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Lanyard Question


husky1943
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Okay, here goes -

 

I apologize in advance for probably using the wrong nomenclature.  I don't know enough to call everything by it's actual name.

 

Question:  I was looking at the ratlines, and I noticed that a lot of ya'll use rope-colored (lighter-colored) rope on the deadeyes / blocks at the bottom of the shrouds.  I thought that standing rigging was usually black because it had been tarred to protect it from the elements.  Wouldn't the rope in the deadeyes / blocks be black?  Does it depend on the era? 

 

Just curious, and thanks for the education.

 

Rob

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Some folks do the lanyard, the line that is used to tighten the two deadeyes to each other, in lighter, non-tarred line as it is not fixed in place but is adjustable hence 'running' rigging.  I personally think it should be 'dirty' at the least from the tar used on the shrouds getting onto the lanyards, and to keep them from looking quite so starkly white.

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Hey Derek,

 

Sorry about that...what I meant is to use a "loom" to make the ratlines.  Someone gave me a Heller model one time, and although it had more lost parts than parts present in the box, the one thing that I did see was a loom, or pattern, that could be used to make the ratlines off the model, and then they would be installed after being pretty much pre-fabricated.  I wanted to do my next model with actual ratlines, and I was thinking about trying to build them off the model and then trying to install them afterwards.  I hope that makes sense...

 

Ciao for now, Rob

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There is the Loom-a-Line tool.. which is considered a waste of money.  The biggest problem with looming is getting everything in the right place including deadeyes, etc. I did a Heller Vic with their loom. Ended up tossing it as it was more trouble than it was worth and doing the shrouds and rats on ship.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 2/9/2017 at 7:34 AM, husky1943 said:

Wow, I thought of another question; do the ratlines actually support the masts or are they simply for access aloft?

 

 

Rob, I think this might be a case where the wrong nomenclature is being used as you mentioned above. The (almost) vertical ropes running from the masthead to the deadeyes are the shrouds, and yes, they are used to support the masts. However the shrouds also form the sides of the "rope ladders" for access aloft. The ratlines are the thinner ropes used as the "rungs" . 

Edited by Louie da fly
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Further clarification, the smaller diameter line that passes back and forth between the deadeyes  is known as the Lanyard and I believe it's the line the original question was about. Lanyards are not tarred on pourpose but the shrouds above them are tarred repeatedly over their lifespan. Due to the nature of tar, it can, on a hot day, return to a liquid state and it can flow like syrup. As a result the lanyards WILL become quite tarry over time as the tar from the shrouds drips onto them. my advice is to use line that looks dirty or dark as opposed to bright white.

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Howdy all,

 

Many thanks for the information, and I think that I misspoke (misstyped?) when I wrote about looming.  I tried it once, but found it insanely frustrating to use (alignment issues, too tight versus too loose, reattaching it to the boat, etc).  I meant that I was going to do my own lines, vice using the plastic ones. 

 

Ciao for now

Rob

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Howdy Mark,

 

Thanks for the link to that idea.  However, I am certain that mine ARE NOT going to come out looking as perfect as many of these talented folk!  However, I soaking up the ideas, and any thought is a good thought.  As a I used to tell my children, "Even bad examples can be good examples....of what NOT to do."  Now, whether they listened, that's another issue...

 

Ciao for now

Rob

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