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Pete Jaquith

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About Pete Jaquith

  • Birthday 07/04/1943

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Indio, CA
  • Interests
    Family and friends, full size shipbuilding, marine history, scale ship models, and woodworking

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  1. With the Brig Fair American hull planking complete, construction continued with fabrication and dry fitting of the bowsprit and jibboom: Bowsprit was fabricated from 5/16” dowel stock. The bowsprit was turned on my mini-lathe using fine standing sticks. The eight sided square inner foot and the square outer end were shaped with a disk sander. Jibboom was fabricated from 1/8” dowel stock. The jibboom was turned on my mini-lathe using fine standing sticks. The outer tip was shaped with a sharp razor blade and fine sanding sticks. Next steps will continue with detailing the bowsprit and jibboom, fabricating the bowsprit bitts, and dry fitting the completed assemblies to the hull.
  2. With the Brig Fair American hull planking complete, construction continued with fabrication and installation of upper hull outfit. This work continues outfit of the bow zone: Knightheads were fabricated/dry fitted from 3/32” x 3/16” strip wood. Knighthead installations were reinforced with .025 brass pins. Timberheads were fabricated/dry fitted from 3/32” sq. stock. Timberhead installations were reinforced with .020 brass pins. Because of their delicate nature, knightheads and timberheads will be installed after cutting the bowsprit notch. Catheads and their attached timberheads will be installed after hull paint. Many fiddly little pieces here but it is starting to look like a real ship. Next steps will continue with fabrication and dry fitting of the bowsprit, bowsprit bitts, and the jibboom.
  3. Working the knightheads and timberheads. Many small fussy parts here for my eyes. I will hold off final installation until after cutting the bowsprit notch.
  4. With the Brig Fair American hull planking complete, construction continued with fabrication and installation of upper hull outfit. The next zone to be addressed was the bow zone. Note that cheek knees, head rails, and head rail knees will be addressed later in the build: P/S hull attachments were laid out in the bow zone (due to plan inaccuracies, I chose to lay out and check all bow attachments at this point). Catheads were fabricated/dry fitted from 3/16” x ¼” strip wood. The catheads are pinned in place with 3/64” dowels. The catheads will be installed after hull paint. Fore tack fairlead holes were drilled thru the forward bulwarks. A few small steps in completing upper hull outfit. Next steps will continue with the knightheads and timberheads.
  5. With the Brig Fair American hull planking complete, construction shifted to fabrication and installation of upper hull outfit. The first zone handled was the P/S hull sides: P/S hull attachments were laid out. Channels were fabricated/installed from 3/32” sheet stock. A spindle sander was used to shape the inner surfaces. Deadeyes and chain plates will be installed after hull paint. Channel caps were fabricated from 3/64” x 3/32” strip stock. The channel caps will be installed after hull paint. Chess trees were fabricated/installed from 3/32” x 3/32” strip stock. Main tack fairlead holes were then drilled thru the P/S bulwarks. Gangway steps were fabricated/installed from 1/32” x 3/32” and 3/64” x 1/16” strip stock. They were assembled with the aid of double sided scotch tape. The remaining steps will be installed after hull paint Quarter badges were dry fitted to the hull. Note that the windows still require framing out and the quarter badges will be installed after hull paint. There will be many additional details added in this zone after paint: i.e. deadeyes & chain plates, channel caps, gangway steps, quarter badges & windows, and gunport hinges for the closed aft gunport. Next steps will continue with upper hull outfit.
  6. After a few months of full scale shipbuilding activities, I am returning the my "Fair American" build. I am currently working on P/S hull attachments including channels, gangway steps, quarter badges, chess trees, and main/fore tack fairlead holes. Description and pictures to follow. My full scale activities included a recent SNAME/ASNE webinar on modern "Asian Warship Design, Production Engineering, and Construction Practice". Over 500 attendees and many interesting questions, all in an attempt to influence USN design and acquisition practice. Regards from the shipyard, Pete
  7. your painting is great.  What is your procedure on painting and what type of paints are you using.  I am very confused

    1. Pete Jaquith

      Pete Jaquith

      Rolo,

       

      I have used both Model Masters and Model Shipways (thinned) acrylic paints.  I try to manage the build to hold off trim, small pieces, etc. until after painting to get a sharp paint line.  My "Fair American" will require masking for hull painting.

       

      Pete

      Image0163.JPG

      image0209.jpg

    2. Rolo

      Rolo

      Thank you that clears up a lot for me

  8. Rolo, My build logs here on MSW for the Topsail Schooner Eagle and Brigantine Newsboy show pictures of hull planking and coppering for both the scratch built Eagle and machine carved Newsboy hulls. Pete
  9. With the Brig Fair American hull planking complete, the next step was building a construction cradle. The cradle was designed to hold the hull upright with the waterline parallel to baseline. The construction cradle was lined with peel-and-stick felt tape. With hull planking complete, construction will now focus on external hull outfit. The hull outfit sequence has been designed to facilitate painting and minimize potential handling damage. Hull outfit prior to paint includes channels and gangway steps; dry fitting the quarter badges; chess trees, fairlead and hawse holes; catheads, knightheads, and timberheads; cheek knees, bleak head, and transom trim; and cutting the bowsprit notch. At the same time, I also plan to fabricate and dry fit the bowsprit and start fabrication of deck furniture. These assemblies will be held off for painting with their installation sequenced to ensure good access for cannon rigging. Regards from the shipyard, Pete Jaquith
  10. Dwight, Correct, I used two steel rulers as guides/restraints as I pushed on opposite corners to deform the window frames to follow the transom curve.
  11. With the Brig Fair American hull planking complete, the next step is confirming the pedestal fit. The pedestals had been initially fitted to the keel subassembly. At this point, they required minor adjustment to suit the hull planking. This task was accomplished at this point to avoid the need for adjustment at completion. Next steps include: (a) building a construction cradle. Regards from the shipyard, Pete Jaquith
  12. With the Brig Fair American garboard and broad strakes, and lower “A”, “B”, and “D” Belt planking complete; a major construction milestone was completed: “C” Belt Strakes #9-12 – The third four strakes below wales (#9-12) were the last strakes installed. Note that lower “C” Belt strake #12 was the closing strake. These planks were ~9” wide amidships tapering to ~6” wide at the stem and 13-15” wide at the stern post. Fair Planking – After completion of planking (a major milestone), limited wood filler was used to fill a few open seams and the hull was lightly sanded using fine sanding sticks. Lessons learned from hull planking include: Layout of planking belts and strakes is key Proportional dividers are great for dividing up planking belts Shaped planks were cut from sheet stock using ships curves (I may try Chuck’s heat bending technique on my next project) Fine sanding sticks from the beauty supply shop are great for fine tuning planks Filling the forward/after hull bays with basswood blocks provided need planking support Planks were edge glued with white glue – to date despite 7 years of storage and significant temperature and humidity swings from southern NH to the CA desert (60-100 degrees F and 15-90% humidity) I have not had any cracking or open seams. Next steps include: (a) confirming pedestal fit. Regards from the shipyard, Pete Jaquith
  13. Greg, Plan sections, elevations, and details appear to be slightly different scales. Also, bulkheads were poorly cut and were often different P/S. This requires great care be could be a frustration to new modelers. This is part of the reason I added bass wood fillers between the FWD/AFT bulkheads. Regards, Pete
  14. Thanks for your interest and likes. After 7 years away I am now starting to get back into ship modeling. Still have to sort of the rest of my tools and supplies but I am getting there. The Brig Fair American is a good looking model, but the kit has problems (bulkheads don't fair, bulwark height, etc.). I would not recommend it as a first build. Regards, Pete

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