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Pen Duick by BobG - Artesania Latina - 1:28

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I've been on a little hiatus since I completed my Medway Longboat a few weeks ago and I have been mulling over too many choices of what to build next. I have 10 models on the shelf which is way too many and, in addition to those, I was considering the Cheerful by Syren and the Lady Isabella by Vanguard. The Cheerful will have to wait since Chuck is temporarily closed and having problems with the USPS and the Byrnes table saw I was going to get is temporarily out of stock due to a shortage of 120V motors. I decided to wait on the Lady Isabella too since I would like to try my hand at weathering a working vessel like the Lady Isabella and I want to learn to use my airbrush before I dive into that kind of a build

 

So that left me deciding on a model that I already have and two of them kept drawing my attention: the Pride of Baltimore II by Model Shipways and the Pen Duick by Artesania Latina. I had picked up the AL model of the Pen Duick last year on eBay. It was out of production and, of course, AL is no more. After looking over the 3 Pen Duick build logs here on MSW and reading more about its owner, Eric Tabarly, and his phenomenal history racing the Pen Duick, my interest in her grew and she got the nod. It will also give me a chance to learn to use my airbrush that was a Christmas gift from my wife this year.

 

There have been a series of 6 Pen Duick ocean racing yachts. The original Pen Duick, a gaff rigged cutter, was built in Ireland in 1898. Eric Tabarly's father acquired her in 1938 when Eric was 7 years old and taught him how to sail on her. Eric went on to become one of the most legendary, long distance racing sailors in the history of the sport winning and setting records in transatlantic and transpacific races among many others. The Pen Duick eventually fell into disrepair and the hull rotted after World War II. Eric began restoring her in 1956 and completed the restoration in 1958 with a new polyester resin hull. Tragically, Eric Tabarly drowned in the Irish Sea on the night of June 12-13, 1998, when he was knocked overboard by a spar. His body was recovered by the trawler An Yvidig on July 20. 

 

Eric Tabarly in 1990:

 

1070990678_ScreenShot2020-05-07at5_53_37PM.thumb.png.136f05f24f5736ce41bc479cca2f70b1.png

The Pen Duick:

1586958620_ScreenShot2020-05-07at5_05_28PM.thumb.png.9ef66c0aecb6097c10f330ae6300b971.png

 

The AL model of the Pen Duick is based on the boat after she was restored in 1958. I found the materials nicely packaged and everything appears to be there although I haven't inventoried it yet. 

 

IMG_2778.thumb.JPG.1fe5d13b2b73b5eab2f8af0549c01341.JPG

The false keel and bulkheads are nice plywood and the laser cutting is clean. There are also some mahogany laser cut parts.

 

IMG_5217.thumb.JPG.d3c21c8aa4d1c5573237e1f6fc8ba54d.JPG

Planking strips of ramin and mahogany along with some African walnut dowels for the mast etc.

IMG_8505.thumb.JPG.03104ff372f410b6f082073f41d7a04c.JPG 

The brass fittings are very nice and there are some white metal fittings and brass strips. The belaying pins are the typical, ugly, bulbous ones that are in so many kits. I'm sure I'll end up making new ones and I will probably replace the blocks and rope with some from Syren.IMG_4368.thumb.JPG.24709adbee65b7a6cef71ff71a154852.JPG

The sails leave a lot to be desired and they don't match up in size with the plans. I might have to learn how to sew....

 

IMG_7773.thumb.JPG.8a1c726fc0d40186d62aadd389840863.JPG

There are two, large, double sided sets of plans and they appear to be 1:1 but that is not indicated on the plans. The sails certainly do not match up with the plans either; they're too small.

IMG_9824.thumb.JPG.b140fc7e8d320443535c4c72ddd42422.JPGIMG_0573.thumb.JPG.d15865e1cff867b91e1319fb78474050.JPGIMG_3866.thumb.JPG.a62991a206eb6a8a7e60a88baec83fbf.JPG

The instructions are in several languages including English but they are very brief. The instructional photos are a bit more help but I'll still be flying by the seat of my pants trying to figure things out.

IMG_8476.thumb.JPG.169be0cc95bdbd5d78caba1d7e35e5ab.JPG

I want to try and do the deck planking with joggles as shown below. The kit simply has a straight piece of mahogany laid down the middle of the boat from the stem to the stern. The build by hof00 here on MSW was done this way and he explains how he did it. I think it will be tough to get all those joggles laid out and cut correctly and to be able to plank the deck so it's symmetrical on both sides. This will be a long shot for me but I'll give it a go and see how big of a mess I can make....

IMG_9423.thumb.JPG.a17e8d4889ac91c4849cbf45a0419f47.JPG

I picked up this used book on eBay hoping that it would have some nice photos in it but it's more about the various versions of the Pen Duick and their racing history. It is a very good read though.

IMG_9838.thumb.JPG.4a1dbeb97aa8e8b41eb09311e67ae92b.JPG

I have the feeling, for whatever reason, that this build may turn into a rather directionless adventure for me. I hope some of you will take an interest in following along and, perhaps, steer me in the right direction when you see me veering off into the abyss.

 

So here we go...

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I’m in Bob. Looking forward to your build of this. I’ll be rooting for you on those joggles!

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Yup,

Looking forward also.

Pleased you picked up on the Sails....

Be careful with the Dowell measurements, there is no extra catered for.

Also, take care with the Centre Mahogany Plank, If your going to Joggle, make the Cross Grain cuts with a Razor Saw, in fact, all the Mahogany parts are extremely brittle....

 

I "Articulated" the Skylights, just something different.... 🙂

 

Trying to find the Joggling that I copied from another modeller…..

 

Tomorrow perhaps.

 

Cheers,

 

Harry.

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Excellent choice of a legendary boat, on a kit most definitely a member of the endangered species models.

 

Yves

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7 hours ago, hof00 said:

Looking forward also.

Pleased you picked up on the Sails....

Be careful with the Dowell measurements, there is no extra catered for.

Also, take care with the Centre Mahogany Plank, If your going to Joggle, make the Cross Grain cuts with a Razor Saw, in fact, all the Mahogany parts are extremely brittle....

Thanks so much for your replies and the helpful information. I'm off to a bit of a slow start since summer is here now and there's lots of yard work and I'm out on my bike a lot. Your build of the Pen Duick is one of the reasons I selected to attempt this model.

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5 hours ago, yvesvidal said:

Excellent choice of a legendary boat, on a kit most definitely a member of the endangered species models.

Thanks, Yves, I'm moving rather slowly getting this build going but I should be able to get some time at my modeling desk pretty soon. I've been cleaning up my work area and trying to get things more organized after the completion of my Medway Longboat. 

 

I've been reading more about Eric Tabarly and the Pen Duick and have been watching quite a few videos about him and this legendary sailboat. It has really piqued my interest in his life and the history of the the Pen Duick. I hope I can do as good a job building this beautiful model as it justifies. It will be challenging for me since I've still got a long way to go in the development my modeling skills.

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Built same kit about twenty years ago, found it at the Ft Myers flea market. Couldn't resist it.

Researching for more details on Pen Duick found a beautiful book, unforutunetely in French,

of watercolors and detailed sketches of hardware, deck furnature and interior details. My attempt at

Goggle translation is that it's a logbook of watercolors of Pen Duick under different sailing conditions.

Title is "Pen Duick" by Marc p. G.Berthier, published by Gallimard, Oct 2001. ISBN 2-74-240779-0. Hope thats right.

Artwork and sketches are useful for detailed model work.

Bıridgman Bob

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Hi Chap,

All the best with your build.

 

I'll be on-line at our temporary accommodation in Taranaki for the next four weeks or so before we take possession of our new property, early June, so, I'll have some time on my hands to assist if I can.

(interesting that I saw your build log last night, my Pen Duick is my last Ship Model to be "Crated" by the removal company today.)

 

A few Videos that you may have seen already….

 

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=pen+duick&&view=detail&mid=C14908C78CA25C11217EC14908C78CA25C11217E&&FORM=VRDGAR

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=pen+duick&&view=detail&mid=4FF9B7C7C6B7889AA39C4FF9B7C7C6B7889AA39C&&FORM=VRDGAR

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=pen+duick&&view=detail&mid=2C78B6E807DD3F8FED552C78B6E807DD3F8FED55&&FORM=VRDGAR

 

Cheers....HOF.

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1 hour ago, bridgman said:

Built same kit about twenty years ago, found it at the Ft Myers flea market. Couldn't resist it.

Researching for more details on Pen Duick found a beautiful book, unforutunetely in French,

of watercolors and detailed sketches of hardware, deck furnature and interior details. My attempt at

Goggle translation is that it's a logbook of watercolors of Pen Duick under different sailing conditions.

Title is "Pen Duick" by Marc p. G.Berthier, published by Gallimard, Oct 2001. ISBN 2-74-240779-0. Hope thats right.

Artwork and sketches are useful for detailed model work.

Bıridgman Bob

Hi Bob, thanks for your post and information. I actually tried to find this book after reading about somewhere on this forum. I believe it was from a post of yours some time ago. Anyway, I recently found a used copy on eBay and ordered it. The book was located in Germany and they tried to mail it but, for some reason, the German post office had a problem with sending it so the eBayer sent me a refund. I'd like to find a copy of it somewhere.

 

I'd love to see some photos of your model. She's such a gorgeous sailboat!

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1 hour ago, hof00 said:

Hi Chap,

All the best with your build.

 

I'll be on-line at our temporary accommodation in Taranaki for the next four weeks or so before we take possession of our new property, early June, so, I'll have some time on my hands to assist if I can.

(interesting that I saw your build log last night, my Pen Duick is my last Ship Model to be "Crated" by the removal company today.)

Hi Harry, thanks very much and thanks for the video links. She's a beautiful sailboat for sure!

 

I must say, you live in one of the most beautiful and friendly countries I've ever had the pleasure to visit. My wife and I spent 4 weeks traveling in New Zealand in 1985. We rented a camper van and drove from the tip off the north island to the bottom of the south island and absolutely loved it. We flew out of Christchurch on Christmas Day to Tahiti where we arrived for a second Christmas Day on Bora Bora! Then we spent 17 days in French Polynesia on 4 different islands. I even got to got to do several shark dives on the coral atoll of Rangiroa.  It was one of our favorite and most memorable trips ever. 

 

I hope your move goes smoothly and thanks again for looking in on my build log. I should be able to get something done on the model in the next week. Cheers!

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Thanks to Harry (hof00) for the links to the Pen Duick videos. This one really captures the beauty of this sailboat and look at the amount of canvass they have up on her and how far she can heel over under all that canvass!

 

 

 

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Hi Chap,

Sounds like you had a great "Road Trip!!"

With the log I sent you yesterday, (Page 2 - 3), if you print the Deck pictures, (A4), it should be pretty close to the Model Deck dimensions, from memory....

Joggling on the centre can be more accurately calculated.

Anyway, all the best and I'll keep an eye out.

 

Cheers....HOF.

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On 5/7/2020 at 9:18 PM, BobG said:

I've been on a little hiatus since I completed my Medway Longboat a few weeks ago and I have been mulling over too many choices of what to build next. I have 10 models on the shelf which is way too many and, in addition to those, I was considering the Cheerful by Syren and the Lady Isabella by Vanguard. The Cheerful will have to wait since Chuck is temporarily closed and having problems with the USPS and the Byrnes table saw I was going to get is temporarily out of stock due to a shortage of 120V motors. I decided to wait on the Lady Isabella too since I would like to try my hand at weathering a working vessel like the Lady Isabella and I want to learn to use my airbrush before I dive into that kind of a build

 

So that left me deciding on a model that I already have and two of them kept drawing my attention: the Pride of Baltimore II by Model Shipways and the Pen Duick by Artesania Latina. I had picked up the AL model of the Pen Duick last year on eBay. It was out of production and, of course, AL is no more. After looking over the 3 Pen Duick build logs here on MSW and reading more about its owner, Eric Tabarly, and his phenomenal history racing the Pen Duick, my interest in her grew and she got the nod. It will also give me a chance to learn to use my airbrush that was a Christmas gift from my wife this year.

 

There have been a series of 6 Pen Duick ocean racing yachts. The original Pen Duick, a gaff rigged cutter, was built in Ireland in 1898. Eric Tabarly's father acquired her in 1938 when Eric was 7 years old and taught him how to sail on her. Eric went on to become one of the most legendary, long distance racing sailors in the history of the sport winning and setting records in transatlantic and transpacific races among many others. The Pen Duick eventually fell into disrepair and the hull rotted after World War II. Eric began restoring her in 1956 and completed the restoration in 1958 with a new polyester resin hull. Tragically, Eric Tabarly drowned in the Irish Sea on the night of June 12-13, 1998, when he was knocked overboard by a spar. His body was recovered by the trawler An Yvidig on July 20. 

 

Eric Tabarly in 1990:

 

1070990678_ScreenShot2020-05-07at5_53_37PM.thumb.png.136f05f24f5736ce41bc479cca2f70b1.png

The Pen Duick:

1586958620_ScreenShot2020-05-07at5_05_28PM.thumb.png.9ef66c0aecb6097c10f330ae6300b971.png

 

The AL model of the Pen Duick is based on the boat after she was restored in 1958. I found the materials nicely packaged and everything appears to be there although I haven't inventoried it yet. 

 

IMG_2778.thumb.JPG.1fe5d13b2b73b5eab2f8af0549c01341.JPG

The false keel and bulkheads are nice plywood and the laser cutting is clean. There are also some mahogany laser cut parts.

 

IMG_5217.thumb.JPG.d3c21c8aa4d1c5573237e1f6fc8ba54d.JPG

Planking strips of ramin and mahogany along with some African walnut dowels for the mast etc.

IMG_8505.thumb.JPG.03104ff372f410b6f082073f41d7a04c.JPG 

The brass fittings are very nice and there are some white metal fittings and brass strips. The belaying pins are the typical, ugly, bulbous ones that are in so many kits. I'm sure I'll end up making new ones and I will probably replace the blocks and rope with some from Syren.IMG_4368.thumb.JPG.24709adbee65b7a6cef71ff71a154852.JPG

The sails leave a lot to be desired and they don't match up in size with the plans. I might have to learn how to sew....

 

IMG_7773.thumb.JPG.8a1c726fc0d40186d62aadd389840863.JPG

There are two, large, double sided sets of plans and they appear to be 1:1 but that is not indicated on the plans. The sails certainly do not match up with the plans either; they're too small.

IMG_9824.thumb.JPG.b140fc7e8d320443535c4c72ddd42422.JPGIMG_0573.thumb.JPG.d15865e1cff867b91e1319fb78474050.JPGIMG_3866.thumb.JPG.a62991a206eb6a8a7e60a88baec83fbf.JPG

The instructions are in several languages including English but they are very brief. The instructional photos are a bit more help but I'll still be flying by the seat of my pants trying to figure things out.

IMG_8476.thumb.JPG.169be0cc95bdbd5d78caba1d7e35e5ab.JPG

I want to try and do the deck planking with joggles as shown below. The kit simply has a straight piece of mahogany laid down the middle of the boat from the stem to the stern. The build by hof00 here on MSW was done this way and he explains how he did it. I think it will be tough to get all those joggles laid out and cut correctly and to be able to plank the deck so it's symmetrical on both sides. This will be a long shot for me but I'll give it a go and see how big of a mess I can make....

IMG_9423.thumb.JPG.a17e8d4889ac91c4849cbf45a0419f47.JPG

I picked up this used book on eBay hoping that it would have some nice photos in it but it's more about the various versions of the Pen Duick and their racing history. It is a very good read though.

IMG_9838.thumb.JPG.4a1dbeb97aa8e8b41eb09311e67ae92b.JPG

I have the feeling, for whatever reason, that this build may turn into a rather directionless adventure for me. I hope some of you will take an interest in following along and, perhaps, steer me in the right direction when you see me veering off into the abyss.

 

So here we go...

Looking forward to your new build.  You did such an excellent job on the Long boat.  Happy building.   Bob

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Thanks, Justin, I'm sure I'll be treading water and trying not to sink on this one!

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It's time to update my build log. I have been able to get the build started and, after spending quite a bit of time studying the plans and trying to get as much as I could from the very brief instructions, it has been going fairly well. Harry, who goes by hof00 on this forum, has been extremely helpful in answering my questions and sending me photos of his beautiful build of the Pen Duick. You can read his log and our current conversation here:

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I carefully filed the slots on the bulkheads and the keel former until I was able to get the bulkheads to seat completely down in the slots while dry fitting them. Only bulkheads #9 and #10 needed to be squared up and clamped for gluing. All the others were a very tight, square fit. I used thin viscosity CA so it would seep into the seams of the bulkheads since they were such a tight fit.  

IMG_6072.thumb.JPG.d806f2a6a8453d12f93bbf8532ca0207.JPG

IMG_1205.thumb.JPG.986548fcd83657e604fd44b2b1e690eb.JPG

I then dry fit the deck onto the top of the bulkheads and keel former so I could insert the horizontal fantail piece #13 into the two slots on bulkhead #12 at the correct angle. Then I tacked it in place against bulkhead #12 with a spot of medium CA. That held it at the correct angle and then, after removing the deck, I used thin CA so it would run down into the seams as I held it firmly in place. That worked really well and made a strong bond on this rather fragile area.

 

IMG_4762.thumb.JPG.e2503a577f424ff3cc24a05440440e44.JPG

IMG_4323.thumb.JPG.f1b76172824c1b26fab082aa0305d40e.JPG

Next up was to glue in all the keel stiffeners between the bulkheads. Take care to study the plans and notice that the not all of the stiffeners are flush with the bottom of the keel. Only the first two stiffeners at the bow and the stern are flush with the bottom. All of the other stiffeners have a 1 mm space between them and the bottom of the keel or sit at odd angles. Guess why I know that...?!! Luckily, I only had to remove 3 of them with isopropyl alcohol and then glue them back in place correctly with CA. Note to self: Make sure to study the plans more thoroughly before proceeding! I also glued the subdeck floors in place

78813128_IMG_10162.thumb.JPG.f28d400fd6df97e7d28b002642583d95.JPGIMG_8658.thumb.JPG.103157c00df4badd361b72734ab5202f.JPG

I dry fit the deck and it was a good fit so I used white glue attach it and held it in place with rubber bands. The deck plate is very flexible so it was easy to form it to the shear of the boat and, after letting it set for a few hours, I removed the rubber bands and it formed a very solid structure for the fairing and planking to come.

IMG_3897.thumb.JPG.21bb9d44ffab9fee80fe83347df83128.JPGIMG_5350.thumb.JPG.4fc0b5c8e417ee5e80c66f71d50e082f.JPGIMG_2581.thumb.JPG.cb5c00017b20b4a13fcd80e0e4f63104.JPG 

The keel area is quite thick with the stiffeners in place so it looks like there will be quite a bit of sanding to get a fair run for planking yet to come. Since this is a sailboat that was made for open ocean racing it will have a rather V shaped hull that narrows sharply at the bottom. I've just started that process and will make another post when I've completed a bit more.

 

Thanks for taking the time to take a look at my build log.

 

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Nice "Skeleton!!" 

 

I think maybe sand the Doublers/Stiffeners with a narrow sanding block, Cross Grain, between the Bulkheads first so the Bulkheads don't get "Notched."

(I used fairly Corse abrasive paper for this to start with. You'll decide what works for you.)

Also, maybe run some Masking Tape along the edge of the False Deck when you "Fair" the Bulkheads, this should ensure that the False Deck Symmetry is retained, really important for the Deck Planking. 🙂

 

Anyway, not teaching you to "Suck Eggs."

 

A nice start Sir, take your time and know when to "Walk away."

 

Cheers....HOF.

 

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I finished fairing the hull today. I'm always unsure of this process though and I hope I did a good enough job on it. I probably spent a 7-8 hours in the past two days sanding and checking and sanding and checking. I went slowly using 120 grit sandpaper on the Soft-Sander blocks that I recently purchased. I used a plank to lay across the bulkheads regularly to check for high and low points as I was sanding and I sighted down the hull from different angles to try and see if the hull shape looked symmetrical.

 

It looks fair to me when I sight down the keel and it feels fair and symmetrical to my hand but I'm still not sure if I may have overdone it or it may still need a little more sanding. We'll see how it goes once I start planking.

 

IMG_0071.thumb.JPG.3bc9a9e17be4f7231cdd9a1f9efcf58e.JPGIMG_8260.thumb.JPG.b985568f6a0774bdd7cd80fcb253969b.JPGIMG_8841.thumb.JPG.c12d76061d089c1654faf7710c4afc67.JPG 

 

I really like the Soft-Sander blocks. They are very light and comfortable to hold for long periods of sanding and they conform nicely to curves and various shapes. They are stiff enough to sand precisely but have some give to them so the edge will not gouge. They use adhesive-backed sandpaper and it was easy to put it on the blocks and peel it off. I bought the 5" length block set that has 6 different shapes and comes with 6 pieces of adhesive-backed sandpaper in grits from 80 to 2000. They also come in 8 and 11 inch block sets. I only used 120 grit for the fairing with the yellow and purple blocks. 

 

I got this set on Amazon:  https://www.amazon.com/Style-Line-STY0701-Piece-Sanders/dp/B002XMOX3I/ref=sr_1_6?crid=1M0E8L0AXZT8T&dchild=1&keywords=soft-sanders+flexible+sanding+blocks&qid=1589766325&sprefix=soft-sander%2Caps%2C210&sr=8-6

 

I like them so much that I ordered some more adhesive-backed sandpaper in various grits from the manufacturer's website. They also sell the sandpaper in rolls.  https://www.shop.softsanders.com/main.sc 

 

I used the yellow block the most and the purple blocks worked well for the more pronounced curved areas. You can see the sandpaper attached to the purple sander below:

 

IMG_6103.thumb.JPG.e1956320c242267710cf5a1a3231758c.JPG

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5 minutes ago, BobG said:

I'm always unsure of this process

Me too.   I almost always feel like I really don't know what result Im going to get.   I am only just starting to realize that when I think I'm done, Im probably only half way!

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I hear you, Justin. It's such an important step in laying the foundation for the planks and to get a correct hull shape. I think this is one of those modeling skills that simply comes with more and more practice. 

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Hi Chap,

Looking pretty damn good!! (Much better than this "Go For It Guy."

(Brings back some fond memories....)

 

So, I guess you'll be planking the Deck soonish?

 

I used a Mahogany strip for the Waterway/Margin Plank.

If guess if you don't have the mahogany Strip timber at hand you could always stain?

You should easily be able to "Edge Form" the Deck Planking as the curve is not too severe. (I used Aliphatic Resin/PVA for Decking, gives time to adjust things and simply wipe off any excess.)

 

Ensure that the Margin Plank goes all the way from Bow to Stern, Not right around the Stern, of course.(You can trim the Stern Margin later with a Razor Saw.

I held the Deck Planking in place with Micromark Screw Planking Clamps, (Screws inboard of course.)

(You might have a different method but ensure the Margin Plank is symmetrical and in-line with the False Deck edges, symmetry is everything with the Deck Planking.)

 

You don't need to worry about Joggling at this stage, as you know.

 

Ensure you draw a Centre line down the False Deck before you do the above also.... (-:

That will also give you the Mitre for the Margin Plank at the Bow.

 

There I go again, teaching you to suck eggs.... (-:

 

Cheers....HOF.

 

 

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On 5/17/2020 at 10:58 PM, hof00 said:

So, I guess you'll be planking the Deck soonish?

It will be a few days before I actually start planking the deck. I just ordered some 1x3 mm mahogany strips so I can have a mahogany margin plank to start with too.

 

In the meantime, I hope I can get a good, card template of the deck made with the joggling before I start laying down any deck planks. I'd rather erase pencil lines than rip off planks! I'm going to play with it a bit and see what kind of layout I can come up with.

 

I've also been looking at as many photos of the Pen Duick 1 that I can find on the internet. I can tell now that, although the AL kit can certainly make a very nice model, it's not completely historically correct. For one, the AL model only has about 1/2 the total number of deck planks that the real sailboat has on it. I thought about using 1.5 mm wide planks which would effectively double the number planks on the model but then I think the joggling would become a nightmare. I'll stick with the 3 mm wide planks. 

 

You can see how there are many more deck planks on the Pen Duick I than the kit has:

T864MP.jpg.b8056589f6af95f5ba68d16f9a2ad198.jpg

 

The sequence of some of the build steps puzzled me at first. Typically, one would think that after the false deck is glued on and the bulkheads have been faired, you would then attach the bulwarks and plank the hull before planking the deck. I'm not sure why the AL instructions have you plank the deck before adding the bulwarks and the hull planking. I think I will follow the AL sequence, however, since it seemed to work the two build logs here on MSW that I have read.

 

I guess I could begin assembling some of the deck structures while I'm waiting on the mahogany strips to arrive but, for now, I'm going to go and make some rustic bread... 🥖

 

 

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21 hours ago, BobG said:

I used the yellow block the most and the purple blocks worked well for the more pronounced curved areas

I have the same set as well (I usually used the green piece though). I thought it really useful for sanding my hull. 
 

I’m looking forward to watching the rest of your build!

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Hi Bob,

You're popping up all over the place!! 😁

Saw your enquiry on "Cabbie's" Mermaid.

 

I had the problem you described above.... I resorted to my "Mini " Proxon saw to cut Cross-grain after experiencing the same problem that you are encountering..

You could support the Mahogany strip on thin scrap, wood and use a Razor Saw to go cross grain? (You would need some sort of template to decide on cross Grain cuts and longitudinal cuts.)

 

(Sorry, I didn't do a template for my build, just had a thought that this might make things easier.)

 

I didn't try it, but maybe if the King Plank is affixed first, there'd be less risk of breaking it. 

Again, have a go on a small piece first, see if the integrity of the wood is better stuck down. (The only downside to this is that if in error, you'll have to try and remove the King Plank.)

 

If it helps, I marked the King Plank 2.0mm from either long edge to give me the cross grain depth of cut for each "Joggle."

Mark the vertical once you know the length of joggled ends. (From memory, the long ends of each joggle were approx. 80')

 

Another thing is that the Mahogany around the hatch openings will assist in determining the position of the King Plank.

(Once again, you will have cross grain mitre cuts....)

 

Planning I guess.

 

Cheers.... HOF.

 

Get your Waterway/Margin plank on first, it should flow from there.

 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, hof00 said:

Hi Bob,

You're popping up all over the place!! 😁

Saw your enquiry on "Cabbie's" Mermaid.

 

I had the problem you described above.... I resorted to my "Mini " Proxon saw to cut Cross-grain after experiencing the same problem that you are encountering..

You could support the Mahogany strip on thin scrap, wood and use a Razor Saw to go cross grain? (You would need some sort of template to decide on cross Grain cuts and longitudinal cuts.)

Hello Harry,

 

I searched the forum for ideas about how to go about cutting the joggles in the deck planks and came across your post on Cabbie's Mermaid build log. I think the way that Cabbie describes how he did it may work for the king plank on the Pen Duick. The mahogany king plank is so thin and brittle that it needs some backing in order to get a clean cross cut otherwise it tears and breaks easily. I try a test piece glued down and see if I can cut the joggle and then be able to remove the wood cleanly the way Cabbie describes.

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Hi Chap,

Another idea that comes to mind..... 

Have an "Experiment" with placing Masking Tape, or similar, on  a small piece of Plank? (Then you have the problem of removing the tape after you've made the cuts....)

(In my kit, there was quite a bit of extra Mahogany for the King Plank, I guess just for this purpose, maybe?)

 

Yup, the Mahogany is extremely fragile.... (The Deck furniture, (Skylights, etc.) wood also....)

 

Razor/Proxon Saw? A scalpel, Cross Cut tends to "Crush" the wood, as I'm sure you have experienced.

 

Another Idea, how about a Bit of Sanding Sealer both sides of the Plank? Have a try on a small piece.

 

The above are just ideas, Sanding Sealer can improve the integrity of the wood structure once dry and will not impair the look of the wood once the whole Deck is sanded as a complete unit.

 

Anyway, trying to be practical/pragmatic.

 

Maybe others on this forum can also offer some sage advice?

 

Cheers....HOF.

 

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Hello Bob

 I have been watching your build so far and keen to see more.

Looks very good, don't worry about the pace of the build, just do it as it comes.

It will be a big help having Hof on board as the "Chairman of the advisory board"

very talented builder.

When cutting out for the joggling, nibble at it don't try to do the full cutout in one go.

I start small with little cuts across the grain which helps to stop big split outs along the grain.

Do a series of little cuts along the length of the cutout and tease out little pieces of the plank until you are ready to

do the final neat cut. I cut the curve of the margin planks the same way before gluing, with sharp flat blades and then sanded to the final curve needed.

I have a whole pile of the cheap finger nail sanding strips available in different sizes and grits and find them very handy

to hold and use on most parts before gluing in place.

Hooroo Chris

 

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