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I don’t know if this is heresy. Has anyone at MSW coppered a hull with paper? I was thinking  from a scale appearance, it might appear more subtle and be easier to control than real copper. I would think it would be much easier adhere to the hull. You could prepaint them in several slightly different shades  of “old penny”. Then you could dry brush highlights after they’re in place. I wouldn't simulate nails as they really wouldn’t be seen, and really make the area too busy IMHO. I’ll have to experiment. The plastic guys come up with some pretty amazing stuff, so why not us? Unless its important to the builder that its real copper. A lot of other parts on our ships are not made of the real thing.

 

Kurt

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I was thinking of some kind of archival paper that can be painted like the art suppliers carry. I think there would be less chance of them coming loose using PVA. Then seal them with wipe on poly or Pledge or Future Floor Wax like the armor guys do. Then you could also do washes like they do then. I honestly think they might outlast the rest of the model. They would outlast me for sure. 

 

Kurt

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Sounds promising, Kurt.   The only potential "gotcha's" I can see would be the thickness of the paper might be more than the copper and that applying paint might wrinkle it.  I look forward to your tests.   

 

Just a thought hit me... is there such a thing as copper colored wrapping paper for presents?   Then dry brush your patina instead of a wash.

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I intend to try using 100% rag bond paper - the dissertation stuff - with the Modern Masters copper products.

It has a primer - acid block and surface smoother (I hope) , a real copper coat  ,  and a patina  producer ,

antique copper , and copper penny.

I was thinking of turning the paper into copper while still a sheet and using a Guillotine Trimmer to cut it into scale pieces.

 

If I can ever get a hull that far along.

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This was put out there to see if it had been done. I had forgotten about Philip Reed.I have had next to no time actually modelling for the last several months, so experimenting won’t be anytime soon. I was thinking you could use paper meant for painting on. If you airbrushed the piece of paper before it is cut into plates I would doubt it would wrinkle. Once given a sealing coat after they are all in place, poly or acrylic wax like Pledge, you’re only dealing with the top coat for any additional painting. It would also help bond everything. As far as thickness goes I’d have to see what was available. Maybe even silkspan could be used. In the end the cost might be the same. The look might be better. Manipulating the individual plates in placement I think would be easier. Timewise, who knows, but the final look is the goal. It might look like garbage. I think someone like Paul Budzik, would attempt the whole process with paint alone, not even bother making the plates. Wouldn’t need to worry about thickness then.

 

Kurt

 

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I gather it is all a question of what do you try do: to give the ship a workday look, or to turn it into a piece of artisanal handicraft. In the latter case polished real copper would be the thing, in the former case anything that can be given the dull brownish look of an old copper coin can go.

 

In terms of durability: the bond between copper and the hull is more likely to fail, than the bond of a good quality, acid-free paper and the hull ...

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There are so many people at MSW that have intimate knowledge of so many different things. Anyone have a specific knowledge of paper as a medium (media?). My question is about the most likely best type of paper to use for my experiment. I did a quick search about paper modeling, but most seems to be about using card stock as a material. I want to model in 1/64 scale. The paper should I think be a hot press type to have a smooth surface. The initial coat of paint would be airbrushed acrylic, so it would be fairly dry I think when it contacts the paper.  This is the look I would like to achieve.

 

Kurt

 

376755030_hullcopperplating.thumb.jpeg.c62f89c8609b638c54ac841444c08164.jpeg

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There are so many different paper types with different names and availabilities around the globe that it would be difficult to make specific product recommendations. Rather it may be worthwhile to keep some criteria and possible issues in mind:

 

- paper is rated not by its thickness, but by its weight per area, viz. in Europe g/m^2; the fewer grams the thinner the paper obviously.

 

- ideally the paper should be acid-free, but it may be difficult to find thin enough paper that is guaranteed to be acid free.

 

- bonded paper (i.e. that is soaked with some sort of glue and often additives, such clays or pigments) is smoother and gives a cleaner cutting edge; however, unbonded paper would stick better to surfaces, because the glue used would penetrate it better; one may need to find a trade-off.

 

Having said this, I would probably look towards the kind of paper that was used in the old typewriter-days to make carbon copies ('cc.'); they seem to come in unbonded and slightly bonded varieties and are very thin - the paper that was used in model aircraft would be another option; this paper I would spread onto a piece of cardboard that is coverd in clingfilm; the next step would be to treat the paper with a very thin coating of wood sanding-filler; this coating stabilises the paper that now can be cleanly cut; it also somewhat waterproofs the paper so that it can be glued with PVA without shrivelling; the coppering strakes can be either glued on with the said PVA or, indeed, with more sanding filler; the latter would soften the pre-treated paper, so that the plate overlaps can be reproduced more neatly, but is more tricky in handling; I would attach a strake at one end, let it dry and then work my way along with diluted sanding filler, pushing the paper down with a not too hard bristle brush; such 'coppering' should stick very well to a wooden hull.

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