two of these straight fairleads. They measure 12mm, made of white metal with an aged bronze plating or painting. I believe they came with the Blue Jacket 1:30 Endeavour J boat, but they were packed with two pair of oar locks that were 6mm long. If it will help, I can send these to you to make a mold / copies Also, check out this page at BlueJacket: http://www.bluejacketinc.com/fittings/fittings17.htm Dee Dee
  10. Don I like planking, but yes, it's always good to complete it. Now, I have to 'get back on the paper' and start reading the instructions and drawings............ Rob, I'm one of 'those' crazy analytical type personalities, where numbers need to make sense to me to confirm I'm staying on track. If I So if I go over the top, just tell me: "There you goes again! Getting all crazy and analytical again!" When it came time to actual planking, I keep it simple: What's the width of each plank at each bulkhead, then I wrote those numbers down on a note pad. The photo below answers that question for the eight planks of the starboard B Belt. After four planks, I redid the measurements and again wrote those numbers down. This hull was fun to plank and I hope you will still consider building Glad Tidings. Dee Dee
  11. I posted this in reply to your thread on Naval history: I built the Corel sloup kit using photos from all of the above links; I bashed the heck out of it from the very beginning. When building this kit, it became apparent that EVERY Brittany sloop is different; a lot of it depended on what is the primary fishing, oysters, lobsters, sardines, location and more. The link to my build is in my signature. A place to start is with the 'Bergère de Domrémy, hull # B 5929', a scallop dredging sloop / coquillier built in 1936. It was rebuilt and now a French National Treasure. The French An Test website contains some details and history. There's lots of info on this website. http://bergere.antest.net/le-bateau/description/ Info on Auguste Tertu, who built the Bergère de Domrémy and many other boats http://bergere.antest.net/2013/12/auguste-tertu/ Page through Sophie's link for numerous photos and good info on the Bergère de Domrémy and other sloops: http://sophie-g.net/photo/bret/brest/bergere01.htm A blog with lots of photos of Bergère de Domrémy http://www.laroyale-modelisme.net/t9662-la-bergere-de-domremy The Brittany sloop is similar to the Irish Galway and Kinsale Hooker and many other Channel / Atlantic fishing boats. More info on these Irish boats here: http://www.tradboats.ie/index.php The "Douarnenez Festival" held every other year features numerous variations on the Brittany sloop / coquillier. Here are links to photos from the 2006 and 2012 festivals. Google 'Douarnenez Festival' for more photos. 2006: http://www.pbase.com/image/65376766 2012: https://www.flickr.com/photos/valendrevarzecois/7623197092/ Videos from 2012 Douarnenez Festival https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8bwdXWwGRbY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcetV8QmPGk This Pinterest page did a good job of assembling various fishing vessels from the Channel and Atlantic coast and includes some basic drawings. https://www.pinterest.co.uk/tomedom/french-traditional-boat-types-of-the-channel-and-a/
  12. A place to start is with the 'Bergère de Domrémy, hull # B 5929', a scallop dredging sloop / coquillier built in 1936. It was rebuilt and now a French National Treasure. The French An Test website contains some details and history. There's lots of info on this website. http://bergere.antest.net/le-bateau/description/ Info on Auguste Tertu, who built the Bergère de Domrémy and many other boats http://bergere.antest.net/2013/12/auguste-tertu/ Page through Sophie's link for numerous photos and good info on the Bergère de Domrémy and other sloops: http://sophie-g.net/photo/bret/brest/bergere01.htm A blog with lots of photos of Bergère de Domrémy http://www.laroyale-modelisme.net/t9662-la-bergere-de-domremy The Brittany sloop is similar to the Irish Galway and Kinsale Hooker and many other Channel / Atlantic fishing boats. More info on these Irish boats here: http://www.tradboats.ie/index.php The "Douarnenez Festival" held every other year features numerous variations on the Brittany sloop / coquillier. Here are links to photos from the 2006 and 2012 festivals. Google 'Douarnenez Festival' for more photos. 2006: http://www.pbase.com/image/65376766 2012: https://www.flickr.com/photos/valendrevarzecois/7623197092/ Videos from 2012 Douarnenez Festival https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8bwdXWwGRbY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcetV8QmPGk This Pinterest page did a good job of assembling various fishing vessels from the Channel and Atlantic coast and includes some basic drawings. https://www.pinterest.co.uk/tomedom/french-traditional-boat-types-of-the-channel-and-a/ I built the Corel sloup kit using photos from all of the above links; I bashed the heck out of it from the very beginning. When building this kit, it became apparent that EVERY Brittany sloop is different; a lot of it depended on what is the primary fishing, oysters, lobsters, sardines, location and more.
  13. The planking is done! Yeah! After the last plank, I spent a few hours on each side with scrapers, sand paper and vacuuming! Also, mixing and adding epoxy to a few thin spots for support. Time well spent. When I started planking, I didn't have a planking plan, so belt A is different on each side. But somewhere I settled on 6 / 8 and 11 / 13. Thinking I should have had a third set of joints to break it up a bit more. The stern stem planking and the stem itself needs a little bit of filler. In the original plan, the planks at the bow stem were 3.24mm on the port side and 3.43 on the starboard side. Needless to say, I was a bit off. By the port side C belt, this measurement was down to 2.62mm. I contemplated "adding a plank" for about 10 minutes, I stayed with the plan of narrow planks. In this close up, you can see the difference in size as the planks hit the bow stem. When I did the original planking plan, I thought I was measuring correctly. To figure out where I went wrong, I 'charted' the planking plan. In the chart below, the blue line is the original planking plan - the plan flat lined for the bowstem and second bulkhead. Going back to basics, I 'smoothed' the numbers to follow the general line of the hull, the bow stem to 2.90 mm and 3.00 mm for bulkhead #2. These measurements would have been a better start until I was able to get a 'solid' measurement. OK, now I now better. THE FINAL THREE PLANKS!!!! I wanted to make sure the last plank would be easy to shape and get a tight fit. I remeasured and came up with a plan for the final plank, then worked backwards to get the measurements for the 2nd and 3rd to last planks. These measurements are highlighted in gray in the spread sheet below. In the chart, the blue line shows the smooth shape / plan of the final plank and the green line shows the wonky shape of the other two planks. It took time to get the 2nd and 3rd wonky planks shaped, but the last plank was really easy to make and fit. And THAT's the last of the charts and graphs! Need to do a bit more work on each side, then some sanding sealer and some covering to protect the hull from me adding unwanted nicks and dings in the hull. I still need to decide on paint colors Thanks for stopping by! Dee Dee
  14. Mark, Glad my build log is helpful for you. Thanks for following and please, if you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask. Dee Dee
  15. The starboard planking is done! Yeah! My thumbs were sore, but my planking fingers were working. I minimized the beveling and that solved the 'thin spots', but there are a few paper thin 'gaps' that were filled by the glue. The starboard Middle B belt was 8 planks. After the first four planks were added, I measured again. To avoid a 'skinny whiskey plank', I slightly undersized the these planks by 0.05 - 0.1mm. I added a couple of black lines to denote the individual belts and shows the difference in planking skills. Now I need to work on aligning the joints. I'll cover this side in blue tape again to prevent the basswood from eroding from handling and dinks when I drop something heavy, like a set of calipers, on the hull. To keep the blue tape from sticking, I wiped on a thin coat of poly. Below is the summary of measurements for the starboard side. With the exception of the 5th, 6th and 7th bulkhead, the measurements for the last four planks varied were within 0.40mm of the first measurement. Later today I'll start planking the port side per the plan below. This is the side where the planks for the 2nd and 3rd bulkheads are going to be thin. So this will be 'interesting........' Thanks for stopping by!

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