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Viking by HOJOFAN - Artesania Latina - 10th Century Replica Gokstad


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HELLO!  I am an extreme newbie...meaning I have NO woodworking, modeling, or knowledge of ships.  I just LOVE them so here I am - learning about them and starting something new.

 

After doing some research I decided on this little gem as it seemed a good way to start.  The kit came pretty quickly after I ordered it and looking at the parts and instructions and all the tiny little pieces of this great piece lets just say this.  It's going to be FUN!!

 

When I searched the Build logs - there isn't one of these Vikings by AL anywhere....but lots of other AL ships.  Me first?  Gulp...

 

So what's a girl to do?  Open the box - take a few pics - and start here.  I purchased a few basic things like clamps and glue and other bits and pieces - didn't go crazy.  And collected some things from around the house. Started reviewing the beginners pages - but didn't want to overload myself with info - seems to be a bit hairy.

 

I am hoping that I will get some great tips along the way - learn a lot - and have a fantastic piece to start a collection.

 

What is your FAVOURITE beginners tip?  Please share it with me - would love to hear what your suggestions are.

 

THANK YOU!!

 

:dancetl6:

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Christine, First of all Hello and welcome to the site. Start by reading over the instructions good and dive right in. if you run into anything that does not make sense to you just get on here and ask your question. There are a very awesome group of modelers that can offer you very good advice and many ways to solve some building problems. The best part of learning, is doing, and making a few mistakes along the way. We all have made our fair share of them but you will find that most all can be fixed and it is its own learning experience.

   

     Happy modeling ,

         Marty G.

 

   P.S. Great model by the way, Looking forward to see the transformation from planks and string to a model you will be proud of.  

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Welcome aboard!

 

I still consider myself a newbie, since I just started last August.  I think the biggest help to me was spending as much time reading all the build logs on this forum, as I spent building!  Even if the kit isn't the same as you are working on, many of the techniques and tips used by others will apply to your build as well, even if it's not the same ship.

 

For this kit, search the logs for other viking type ships, I know there have been a few of them on here during the last 6-8 months that I've enjoyed following.

 

Second tip - don't be afraid to disassemble stuff and re-do it.  As I've seen repeated here often, "it's just wood", and almost anything can be torn apart and redone if you are patient and willing.

Most important - have fun!  

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Welcome aboard! I agree with Brian that having fun is the most important thing. As far as tips, the wood glue in the background of your picture is a great choice. Should you ever use super glue (CA glues) though, make sure you also get the de-bonder and keep it within easy reach. That stuff glues skin together better than wood! I met a guy who had spilt some and glued his forearm to his bench!

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Hey Christine good luck with your endeavor it is my first build also dummy me jumped into a very hard model to build and the instructions are written in a very odd style of interpreted English the pictures are black and white thank goodness I'm not color blind lol im enjoying my build so I do hope you find yours to be very enjoyable

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Hi, Chistine. There are quite a few Viking ship models on the build logs - the one most people have made is called the Oseberg ship. If you search that one up and have a look at few of those build logs you might find them of help.

 

The most important thing is to have fun.

 

Steven

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WOW - I'm honoured to have such great encouragement and appreciate all the kind words.  Please trust me when I say - I'm soaking it all in and ready willing and able to jump in.  Thank you to Marty, John, Brian, Buck, Fam, Steven and Don!

 

I'm getting ready to cut my first piece and looking at some of the building logs some builders wax or stain before they assemble it?  Or for my first attempt - jump in and just do it - stain it later?

 

Cheers!

 

:dancetl6:

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Cristine

stain will not be taken if the wood fibers have absorbed some glue... well it also depends by the type of glue, but this is a general rule: so it's very important that you wipe off any trace of glue before it sets, while assembling.

Sanding takes care of this, but not completely: again, much depends by the type of wood (how much 'open' are its fibers) and type of glue. Sanding also removes some, if not most, of the stain so you will have to re-touch and refine it if you are going to pre-stain the parts.

These are more or less the pros and cons about what you asked.

From your pictures it seems to me that the planking is not klinker, so it will be easier for you to sand the hull properly smooth and fair: my suggestion (what I would do in this case) is to assemble, taking lot of care of any excess glue, then sand smooth, then stain. I also suggest white glue (or PVA or carpenter glue or Vinavil, as it is sometimes called, depends by Country), it is easier to manage even if takes a bit more to set

Hope this helps

ciao

Fam

Edited by Fam
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Thank you Fam - will do!  I managed to get the keel and frames cut out yesterday and in place together but haven't glued anything as of yet.  I have some wood glue and tacky white glue to do the job. Therefore I will experiment with some scraps first then decide which I like best.  I'll save the staining for later.

 

Thanks a bunch!

 

:dancetl6:

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I ran into a bit of a snag today - I got the outer keel and frames in place for step 1.   :D   Was really happy about how well it went together and easy to follow and all glued in place.

 

I went to attach the deck to fit the frame but as you can imagine - it's not a flat ship and of course a slight pressure and it doesn't stay in place.  So I've managed to get a small crack at one of the spots where it fits with the frame.  What is the best way to get this to bend and stay while I try to glue it??  Without breaking it??   :huh:

 

Cheers!!

:dancetl6:

 

 

 

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Welcome aboard, Christine.  You've picked a fine project for your maiden voyage into wooden ship building.

 

You will come across many instances where you will need to bend wood in order to get it to sit properly and take a new shape...particularly during planking.  The most common solution is to soak the wood until it is pliable and then clamp or weight it down until it dries.  Once it has set it is easy to glue it into place.  Most of us simply use water and have a pan handy.  If you search the forum you'll find many suggestions on bending planks (including heat and the use of the microwave).  A lot depends on the particular piece and it's dimensions.  Sometimes just spraying it will be sufficient, at other times a good soaking is required.

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Welcome aboard, Christine.  You've picked a fine project for your maiden voyage into wooden ship building.

 

You will come across many instances where you will need to bend wood in order to get it to sit properly and take a new shape...particularly during planking.  The most common solution is to soak the wood until it is pliable and then clamp or weight it down until it dries.  Once it has set it is easy to glue it into place.  Most of us simply use water and have a pan handy.  If you search the forum you'll find many suggestions on bending planks (including heat and the use of the microwave).  A lot depends on the particular piece and it's dimensions.  Sometimes just spraying it will be sufficient, at other times a good soaking is required.

 

 

THANK YOU!  I was reading on the soaking and planking - but was leery of soaking the deck.  (not sure why -  :huh: )

 

I'll try soaking it and weighing it down.  The deck is only 1.5mm thin and 26.7cm long.

 

You're awesome ~ thanks for the quick response!  

 

:dancetl6:

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  • 4 weeks later...

My little longboat is coming along - the deck is in and the supports are on too!  Soaking was easy and seemed to do a great job with putting the pieces where they needed to be!! 

 

I am STUCK!  I read through some of the documents and guides - but no closer to getting further.  I'm trying to get the hull together.  I have my pieces soaking in water to bend them - but after reading and re-reading I'm not sure where to go.  I am supposed to nail these strake plates to the frames.  Is there a trick?  AND - I'm trying to figure out a way to support the frame during the hammering process.  Ideas?

 

Cheers!

 

:dancetl6:

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi Christine, to bend your planks, use a steam iron after soaking them. Turn your iron on to maximum, then place your soaked planks under the iron for a few seconds. Then, move you iron away whilst using the edge of the iron to bend the planks. 

 

Most people would recommend that you NOT nail the planks to the frame. Rather, you should glue the planks using PVA (white) glue and clamp it until the glue is cured. You can make a simple clamp out of paper clips, like this: 

 

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Edited by KeithW
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Hi Christine, to bend your planks, use a steam iron after soaking them. Turn your iron on to maximum, then place your soaked planks under the iron for a few seconds. Then, move you iron away whilst using the edge of the iron to bend the planks. 

 

Most people would recommend that you NOT nail the planks to the frame. Rather, you should glue the planks using PVA (white) glue and clamp it until the glue is cured. You can make a simple clamp out of paper clips, like this: 

 

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This is awesome!  And THANK YOU for the pic!  That helped immensely!!  I have lots of clips and clamps to work with but couldn't figure out how to place them to hold!

 

Fantastic!!

 

:dancetl6:

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Hi Christine,

 

I just came across your log. Firstly, another warm welcome to MSW. You've already found the most important tool in your toolbox - this build log. I see that you've already had a couple of problems and received some great advice. Isn't this forum awesome?! I haven't built this particular ship, but I'll follow along from here too and offer any advice I can as you go. Its great to see you enjoying this wonderful hobby from the outset, and receiving so much help and support. :)

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Christine, couple of points..... there is such a thing as a "nail tool" I have never used one but I have heard that work quite well. As for my experience I use a pair of pointed pliers to hold the nail while I tap in using a very small  hammer I got from a rather cheap tool kit which had screwdrivers and such that you really could only use once as they bent at the end..... great little hammer though. Holding the model can be tricky...  I have tried holding it in my lap for the smaller models, works sometimes, however the most stable way is to purchase a "hull planking vise" or build your own planking vise by assembling wood and clamping the model to it right side up and then turning it over and clamping the hull upside down to complete the bottom planking. Bit awkward to explain but I hope you get the idea. Always make sure the model is supported properly especially when you turn it over.    Hope this helps...... you can contact me if you need any more clarification.  I will attach a couple of pics to see if they help   .....  JM

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Hi, Christine.  To each his (or her) own, and I'm sure some people have good results with nails.  I never have; the planks split; the nails won't go in; etc.  There are commercially available planking vises, or, as JM suggests, you could make your own.  After you have soaked the planks and bent them with an iron, a commercially available plank bender (sort of like a soldering iron with a round attachment on the end,  a tool that crimps the back side (that I have found works pretty well), or something else; after the planks are bent, gluing and clamping should do the job.  Good luck.

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