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High torque, really low speed drill


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The tool I have that I dislike the most to use is my dremel for drilling. When drilling I like to go very slowly taking my time. And that high pitched noise of the dremel wants you to do it fast and hastily. 

 

I like pin vises a lot. But the pains in my hands don't like them.

 

Is there any high torque drill in the size of a dremel with low rpm? I'm not talking low rpms in the 10 000s lika a proxxon but perhaps closer to a 1 000? And with a trigger or footpedal that isn't a simple on and off switch. And that is quiet.

 

Like a normal cordless drill but smaller.

 

I've read about Foredoms. I like many things about them, but they also have their high rpms as a major selling point.

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Hi - I’ve got the foredom drill and although they are expensive it’s probably what you are looking for. It has a foot control so you can go as slow as you like. It also has loads of torque and I cannot compare it to my old dremel. 
 

Mark

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5 hours ago, silverman834 said:

I like many things about them, but they also have their high rpms as a major selling point.

50,000rpm is for metal. Many operations works better at that speed instead of a lower speed

1000 rpm is the lower speed

2 ways to adjust the speed: roughly by the pedal or precisely by a control knob

5 hours ago, silverman834 said:

Is there any high torque drill

this one has  a lot of torque , it extremely quiet and it is brushless

IMG_6061.jpg

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Regarding the Foredom drills I had only seen the SR version that goes up to 18 000 rpm. Sure, I can throttle it back, but than I don't nearly get the torque that the higher rpms get. But now I saw their LX that goes only up to 5 000! That looks like what I'm looking for! Now I just need to find a shop with it in the EU.

 

1 hour ago, Roger Pellett said:

If you like pin vices, how about an Archimedes Drill?  

Yes, I really like the idea of them, except that they are two handed.

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Cooks on gold sell them in the UK that’s where I got mine from. I’m unsure though why you think RPM has anything to do with torque?  The motors that Foredom supply are very powerful and I’ve never been able to stall mine. Even at really low speed the power is there and I think mine is an SR.

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The relationship between speed and torque is a function of the motor design. Inexpensive motors can make up for their inherent lack of heavier (and more costly) construction by using speed to make up for a lack of torque. Hence, when their speed is reduced, so is their torque, often to the point where at lower speeds they stall out. A heavy-duty electric motor can be built to maintain torque at low speeds, but the construction costs more. These will generally be tools like the Foredom flex-shaft and belt-driven dental engines.

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Power, measured in horsepower or watts, is the rate at which work is performed.  In a piece of rotating machinery, power is torque x RPM or ft-lbs/min.  Bob is exactly right, a manufacturer wanting to promote his product by advertising that it “has a powerful 25 watt motor” can do so inexpensively by using a high RPM low torque motor.  There are also possibly some advantages to the customer too.  The tool can be much lighter.  The Dremel type tools were originally sold for light duty polishing, wire brushing, and grinding; all applications where high speed is desirable.  Trying to use them for low speed high torque applications is something for which they are ill suited.

 

Roger

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My electrical engineering knowledge is almost 60 years old, and so is the technology in at least some of the Dremel type tools.  There have been some tremendous improvements in electric motors lately, that I don’t pretend to understand.  Electric propulsion of ships was tried and largely abandoned in the 1920’s and 1930’s.  Now with improved electric motor technology it is making a comeback.  Maybe this improved technology will or has resulted in improved miniature rotating tools.

 

Roger

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Also rather than a pin vice for drilling small holes you might want to consider one of these.

 

242972514_Screenshot2022-06-23at21_45_29.thumb.png.c55d82df0d440beca9906e5462293868.png

 

My son bought me the kit as a stocking filler - to some extent as a joke, but surprisingly i find myself using it to drill awkwardly positioned holes where I would normally revert to a pin vice. The speed is very low - probably 400 rpm and the collets only go up to 3mm (.118")  so it is a bit limited.

 

A review:- https://doogsmodels.com/2012/07/24/gear-review-tamiya-electric-handy-drill/

 

 

Edited by KeithAug
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This micro drill just came on the market a couple of weeks ago: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0B3HYVPR4

 

To me it looks ideal for ship modelling type applications so I ordered one. When I ordered it it was only $35 with the coupon - but I guess that was an initial promo price as now it is $47 with coupon. It ships from China so mine should arrive in a week or so.

 

There's also pro, drill press and screwdriver versions of it: https://www.amazon.com/s?k=ARROWMAX&crid=121NPJHTL5150&sprefix=arrowmax

 

I found more info on it here https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/sds-pro-smart-motion-control-mini-electric-drill--2#/

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