Jump to content
w1cdo

REVENGE by John Maguire - Amati/Victory Models - build in the Cougar Mountain Shipyard

Recommended Posts

post-661-0-04371500-1456875073_thumb.jpg

 

I have been closely following Martin and Dennis's REVENGE build logs - actually, their work was the reason I bought the ship. Awareness also exists that Apollo, Titanic87 and Malcolm are also building. 

 

Minimal experience on my part is the reason for this log. With so many advanced builders ahead of me it is my sincere hope that showing my work will invoke critiques and advance warnings for difficulties/traps that lie in my next to come steps.

 

My kit was purchased from the California distributor the week before Christmas. Next there are comments following an inventory of the large components. Comparison to kits already in the field might indicate if changes are being made by Amati.I am not sure if I'll try to inventory the tiny pieces. Here are my notes:

 

post-661-0-91123300-1456875212_thumb.jpg

 

Inventory item 38: can’t find the part and can't find it in the step by step instruction.

 

Inventory item 251: should be 1x5x600 but is 1x4x600

 

Inventory item 39: supplied as two pieces not one - 39A and 39B

 

Inventory item 49: calls for 2 pieces  but only one required

 

Inventory item 121: calls for 4 but find 5

 

Inventory item 149: calls for 14 but have 16

 

Inventory item 153: calls for 14 but have 16

 

Inventory item 174: calls for 4 but have 5

 

Inventory item 188A and 233 are the same

 

Inventory item 197: supplied as 2 pieces not one - 197A and 197B

 

Respectfully,

John

Total Time 8 hours

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Mike.
 
Thank you Elijah and thank you for the "Likes" from so many friendly souls .  .  .  .
 
As noted by others, the pieces making up the hull were easily freed from their respective billets. I did a test dry fit and was pleased to see the precision of their fit. Snug, enough room for a thin application of glue but no significant slop.

 

post-661-0-53815900-1457045863_thumb.jpg

 
In my dry fit frame 4 and the aft deck each seem to fit correctly without modifications. Others reported necessary tweaking. With that knowledge I spent two days trying to decide if I was missing something I should be seeing but in the end could find no reason to make adjustments.
 
post-661-0-88899500-1457045934_thumb.jpg
 
 
post-661-0-73867600-1457045971_thumb.jpg
 
 
The forward frames were chamfered until a pleasant lay of a test plank was achieved.
 
post-661-0-79968100-1457046013_thumb.jpg
 
The test dry fitting positioned the frames so perfectly that I opted to glue the central several frames in place by using the two decks above them to maintain what seems to be a perfect relationship. Unconventional I believe but doing so keeps the frames in perfect alignment with no wiggle room whatsoever. The decks were not glued, only the frames to the keel.
 
post-661-0-08522000-1457046069_thumb.jpg
 
The glue is drying and the wine cellar is calling my name .  .  .  .
 
Respectfully,
John
Total Time 14 hours

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

David: welcome aboard! I'm really pleased to see your smiling face again.

 

Elijah, those REVENGE builders ahead of me, whom I am attentively following also mention the excellent fits.

 

Doc, in my case the proxy server didn't pass the MSW notifications. I fixed it by putting my real address in MSW.

 

Many thanks to the kind folks adding "Likes".

 

Several small steps over the past few days, each time consuming.

 

Having not a lot of experience with my air brush it took me two days to obtain a finish on the brass hatches and wood frames that I am satisfied with. Setup/knockdown of the tabletop spray booth, cleanup and giving the Iwata airbrush the cleanup it deserves is a long process. But gosh, the Iwata is an object of mechanical art and the paint application leaves nothing to be desired. The shiny spot on the lower left painted grate is a light reflection. Paint coverage is excellent.

 

post-661-0-23518500-1457313466_thumb.jpg

 

Following the lead of Martin and Denis, I laid out three decks for planking.

 

post-661-0-85457800-1457312544_thumb.jpg

 

This is a dry fit to lay out one of the planked decks.

 

post-661-0-08225600-1457312746_thumb.jpg

 

The lower deck is in two pieces. If it was one piece it would still be possible to mount it. I have laid it out on a thick glass plate and joined the two halves with 60 minute epoxy. Here it is seen clamped and weighted for overnight curing. Once the epoxy cures I'll plank the deck while it is on the glass plate then mount it in the hull.

 

post-661-0-50272700-1457312962_thumb.jpg

 

Respectfully,

John

Total Time 24 hours

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ahoy John

 

My only concern is the MDF. It looks like it will be weak where the frames thin out on the tops. I have a hard time thinking that they will be strong eniugh when you start planking,but I guess that with the flat sides up high that it might not be a factor-hope it's not for you.

 

I would hate to spend that much on a kit and have MDF for the bulkheads and frames. They are getting cheaper all the time,and where they should not.Just my opinion. Even tho it's hard to work with,I would prefer the hard plywood that Caldercraft has used.

 

MDF is for Ikea and basswood bulkheads is for the birds. Too weak for my liking.

 

Keith

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi John

 

Are you caulking your plank edges with ink or pencil or not at all ??.

 

When you do glue the planks on do one from start to finish ( don't leave a gap ) and make sure that the width of each strip is the same width then start the next strip and so on and so on.

 

You will have to plank over the mast holes etc, make sure you put a pencil mark were they are so you know were to start to cut them out when glue has dried.

 

Denis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi John,

 

Your paint finishes looks very even and I like the color...be interesting to see it against the decking.

 

Enjoying following along....I really like how this model looks and goes together.

 

Cheers,

 

Nigel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice progress, John.  The kit looks to be really high quality...something I may consider in the future, once I clear the decks of the multiple projects ahead of it in the queue!  Keep up the great work. 

 

BTW:  What's in the glass?  Bordeaux?  A Tuscan red?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Keith, thank you for looking in and commenting. Your thoughts on MDF mirror all the others ahead of me building this kit. I have no background to qualify making my own statement. I will say, as have the others, that they have had no complaints once they began working with it. The density is greater than normal MDF that I have seen at Home Depot so it handles similar to wood - at least to me. The high extensions on the frames are to temporarily stiffen the large thin ply that supports the colorful decorative patterns. Once those are in place and their supporting  upper decks, the delicate pieces are cut off and thrown away so they are not a permanent structural feature. I have only built one other kit and the quality of both wood, parts and particularly the way they fit with such precision in this kit impresses me, albeit I don't have a notable background.

 

Denis, I am using a pencil for the plank edges. When I dry fit them to establish the pattern prior to glue, I photographed it and have been using the picture as a guide, which of course is patterned after your and Martin's work with the one for four layout.  During the dry fit, I had a slightly unequal port to starboard width issue. As a result of that, as I work away from the centerline using my photograph for guidance, doing the full length front to back runs I am qualifying the width of the port/stbd planks before fitting, then after installation measuring with my digital caliper the distance from the outboard edge of each row to the frame notches to ensure port/stbd symmetry. The plan is that this will bring the outermost planks port/stbd to the identical relative positions to the frame notches. So far, so good. Wordy, but having done it yourself I'm sure you get the drift. Thank you for your detailed and thoughtful inputs - I need them. Your description for a half round file to chamfer the stern concave frames was perfect. I have previously used sandpaper on a rounded block. The file is so much better.

 

This planking is old hat to all of you but fun for me doing it the first time after reading your hundreds of builds.

 

post-661-0-55863300-1457418971_thumb.jpg

 

post-661-0-34948000-1457418980_thumb.jpg

 

Nigel, thank you. I do not have an artists eye for color. I think my limit is generality only. I looked at colors on the shelf and picked the darkest opaque brown that I have thinking it reminded me of walnut.  Inexperience with the airbrush caused me to initially think I was not covering grain patterns in the wood frames but successive applications of fog thick coats of paint eventually did the trick. The coverage of the brass hatches was very much to my satisfaction, again the result of perhaps a dozen coats of what I am calling fog thick. Particularly satisfying to me was that this was the first time I have been really pleased with the air brush experience.

 

Doc, I love the kit. The laser cutting precision is breath taking. Then, consider the retaining tabs that are so tiny that a razor blade is all I have to use to free even the largest 5MM thick pieces. There is a world of difference between this and what I have recently been working on. I am in love .  .  . As far as the contents of the glass, Doc, I'm not sure if I was drinking some of my four hundred year old cognac or if it was Charles Shaw merlot .  .  .

 

The last couple of days have been spent studying the manual and Martin & Denis's work and using that to begin planking the lowermost deck.  As you all know having brilliant pathfinders out front who create museum quality models to look at and study is an asset.  

 

Working on the lowermost deck I had two rows each side of center when the shipyard workers headed for the pub after work tonight.

 

Thank you to the many kind souls with their "Likes". I am really enjoying this build,

 

Respectfully,

John Maguire

Total Time 30 hours

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi John

 

If you are going to use a pencil I would go for a 6B or higher like a 9B depending how dark you wish to have the caulking lines.

The only thing with using a pencil is when you sand the planks down some times the pencil will rub into the plank making them look grey.

If you use a pencil some times you can make the edges of the plank uneven by pressing on the edge.

 

That is why I use a Zig felt tipped marker pen, it is quick and because it has a felt tip it will not damage the edge of the plank.

 

 

Denis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Denis, thanks for that info. At the moment I have finished the lower deck but plan to wait until tomorrow after the glue has some time to cure before I begin to clean it up. I'll see how it works out and implement your suggestion for the next deck.

 

Here it is still in the rough on my plate of 1/2" glass with weights on it overnight.  I'll see how it looks when I clean it up. How do I keep the felt tip pen from bleeding  too much ink into the wood and seeing it spread.

 

Would it work to tightly clamp several planks together and blacken the combined edges with the felt tip pen? Would you anticipate too much bleed away from the edge?

 

post-661-0-36151400-1457484488_thumb.jpg

 

I went back into all my previous posts and added "Total Time" entries. I'll continue the tally going forward.

 

Respectfully,

John

Total Time 36 hours

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi John

I did my planking one at a time but it is very quick.

The ink don't seep into the wood like you think it would do, only a little on the end grain of the plank.

 

I find the Zig felt pen a lot better than pencil, you get them from an art shop, they cost about $5.99nz.

I have used 4 of them so far.

But it is up to you.

 

Denis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For simulated caulking I've started using black acrylic paint.  Gang the planks together and hold them with clamps and paint the edges.  There will be a little bleed through on to the surface of the plank that is easily scraped away with the edge of an X-Acto  blade.  No sanding mess, no "gray" planks from pigment getting into the planks surface.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dave

 

Like I said it is what you are happy with.

 

With this kit not only are the widths of the planks different sizes the thickness are different also.

 

So you will have to sand them.

Even if they are all the same thickness don't you sand them anyway ??.

 

Denis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Denis:  You have to sand the planks once installed so the deck, hull or bulwarks are smooth.  The advantage to the acrylic is that you don't get the "gray dust" that you get with graphite or charcoal is used to simulate caulking.  That stuff gets sanded into the pores of the wood, discoloring it.  Not as big a problem with holly or maple as with softer woods like aspen or basswood, but still a mess.  Scrape the acrylic with an X-Acto blade, install the plank and sand away!  No "gray dust".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Denis:  You have to sand the planks once installed so the deck, hull or bulwarks are smooth.  The advantage to the acrylic is that you don't get the "gray dust" that you get with graphite or charcoal is used to simulate caulking.  That stuff gets sanded into the pores of the wood, discoloring it.  Not as big a problem with holly or maple as with softer woods like aspen or basswood, but still a mess.  Scrape the acrylic with an X-Acto blade, install the plank and sand away!  No "gray dust".

Hi Dave

Yes I know all that and thank you for your reply, if you have read my log I sand down, apply 1-2 coats of sanding sealer, sand down, apply 2-3 coats of satin varnish, sanding each coat with 320 the last sanding is with 420 grit, after each sanding I vac the planks before coating with the varnish.

 

The only problem with acrylic paint you have to wait for the paint to dry, it all so can be a bit messy.

That is why I use the Zig hard felt tipped marker pens, very easy to use, drys in seconds.

I have to say this I DON'T know what they are like if you use a water base varnish as I use a oil or like some people say a solvent base varnish.

 

 

Denis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Denis and Dave, thank you for the edging suggestions. Yesterday I tried both techniques and like them equally, then prepped possibly enough 100 mm planks to do the next two decks. The just completed lower deck is satisfactory to my eye but of course gets not quite the best grades with close photography - you know what the camera discovers! Tests with your techniques look to produce a superior finish and will be used going forward.

 

Big John, thanks for looking in. This project is really fun. I am pleased with the fit and the quality of components. I just may end up working my way well into my wine cellar before there is a mantle worthy product.

 

I put perhaps eight coats of matte varnish on the deck with a steel wool rub down in-between each application. Prior to final installation the deck was given one last steel wool rubdown to give it a weathered appearance. The area below the hatches was painted dark brown but to no avail because it is not visible.

 

I like the unusual detail on the hatch tops not withstanding prior valid comments that in real life those details could present a tripping hazard. Once painted I am challenged to see if the openings aren't square.

 

post-661-0-39462900-1457655420_thumb.jpg

 

This was a test dry fit.

 

post-661-0-98190500-1457655484_thumb.jpg

 

A permanent home for the lower deck. It now sits firmly on the applicable frames and the false keel.

 

post-661-0-49317900-1457655541_thumb.jpg

 

Respectfully,

John Maguire

Total Time 44 hours

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing like a good desktop building project like that to assault the wine cellar...I have been going around the site here and some amazing builds...I also see a lot of improvised weights and such for holding things in place...I was thinking that a few Mallory plugs (Tungsten), crank shaft balancing, in various sizes would be a great addition to many a builders toolbox...iron is about 8 grams per CC and Mallory 18...really dense and compact...just a thought...

Build looks great and enjoying following along...I have to find me a Tug Boat...;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Doc, Elijah and John.

 

I used the new plank edging suggestion and liked it, particularly because it didn't damage the plank edge the way I was with a pencil. The completed job looks better. Thank you men.

 

Two days of a few hours a day finished off one more deck. It has two coats of varnish now, more to follow.

 

Presently in Montana for the week - the shipyard is shut down.

 

post-661-0-83255400-1457899328_thumb.jpeg

 

Respectfully,

John Maguire

Total Time 52 hours

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your deck looks great! Enjoy the vacation I can't say I've ever been to Montana, but I hear there are mountains. I haven't seen mountains in a while, being from Illinois. I look forward to your return!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...