Jump to content
drobinson02199

Bruma by drobinson02199 - Mantua/Panart - Scale 1:43

Recommended Posts

I'm starting the Bruma, which I chose to give me something hopefully less complex and long than the Cutty Sark.

 

Here are some "What's In the Box" Pics.  It's wood, laser cut sheets, some fittings, and plan sheets.  The instructions are printed on the back of one of the plan sheets (in several languages).  The English instructions are about one column length, including the parts list.  What I'm going to do is scan them so I can print them out and still be able to use the other side of the plan sheet.

 

Regards,

David

In the Box 1.jpg

In the Box 2.jpg

In the Box 3.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Started the deck planking.  Nice pattern of alternating wide basswood and narrow walnut, with curve following the line of the boat.  Will look nice when sanded and finished.  The rough spot at the stern will fortunately be covered.

 

Now the trick will be to get the other side lined up exactly with this one where it butts at the center line.

 

Regards,

David

Deck 1.jpg

Deck 2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Deck planking now finished.  

 

For those of you following the "alignment" saga on port & starboard sides, I have some close ups.  At the bow, I was only able to maintain it (barely) by using stealers, and you can see them in the close-up.

 

At the stern, it's aligned at the very stern -- but that will be covered.  Moving toward midships, the alignment falls off and I couldn't maintain it.

 

The issue is the angle at which the basswood planks hit the centerline.  That angle determines the width of the butted edge, and if the angle coming in on the second side you plank is slightly different (which is almost inevitable, I think), you can't maintain alignment.

 

Ah well, I'm happy with the end result.

 

Regards,

David

Deck 1.jpg

Deck 2.jpg

Deck 3.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This looks like an interesting build David. I will follow along with interest. All the best to you and your family for the season!

 

Cheers

 

Chris

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rick:

 

I don't think so -- but what might have helped is if I had started at the king plank and worked outward, vs. the other way.  But that would have required some heavier work at the edges of the deck, and some real planning to get the starting angles right.

 

Regards,

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a steamer when I'm planking, which gives these basswood planks a lot of flex.  I had too much bulge at the stern, so to adjust it I did the following as shown in the picture:

  • Used a rotary cutter to make a shallow "V" so that I could bend the whole structure down
  • Installed the next plank, steamed the "V" area, and then used reinforcing ribs behind to attach the "V" area to that next plank
  • Installed a short length of planking behind the "V" to hold the wood filler I'll need.

Then all of this will be sanded down and filled with wood filler to smooth it out.  Fortunately, it's the first layer which is more forgiving.  I think I'll follow the "run of the planks" on the second layer vs. steaming to bend them.

 

Regards,

David

Planking Adjustment.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Working the first planking around the prop shafts.  It's basically an improvizational act, and what I did was to create a "floor" of short planks on top of which I could mount the first planks under the shaft.

 

What you see in the finished picture will be dressed with a housing over the prop shaft to hide the rough area where it enters the hull.  That goes on after the second planking.

 

I am about to go away for a couple of weeks, so won't fill and sand this until I get back.

 

Regards,

David

Prop Shaft 1.jpg

Prop Shaft 2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now working on the second planking and using my trusty steamer to pre-bend the planks.  With that done, they really sit down nicely.  I like a steamer much better than a mechanical plank bender, because the benders leave crimp marks on the underside that can "leak" out at the seams and mar the smooth finish.

 

Regards,

David

Planking 1.jpg

Planking 2.jpg

Planking 3.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a very interesting build and it looks great. Can you elaborate on your "steamer" that you use for bending wood? Is it a steam iron or something else? Thanks.

 

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob:

 

Here's a picture of it.  The brand is "Steam Genie".  If you look closely at the area coming out of the nozzles, you can just barely see steam.

 

The steam flow is pretty strong, and one of the nice things about this is that you can aim it -- so if you have a piece of wood that's partly mounted and the unmounted part won't sit properly, you can steam it on the model.

 

With these basswood planks, which are soft, I just hold sections in the steam jet and bend gently until I get the amount of bend I want.

 

Regards,

David

Steamer.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, David. My wife just told me that we have one of those up in the broom closet. I got it out and the brand we have is Pur Steam and it looks very similar to yours. I've been using a small, non-steam, travel iron and just barely wetting the planks with my finger before using the iron to apply heat and bend the wood. I'm looking forward to trying your steamer method now as well.

 

Bob  

Edited by BobG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Working further on the second planking, at the bow the planks hold pretty straight, but as the hull curves under, I couldn't hold that at the stern and had to shift to a "lay of the plank" approach.  You can see that in the stern detail below.

 

Not sure how much more I'll do on this before leaving for a two week trip.

 

Regards,

David

Plankfit 1.jpg

Plankfit 2.jpg

Plankfit 3.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...