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I need to identify this fitting from a 26 ft sloop.  It's some sort of chock or fairlead.  The next question is does anybody make one of these fittings so I don't have to scratch a master and cast them?  Need some about 3/8" to 1/2" long.  I checked Bluejacket and Model Expo and some model yacht suppliers.  No go.

Any help would be appreciated - even if they were made by a defunct mfg as I inherited a load of old fittings from AJ Fisher, Baucher (sp), etc. - drawers full...if they made some I will search through the stuff I have.

Thanks,

Kurt

cleat - cockpit cap rail -small.jpg

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Thanks Jim.  I think the panama fairlead that AOS has is for a Panama Canal rated ship - it has a almost square profile while this chock is much lower profile.  I have thought that I will have to cut and modify a closed chock and make a mold to cast copies.  I have an inquiry in with the boats owner who's commissioned the model - I sketched and measured the fitting but I can't read my writing (unusual as I normally have very good lettering - but went cursive standing on a ladder in the boat shed). 

Thanks.

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Yep, it is a standard fitting on small sailing boats - the advantage over the closed type is that you can take the rope in and out without having to reeve it through a hole. Their are commonly used at both ends of a boat for mooring lines or also for anchor lines - in both cases you may not want to take the line of its belaying point when hauling in or paying out - in case it slips from your hands.

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Nic:

Yeah, I did too.  Looks like it's time to make a master and then cast them.  I thought about bending/twisting them like you did and adding a bit of low temp solder to the ends and filing to get a master but I think starting from scratch will work better.

Kurt

 

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The Panama Fairlead is not the fitting needed - wish it was.  It's almost square when viewed from the side and the part I need is very low profile from the side - full size they are only 5 1/2" long by about 1 1/2" to 2" high.  Two full sized Panama Fairlead's would sink the 26' sloop I am modeling.

I will be making up a master, then a mold and then cast, polish and plate the parts for the model.

 

Thanks to all who have commented and provided help.

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Kurt,

 

I have two of these straight fairleads.  They measure 12mm, made of white metal with an aged bronze plating or painting.   I believe they came with the Blue Jacket 1:30 Endeavour J boat, but they were packed with two pair of oar locks that were 6mm long.    

If it will help, I can send these to you to make a mold / copies

 

Also, check out this page at BlueJacket:   http://www.bluejacketinc.com/fittings/fittings17.htm 

 

Dee Dee

 

5a7134e02dfa8_FairleadsforK2G7A4234.thumb.jpg.9cd8b0f12909c59afd62d54267a3f051.jpg

Edited by Dee_Dee
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Dee Dee:

Thanks for the offer, but I have a bunch of these.  In fact I have just about decided to use them because after spending almost a full day machining 4 from brass I just am not happy that they look any better than this style.  I am just about convinced that the angle of the horns isn't going to be missed in the model.  I know that this isn't the first small sloop to be modeled and this style had to be used on those models as nobody sells anything much different.

Thanks again for the offer and thanks to all who have pitched in.

Kurt

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  • 6 months later...

yes - " bog standard" fitting on older  yachts -  used precisely as described - for "Warping".

If one is say end for ending along side it is handy just to be able to take out and "drop" the line into the fitting during the manouevre. 

(Though it is badly led - I think the "chafe" in the picture is actually the fuzzy end of a splice - i was just reading an article on that point - did one need to finish a splice neatly)

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For the sake of trivia: Panama Leads are fully enclosed fairleads found on large modern oceangoing ships. They are an oval ring the dockline passes through, closed at the top. When ships enter the Panama locks and the water level drops, the ships are now well below the level at which they entered. The  docklines that were once leading over the fairleads and DOWN to the edge of the locks now lead UP to the edge of the locks. The closed oval prevents the docklines from lifting up and out of position.

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