Jump to content

Pinky schooner GLAD TIDINGS (1937) by shipphotographer.com - FINISHED - Model Shipways - Scale 1:24 - just a christmas present


Recommended Posts

1033779402_069-.thumb.jpg.2770477bdbf22bb28db8af5845a8f14e.jpg

1830503722_080-.thumb.jpg.e6d669b599d41586f4e92828fb3b4d24.jpg

179267346_084-.thumb.jpg.99788a10e7b2a5d0dc587665e41df900.jpg1411376605_088-.thumb.jpg.933b53161d8d68e6ee9cab68b47d46b0.jpg875693943_090-.thumb.jpg.ae20fe390622123b72ab8d03acd09dbe.jpg

After dry-fitting the deck houses, I began gluing the deck planking with black-tinted glue to simulate the caulking. I made sure that the deck houses did not get glued to them at this stage. After completing this step, I removed the deck houses and sanded the deck with 150-grit sanding paper. I simulated nails with the help of CA glue. I marked the nails, drilled them with .35 mm drill, poured CA over this and sanded the deck for the second time (first with 150-gritt, then with fine, 400-gritt sandpaper). The CA also added definition to the planking seams. Although the kit did not contain one, I added a scupper at the bottom of the cockpit. I finished the deck with two coats of tung oil.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, shipphotographer.com said:

Although the kit did not contain one, I added a scupper at the bottom of the cockpit.

Normally, there would be two drain pipe holes in a cockpit like that one, placed at opposite corners port and starboard. Below, the drain pipes would be crossed, so that the port hole pipe drained to the starboard side and the starboard pipe ran to the port side. This permitted the cockpit to drain completely on either tack. With a single drain in the middle of the cockpit, when the vessel heeled, the lower side of the cockpit would not drain below the center hole. 

 

Also, the run of the deck planking is very unusual. Was this as portrayed in the plans? Usually, deck planking will never butt adjacent to another butt. There will not be straight lines of butts across the deck from port to starboard. That is a structurally weak assembly and also difficult to caulk and keep watertight. 

 

These are minor notes, but perhaps of help for future reference.

 

Very nice, crisp work! Excellent detail work on the hinged skylight.  Thanks for sharing it with us.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

I noticed that you covered the deck planks with thin CA and then sanded the deck. After that you applied Tung Oil to the deck. Why do you use thin CA on the deck and then sand it? Doesn't the CA seal the wood and prevent the Tung Oil from penetrating the wood? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Nirvana said:

Olha,
Aren't you a little concerned about the balance of the finished ship once everything is attached? 

Specially using one single pedestal.
Besides that your Glad Tidings looks really nice.
 

Yes, you are right! That is why I reinforced the keel with two pieces of maplewood!
And it is very light model. 

502584008_005-.thumb.jpg.ed793161067cfb4dbfc65fad8e20ae0f.jpg

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, BobG said:

I noticed that you covered the deck planks with thin CA and then sanded the deck. After that you applied Tung Oil to the deck. Why do you use thin CA on the deck and then sand it? Doesn't the CA seal the wood and prevent the Tung Oil from penetrating the wood? 

The CA sealed the wood and added definition to the planking seams. 
When the pores of the wood are closed - tinting paints and dyes lie in an even color, not dirty it, as is often the case without a base. 
And, as it turned out in Connecticut near the ocean, there is very high humidity in the summer, the CA does not allow the wood to shrink or expand width the humidity. It's a pity that I found out about it too late, because then I would have covered with CA the casing (Now, as result of moisture expansion, the planks have squeezed out the PVA glue. During the heating season, this was a perfectly even surface). Now I making the masts and will seal them with SA...

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, shipphotographer.com said:

The CA sealed the wood and added definition to the planking seams.

I thought that the Tung Oil needs to be able to penetrate the wood. How does it do that if the wood is sealed? Is the Tung Oil more like a polish and does not need to penetrate the wood? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...