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On 11/5/2019 at 6:57 AM, marktiedens said:

Wow - very nicely done!

 

Mark

 

Thanks Mark a lot of filing planks to shape but the end result I do like.

 

On 11/5/2019 at 4:17 PM, md1400cs said:

Well your superb deck won't be covered in paint - but clear "marine lacquer" - perfect!- your attention to scaled details are simply a pleasure to look at.:imNotWorthy: 

 

Thanks Michael I was thinking of using one or the other of these, what do you think, also thinking of Danish Oil

 

yHvFaE.jpg

 

8r27x1.jpg

 

Regards

Richard

 

 

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Thought I would show a few more pictures of the coamings, the small grove in each I made with a tool I made up.

 

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Next up I have built the Bowsprit, Bowsprit bits, Samson post, Windlass & Counter Shaft, Jumbo Jib Boom Crutch and last the engine and clutch cover boxes

 

Bowsprit I made from a square piece of wood and filed, sanded to shape, note bottom of Bowsprit is straight and tapers on top

 

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Made the Batterns for Jib stops and just pined these for now will glue once I mount, wont be able to go through hole 

 

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Here are some pic's of the Counter shaft assembly and Jumbo jib boom crutch

 

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And this is how it all looks

 

I9LUWt.jpg

 

REgards

Richard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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On 11/15/2019 at 12:41 AM, Retired guy said:

 

Thanks Mark a lot of filing planks to shape but the end result I do like.

 

 

Thanks Michael I was thinking of using one or the other of these, what do you think, also thinking of Danish Oil

 

yHvFaE.jpg

 

8r27x1.jpg

 

Regards

Richard

 

 

Richard,

 

In MVHO Watco is the "go to" option. I know many builders protect their work with Varathane types of sealers. Again just my very own personal opinion - I typically don't like the "looks" that result.

I totally understand why builders add sealers - time would dry timbers, glues etc - protection is important. That said my Santa Maria was Watcco'd 43 years ago and still looks exactly the same. My second build (Vasa) no sealing at all. It will be the same for my current 3rd build. In any case it won't be "my" problem in the future - just my son's haha

 

Lastly  your skills with planking are so perfectly in scale - I would think that certain types of sealers would look "out of scale" given the quality of your work. And looking at your new posts those skills are continuing in Spades.

 

Cheers,

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9 hours ago, md1400cs said:

Richard,

 

In MVHO Watco is the "go to" option. I know many builders protect their work with Varathane types of sealers. Again just my very own personal opinion - I typically don't like the "looks" that result.

I totally understand why builders add sealers - time would dry timbers, glues etc - protection is important. That said my Santa Maria was Watcco'd 43 years ago and still looks exactly the same. My second build (Vasa) no sealing at all. It will be the same for my current 3rd build. In any case it won't be "my" problem in the future - just my son's haha

 

Lastly  your skills with planking are so perfectly in scale - I would think that certain types of sealers would look "out of scale" given the quality of your work. And looking at your new posts those skills are continuing in Spades.

 

Cheers,

 

Did a test on wood and yes the Tung oil will be used once I glue all deck pieces and thanks very much for your kind words.

 

Regards

Richard

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I have always loved the lines of this sleek lady.  And your craftmanship w/wood has again shown those lines.  I have never built a Bluenose and for some time have looked at different kits of.  After seeing what you have done and wanting to give a hull shape like this ago, I pulled the trigger and ordered a AL Bluenose II.  I did look at the Model Shipways and decided was too complicated.  Then I looked at Billing Boats versions, but one was just too big and the other was one of their 600 series, you build in two halves and then join the two.  I have never been too found of this, kind of outside my scope of how it is done!  So I saw the AL kit f/Bluenose II and it fit the requirements for what I was looking for.  Though not as detailed in construction/method as the Shipways.  I also ordered the book Bluenose II Saga of the Great Fishing Schooners, LB Jensen.  So w/this info, hope to turn the AL kit into a decent replica.  From photos I have looked at of the deck and furniture/fittings, AL did a pretty good job.  Have seen some areas that need attention, but nothing overly complicated.  Look forward to more of your thread.  What paint did you use for the bottom.  I am a fan of Danish Oil and how it brings wood to life.  Really liked the home made cut tool.  Thanks for sharing.

Rick 

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On 11/21/2019 at 11:02 PM, mugje said:

You did a wonderful job! Also regarding the pictures by the way👍

 

Thanks very much Mugje she is look quite good,  I am very pleased with the way she has gone together seeing this is my second wood frame ship. 

 

10 hours ago, CPDDET said:

Your skill in building is amazing. Thank you for sharing !

Perhaps you could enlighten me on how you cut the slits in the cap rail for the chainplates?

 

Dave

 

Thanks Dave hope the build will help in anyway, regarding your question here is how I made the slits for chainplates

 

Traced the top rail from the drawings marking the slit, transferred tracing to cap rail, the chain rail is .016" thick so I used a .016" drill and drilled two holes in each slit (taking great care to make sure I didn't drill into plank), then used a #11 blade very carefully remove some of the wood in between the holes I had drilled, then I took a 4" swiss file and ground sides to the size of slit, on one flat side I ground it down to the thickness of just under .016" thick and then I carefully filed slit so that I could get the chainplate to go through.

It was quite time consuming but it did work for me, 

 

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4 hours ago, RickyGene said:

I have always loved the lines of this sleek lady.  And your craftmanship w/wood has again shown those lines.  I have never built a Bluenose and for some time have looked at different kits of.  After seeing what you have done and wanting to give a hull shape like this ago, I pulled the trigger and ordered a AL Bluenose II.  I did look at the Model Shipways and decided was too complicated.  Then I looked at Billing Boats versions, but one was just too big and the other was one of their 600 series, you build in two halves and then join the two.  I have never been too found of this, kind of outside my scope of how it is done!  So I saw the AL kit f/Bluenose II and it fit the requirements for what I was looking for.  Though not as detailed in construction/method as the Shipways.  I also ordered the book Bluenose II Saga of the Great Fishing Schooners, LB Jensen.  So w/this info, hope to turn the AL kit into a decent replica.  From photos I have looked at of the deck and furniture/fittings, AL did a pretty good job.  Have seen some areas that need attention, but nothing overly complicated.  Look forward to more of your thread.  What paint did you use for the bottom.  I am a fan of Danish Oil and how it brings wood to life.  Really liked the home made cut tool.  Thanks for sharing.

Rick 

 

Hi Rick we will see another Bluenose in the horizon yeah, I have no idea what the AL kit is like but you will find the Bluenose 11 is different than the first Bluenose, I have also bought the book Bluenose 11 Saga of the great fishing schooner by LB Jensen great book, but you will see that the deck hatches, cabins etc are different between each one, also not sure why the stern is more square than the original Bluenose, anyway hope you will have fun building her just as I am with mine, attached below picture of Bluenose 1921 this pictures is to show stern if this is not allowed please delete.

 

The bottom I prime painted with a mix of floquil railway colours zinc chrome and red oxide will be painting it copper red later, will have an update soon.

 

fdJWyg.jpg

 

 

 

Regards

Richard 

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8 hours ago, RickyGene said:

Thanks for the info.  I thought you cut the grove w/the homemade too/blade.  And thanks f/photo.  Saved.

Rick

 

Hi Rick,

Just to clarify, on post #32 I made the tool/blade to make the groove in the coamings for stern cabin, hatches for deck,  Forward companionway and Forward Cabin skylight on the deck I needed a very small groove. 

I cut the cove in the plank which you have shown with picture above (I think this is what you mean) with my Byrnes table saw

From looking at the picture you posted you can see the stern is different from the picture I posted so you might not need to change the AL Bluenose 11

 

Regards

Richard

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9 hours ago, John A. said:

Very beautiful deck Was there any treenails used to hold on the planks ? I was also wanting to know what color of red paint was used on the hull . I have a Bluenose kit and can not find out about these things. Thanks you for a great build .  John

 

Hi John thank you for your post, did not use treenails just glued each plank along edges very carefully, if you look at the pictures above (the one I posted of the first Bluenose and the other which Rick posted) you don't really see the treenails some people put them in and others don't. Paint which is on there is primer, top coat will be a Copper/Red. 

Which Bluenose do you have?

If you look in the Nautical research Guild you will find a Bluenose Practicum which has a lot of info hope this helps.

 

Again thanks for looking in

 

Regards

Richard 

 

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hope everyone had a great Christmas and to all a happy new year :champagne:

 

Made both masts out of 3/4" round Cherry, both were machined and then sanded down to 5/16" dia at bottom and 3/16" at the top, then made the Fore and main top masts out of supplied square wood and sanded them to 11/64 x 11/64 square then round 11/64" dia to 7/64" dia, these masts are quite detailed as per the drawings below

 

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Below are how they came out, all bands, eyebolts, sheaves, hinges, crane parts, gooseneck parts etc I made from brass, do still have to add some detail then paint white where it says to do. 

 

Fore Mast

 

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Main Mast

 

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Until next time 

 

Regards

Richard

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Richard,

 

As always dropping by your shipyard is a real treat - your work with metals combined with wood is superlative -beyond  well done indeed. And the scaling of these bits together is just first class.

Nice informative sheets as well.

 

Cheers,

Edited by md1400cs
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18 hours ago, CPDDET said:

Beautiful workmanship. Curious as to the type of brass stock used for the banding.

Hi Dave, thanks very much, I used .010" brass sheet and I have a brilliant shear which I can cut down to .001" brass shim, this helps in any metal work which needs to be made closer to the scale ship you are working on, so .010" x 64 = .64" just over 5/8" thick which to me sounds about right but still have not found any info on how thick they should be.

Also buy .005",  .003", .002" and .001" brass  

 

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Happy new year to you

Regards

Richard

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13 hours ago, mugje said:

Beautiful indeed! I asume this is kit modified? Or is this kit so detailed?

Thanks a lot Mugje, I am following the six sets of plans which come with the model and they are very detailed, so I have had to figuring out how to build each piece as close to scale as possible, so I can't call this modified except I am sometimes using different wood than what is supplied in the box.

 

zZ9fbx.jpg

 

This is how I built the goose neck made out of a piece of 1/8" square brass stock, started by drilling three holes and then filing to shape, did the same to the crane part which is below the Trestle Tree

 

bTZLRE.jpg

 

SrXZVl.jpg

 

aqenLA.jpg

 

Happy New Year

 

Regards

Richard

 

 

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5 hours ago, md1400cs said:

Richard,

 

As always dropping by your shipyard is a real treat - your work with metals combined with wood is superlative -beyond  well done indeed. And the scaling of these bits together is just first class.

Nice informative sheets as well.

 

Cheers,

 

Thanks very much Michael, I was looking at your lovely ship you have just finished I can say the same goes to you, brilliant model well done. 

Working with wood and metal go hand in hand on these ships and I love trying to figure out how to build very small pieces. Regarding the informative sheets they are small pictures of the drawings see above.

 

Happy New Year to you

 

Regards

Richard

   

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Hi Ron, thanks very much do like the lines of this Schooner, the shear is made commercially by PEPE Tools this is a 6" precision Guillotine made in USA, and I bought it from Gesswein Jewellery Tools & Supplies back in 2011, I just went to the site gessweincanada.com looked and looked under Shears could not find the one I have but they have different ones now, (do like the the new ones) they are expensive but if you need something to cut very thin material you have to spend the money, I am not affiliated with this company just a satisfied customer.

 

Hope this helps

 

Regards

Richard 

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Thank you. I searched the web and found pepetools.com. They make a whole line of nice tools, and apparently have just done some realignment of the business and have moved all operations back to the US. The 4inch shear is about $450. Looks like it's available through Amazon.

It would not be a hard tool to make, but I already have more projects on my list than I will ever complete.

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2 hours ago, CPDDET said:

Would a bench shear work as well as a guillotine shear? I see Eastwood makes an 8 inch bench shear that has great reviews. 

But not having any experience with any type of shear I don't know.

 

Dave

 

Hi Dave, just looked at the Eastwood shear and it looks good but I don't know if it would cut .005", .010" shim stock or brass because if the shear blades surfaces don't touch or not very sharp it will just bend the brass instead of cutting, also shearing will bend the piece you are cutting (same as a small pair of tin snips of small hand shears0 which means you would have to straighten the piece out which is not a big deal, when I cut with my guillotine I get a very very small twist.

 

You could use your Brass strips which come with the kit 1/64" x 1/16" for the banding.

 

Happy New Year Dave

Regards

Richard

  

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