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Dear all

 

I have quite a lot of very nice maple sheets. They started off very flat and ended up massively warped. Any suggestions if these can be saved and how?

I am thinking soaking for a couple of hours in water and compressing.

 

Vaddoc

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Pre-bend planking:  looks like a feature you should have paid more for. ;)

 

I would just wet the areas with the hardest bends/twists to avoid creating fuzzy grain and water stain.  Maybe heat with hot iron.  The longer, slower bends should straighten out as needed, although if you're planning to rip into strips, they could be awkward.

 

What is the intended use? 

 

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Which component is this intended to be used for?

It is too thin for frame timbers  - except for miniature scales.  In which case - not safe even if flattened.

Deck planks - not safe.

By not safe - what I mean is that the wood is showing where it wants to go.  Even if you flatten it, it will "want" to go back to this shape.

Hull planking - already a good start for conforming to frame contours  - it may prove to be  a challenge to rip if it can't be pushed flat as is.

 

If you still wish to flatten, rather than a water soak, try steam.  A steam iron or hand steam generator clearer and a lot of weight.

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It appears that the material pictured is veneer, rather than sawed wood. Veneer is cut from a rotating log by means of a sharp blade. It's like an apple peel, rather than a cut piece. As a result, when veneer "relaxes," or re-absorbs moisture after kiln-drying, it will look exactly like the wood you've pictured. Sawed wood strips will hold their shape far more reliably, as they are cut with the grain, rather than being peeled from the log by slicing across the grain and then flattened out. In short, it is under stress from the git-go.

 

If you can "moisturize" it by increasing its moisture content (which means increasing the moisture throughout the piece, not just getting it wet on the outside,) it can then be put in a press of some sort and left to dry some. That should flatten it pretty well, although it will always want to "go its own way" if it reabsorbs moisture when the humidity rises. That may not be a problem if it is by then well-fastened, but it's hard to be sure. The forces generated by moving wood are surprisingly high. For this reason, I only rarely use veneer-cut wood on models and then only small pieces that are well secured. 

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Thanks Bob

 

I honestly do not think it is veneer. I bought from a well known high quality source and it is almost certainly sawn timber. At 2 mm thickness it is unlikely to be veneer and maple veneer is not really used very much. I think that either the tree had a hard childhood resulting in grain abnormalities or I stored it improperly.

I ll thoroughly wet a sheet when I find the time and compress it, maybe it will flatten. I ll post the results

 

 

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A close look at the end grain directions should reveal if it's sawn or peeled. If you can add heat to the equation, you may be able to bend it back to flat again. Simply getting it we won't likely do much. Given the thickness, it should be capable of being bent to where you want it. Myself, I'd keep it, stored flat, perhaps with some weights on top, and see how it goes. When it came time to use, I'd heat-bend it to where I wanted it to go. 

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  • 3 months later...

Dear all

 

I threw the sheets in the bathtub and soak them in very hot water. Then I took them to the garage, flat on the work bench with a sheet of particle board on top and whatever heavy items I had laying around pressing down. I repeated this cycle twice.

 

Much improved situation, some sheets better than others. Some are dead flat, others have one edge straight and the other a bit wavy, others still a bit wavy. They are all however usable now.

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