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flying_dutchman2

Eight Sided Drainage Mill scale 1:15 (Achtkante Poldermolen)

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Marcus,

I used some plastic sheets for model railroads. Probably too small for what you're doing.    What size would the bricks have to be?  Maybe something from a toy shop like the old building bricks they used to sell.  Not Legos but I don't remember the name.

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Posted (edited)

I googled 'how to make scale bricks' and came upon this site. 

http://theminiaturespage.com/workbench/682648

It shows you a simple method of creating bricks with available materials that you can buy from home depot and other do it yourself stores. Around $25.20.

Researched it some more, and this is what I am going to do 

Purchasing model bricks online is a costly undertaking. With the above materials I can make about 1000. Which is what I will need. 

 

Question for the Dutch members. 

I went to this site and what is the best type I need and then convert to the scale of 1:15 (metric). 

https//nl.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lijst_van_baksteenformaten

 

My problem with building anything, is the scale. 

Marcus 

Edited by flying_dutchman2
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Posted (edited)

Marcus,

 

I'm living in a 1920 build house, lots of mills even predate this one, the stone's facia is height 2" (5cm) width 8 3/8" (21cm) those are not present day standard sizes. When I look at the list that coincides. So It just depends on where you place you mill geographically ...

Edited by cog

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After spending some time on the internet looking at pictures of windmills I have decided what I am going to do. 

The majority of mills have a white foundation wall. This is painted. The walls where the doors and windows are have horizontal wooden slats, painted green. 

 

I still want to purchase the materials for bricks because I have created a template with 72 rectangles, 20mm x 10mm x 6mm

Marcus 

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Made a template for the horizontal slats. Cut two pieces of wood in a step form. Steps are 8mm wide and 2mm high. Slats will overlap 2mm.

 

Cut 4" x 24" x 1/8" pieces of basswood into strips 1cm wide by 24" long and then cut each strip into 3 equal lengths.

 

First panel of slats is finished. 

 

Attempted to make a template for the bricks from acrylic. Drew in all the rectangles on it. Drilled a hole in each rectangle. Used the scroll saw to cut the first rectangle.. The piece did not come out of the template as the heat of the blade melted the acrylic. Even tried the slowest speed. Should have known this. 

 

Redid the template for the bricks from hardwood. 

Marcus IMG_20180612_113742.thumb.jpg.9a9fe12155c305a843e5c4a0024dd41e.jpg

Achtkantige pdrmln, temp. for slats 2.jpg

Achtkantige pdrmln, temp. for slats 3.jpg

Achtkantige pdrmln, panel of slats .jpg

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A lot of thought you are putting into this project Marcus and sifting through all the helpful hints. So far your plan makes a lot of sense.  I'm sure that your windmill will come very close to the real thing, in miniature.  I hope I can do as well with my planned wipwatermolen.

 

Cheers,

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@ Piet, thank you for the wonderful and encouraging complement. 

 

@ The rest. Thanks for all the likes  

 

Building the mill has been a whole different ballgame. It is a challenge at every step. 

Marcus 

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Posted (edited)

Piet and Cog Check this out. 

http://www.notechmagazine.com/2009/10/scale-models-of-traditional-dutch-windmills.html

The rest of this site has pictures and other links. 

 

https://archive.org/details/windmillsandwin00powegoog

 

https://archive.org/details/TheoretischEnPractischMolenboek

 

Marcus 

Edited by flying_dutchman2
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I have the original for the six and eight sided windmills including the drawings, costed me a few Euros but worth it's while.

 

Some mill related news

Last week on the Dutch telly the Earl of Dikes (lit. trans., i.e. the person responsible for the maintenance and level of water & water related systems in a province) in the province of Noord-Holland (North Holland) got offered the use of the remaining wind driven watermills to move the water when the modern pumping stations cannot handle all the surplus due to the current climate changes. We have more water to disperse annually, both from an increase in rain, as from the increased river levels from abroad - most likely due to the same. FYI. This year we had some "minor" flooding (compared to elsewhere) as the quantity of water to disperse in a limited time increased drastically. To avoid flooding, water is pumped to special reserved places which are meant to be flooded, like what we call "Uiterwaarden" the land between the river and the dike, sometimes there are two dikes, which implies the water will be stored in between. These last decades government has appointed certain regions to be made available for flooding. However, you still need the system to be able to cope with the quantity "offered", hence the windmills

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9 hours ago, cog said:

I have the original for the six and eight sided windmills including the drawings, costed me a few Euros but worth it's while.

From the notech magazine? If so, I would like to get this as well. If it is not that link, which one and is there contact information?

Marcus 

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No, I bought the book through a Dutch ebay type a site ...

 

I mean this one: “Theoretisch en practisch molenboek: voor ingenieurs, aannemers, molenaars en andere bouwkundigen“, G. Krook, 1850.

click the link, select the full screen button (the four arrows pointing to corners) and then you geet a button with PDF/ePub download

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Finished 8 horizontal slat panels. 

The structure has been moved from the basement back to the garage as I need to sand with the belt sander the areas where the panels will be installed and the foundation walls where I will install the bricks. 

 

I have been reading the instructions for building the vanes and there are some parts that I don't understand. Will ask about it when I get to it. This is for cog, as he has the instructions as well. 

Marcus 

Achtkantige pdrmln, horiz. slat panels .jpg

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15 minutes ago, flying_dutchman2 said:

This is for cog, as he has the instructions as well. 

So I'll be prepared ... I presume ...

 

You are ready for a clinker built boat Marcus, looks very good, dark green ...

Edited by cog
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Thanks Marcus for the links, I have downloaded them and will study the mills at my pleasure when I have the time.

Your "klinker" build wall panels came out really nice. Leave it up to Carl to come up with an astute idea, very clever. :)  Would that be lapstrake in English by chance? The longer I don't speak or read Dutch the more I have trouble remembering words :(  Sad, but true.

 

Cheers,

 

 

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14 hours ago, Piet said:

The longer I don't speak or read Dutch the more I have trouble remembering words :(  Sad, but true.

Cheers

I had that problem as well, so I got a subscription on the NRC (very good Dutch newspaper) and my best friends wife has a subscription on Quest (Dutch monthly like Discovery). When she is finished reading a few she mails them to me. In return I mail them my monthlies which are Wierd, Pacific Standard and the Atlantic. 

Marcus 

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15 hours ago, Piet said:

Would that be lapstrake in English by chance?

In American homes it is referred to as "clapboard" siding, Piet.  Judging from Marcus' photos, I would say it is clapboard.  On boats I think it is lapstrake as you say.

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Today was dry and used a cutting wheel with the Dremel to make ridges and cuts in the paste to make it look like thatch. 

Used the sander to even out the foundation wall and the walls where the clinker slats will be installed. Pictures will follow 

Marcus 

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