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Hi All,

 

Over the years I have read numerous topics and posts regarding many aspects on the differences in the characteristics of different species of wood. I read a lot how different woods cut, finish, the colors and other variables. I don't recall seeing any topics on which species bend the easiest, or which can be bent into the tightest curves. Which can be bent just using heat and which need special handling.

 

In my next build, the New Bedford Whale Boat, I plan on doing substantial substitution on the kit supplied basswood. I plan on only painting below the wales and to use different woods of contrasting color for other areas. So far I plan to use, cherry, walnut, holly, castillo box, and maple. I would like to use one of the last three for the ribs but I have no idea of which can be bent into the required curve.

 

I'm sure this is an area in which a lot of folks out there have a great deal to share. Thanks in advance.

 

Best,

John

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Thanks David and Vincent,

 

I appreciate your input. I hope that over time more builders will add their thoughts. At some point it would be nice to hear about relative characteristics, e.g. which is more bendable for the same sized plank, walnut or cherry? castillo or holly?

 

I also thought I would share my inspiration for this build. It is in the Gallery of Completed Models and built by "greatgallions". He really fif a great job.

 

post-18302-0-88646800-1473122175.jpeg

 

 

Best,

John

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Over the years I have seen many open boats. Launches. Lifeboats, Whaleboats etc.  And many of them used holly or beech for the frames. I remember one modeler who used yew that he harvested from near his place.  I have been a fan of beech when I can find it because of it's flexibility and for the look after finishing.

David B

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If you can find it, Loquat wood is the very best. It is pear colored, it is uniform, it takes a boxwood-like cut, and it bends without complaint. There is no other wood like it. It was planted here in South Florida by retirees over the course of many decades. Sadly, younger people are having them cleared out. It has light grey bark, and small clusters of grape sized fruit.  

 

Roman Barzana, modeler-extraordinaire of Tampa, enlightened me about Loquat. :)

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