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Martin W

HMS Fly by Martin W - Victory Models - 1/64

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Work on the fo'c'sle continues:

 

In the six weeks (ahem) I've been silent, I've managed to drag my weary self into the boatyard a few evenings to get some of the fo'c'sle details done.  The steam gratings took a surprisingly long time, mostly because I kept making them the wrong size -- first too big, then too little.  The problem is that they're pretty doggone tiny, so that just about any size looks big.  In the end, I decided to go with consistency, and made the coamings the same height as those of the hatches.

 

In between the gratings goes the chimney.  Now, FFM shows the sort of chimney that I would expect on a wind-powered vessel, namely with a forward bent flue to let the smoke pass to the bows.  But, the NMM plans show a straight vertical structure.  Torn between aesthetics and "accuracy" I chose, this time, to go with the plan.

 

                                                        post-1223-0-11842100-1474644596.jpg

 

To make the chimney, I attached a length of dowel to a squarish piece of stock.  You can see it lined up alongside the plans (reduced to 74%, which is just about the right size for this scale).

 

The kit's version would also end up with a vertical structure, but undersized:

 

                                                         post-1223-0-31051400-1474644742.jpg

 

After sanding the wood to conceal as much grain as possible, I put on a coat of sealer, followed by some black stain.  Next I set 2 pieces of bent wire into the top, and attached a round piece of blackened brass on them to give a baffle of sorts:

 

                                                         post-1223-0-11172500-1474644896.jpg

 

And here it is between the steam gratings:

 

                                                         post-1223-0-81350500-1474644959.jpg

You can also see the base in this view.  Many people have added coamings around the chimney, and I think they do give it a finished look.  I can't quite make out if the NMM plans show those or not, but I am thinking of adding them -- very thin versions.

 

Next come the bitts.  Theoretically, the fore topsail sheet bitt standard extends down to the main deck, providing ample strength for the belayed rigging.  Because I simulated those extensions when I made the manger, I was able at least to set the standard into a solid base with brass pins.

 

To make the pins, I used 3/16 stock, and cut timber heads in the tops., making measurements for consistency, then using an x-acto to make the angled cuts.

 

                                                          post-1223-0-16938400-1474645347.jpg

 

These also have a sheave cut into them, and cheek blocks sitting outside each one, made from 5/32x 3/32 boxwood.  To make the sheaves, I used my milling machine, drilling the holes with a 1mm bit (the smallest I have, which seems a might oversized here); then I used the same bit to run a shallow groove between the 2 holes.  I would have liked to angle the holes a touch to give the appearance of roundness, as for the working part of the block; but I just couldn't figure out that technique.

 

I've noticed on a few other builds that the cheek blocks have angled tops.  Mine do look pretty plain -- even puritanical; but I'm hoping there will be enough other Baroque decorations to distract the eye.

 

The cross piece is shaped from 5/32 x 3/32 stock.  It doesn't take much shaping, just some chamfering, and general light sanding.

 

Only the fore jeer bitts have standards. 

 

                                                           post-1223-0-09650000-1474646190.jpg

 

And wouldn't you know, those steam gratings had to get in the way.  These standards have the curious detail of a groove cut into them for access to the block fixed into the pin.  I tried filing my standards down, to get around the gratings, and I considered pulling the gratings up and redoing them at a smaller size.  In the end, I chose the path of least difficulty, and used thinner stock for the standards, thereby eliminating the need for that groove as well.  They definitely look undersized, but my justification is that these don't seem to provide that much support anyway.

 

You can also see in this last picture that I've fashioned something of a breast hook, which is lying on the deck awaiting placement.  According to FFM, there are four iron bolts on each wing of the breast hook holding it on the bulwark.  These bolts I simulated with drops of glue touched with black paint (I used the tip of a needle dipped into paint).

 

Next up is the drift rail, described by Antscherl as "the most challenging rail to make."  I've decided to make mine out of boxwood -- maybe that puritanical strain is growing?

 

But then, again, I took a look at BE's belfry last night, and started thinking that might have some anti-puritanical fun hidden in it.  So maybe I'll go with the curve.

 

Meanwhile, the September 1 deadline that was keeping me from posting regularly has passed, and I got my work in (a close run thing, but I did get it done).  So now I'm hoping to keep more up to date with my log -- though very often the only progress is to hear myself using language I'd never thought I knew.

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

 

 

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Really nice work Martin.  Great job on everything.  

 

Those Fly plans are really detailed, to the point of even detailing the friezes.  Are you going to add them to your Fly?  Will you use photo-etched parts (not sure if the Fly kit has them, the Pegasus does) or paint them on?  I think I'm leaning towards painting them on.

Edited by Landlubber Mike

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Nice work Martin, I would have gone with the NMM plan Chimney as well for Fly. Incidentally the NMM plan for Pegasus shows the angled cowl arrangement, but it's nice to reflect these little differences between ships of the same class.

 

I must admit I went for a simplified arrangement  for the hances on the drift rails, I  ruthlessly suppressed any 'puritanical'  ideas. ;) 

 

B.E.

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Hi Martin

 

Very nice work. I like that chimney. It meets the standard of your galley stove and is even visible!

But I'm afraid you have a tendency to leave the safe path of kit building and come under the influence of the dark arts of scratch building. This could lead to an even more creative language with a tendency to startle yourself again. Beware! :)

 

Cheers

peter

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Thanks for the nice compliments guys -- they really add a lot to this hobby (read:  mild obsession).

 

Mike-- I'm doing without the decorations.  The kit has a photo-etched piece for that, but -- and here is the Puritan in me again -- I like the plain look of the boxwood (I really like the look of boxwood).  Like you, I'm trying to do as little painting as possible; so far, I've only put a brush on the wales, the gunport frames, and the gun carriages.  I'm hoping that I can put that fine camel hair away for a long time.

 

BE -- I think the only way I've seen you express any Puritanism is by making that poor one-handed sailor work as hard as you do.  Your hances are pretty clear in my mind, and I'll be consulting them again.  And again.

 

Peter -- The darkness calls, but my clumsiness has made me stumble enough times that I still walk in the light of plain old kit building (with the odd bash now and then).

 

Thanks for checking in Bob, your build is an inspiration!

 

And thanks for all the likes.

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Hello everybody -- Since it's Halloween, I have to present my version of the Olde Play,  Bats in the Belfry.  (Or maybe just bad joke ^_^ )

 

The lovely Georgian Belfry did catch my fancy after all.  I began with the stanchions, based fundamentally on those shown in FFM. 

 

                                            post-1223-0-67591900-1477951657.jpg

The base is no doubt too wide (as will be proved below).  But this is what I'm going with.

 

Next I devised the curved canopy, simply by starting with some thick stock, measuring to the center, then two points equidistant out from there, and cut out the curved shape.

 

                                             post-1223-0-15308000-1477952594.jpg

 

To cut the molding in the canopy, I first used my mill to cut the lower panels, in a graduated series.  That gave me the basic pattern which I could sand lightly to round over the edges.  For the curved molding, I simply set my thumbnail against the canopy's curve, found they matched pretty well, and then traced the outline of the nail onto the wood, and lightly, ever so lightly began scraping with the backside of an exacto blade.  For the headstock, I followed the same strategy as the belfry, but in simpler, stockier form.  I used blackened card for the iron straps, and the kit's bell.  Here's the finished belfry:

 

                                            post-1223-0-82854700-1477952205.jpg

Actually, this is Belfry 3.0, the first few tries finding a better home in the scrap pile -- but I'm discreetly drawing a veil over those details.

 

Now the spar racks teased me a bit.  I couldn't really work out a solid basis for any dimensions.  The kit plans don't show the rack, but simply an inner railing.  What I came up with is based on the overall length of the breast railing/belfry/spar rack configuration, allowing room for a scaled seaman to pass by (in the fuzzy video of Master and Commander that runs through my head). 

 

In short, I worked out these two:

 

                                             post-1223-0-11343200-1477952550.jpg

 

After a bit of consideration, and the simple test of laying a spar in the rack to see how it fit, I found that they needed some filing and refining.

 

Then came the slow process of the rail.  The stanchions were easy, as I cut the timberheads with the exacto, and the sheaves with the mill.  The railings required careful measuring for the placement of the stanchions, cutting the mortises for the stanchions, then scraping the molding on the edges.  I followed the advice of FFM of gluing a thin (molded) strip along one edge to close in the stanchions, and it worked brilliantly.  Until I found that I needed to file the ends off the rails a bit since they overlapped the spar rack, at which point the ends fractured at the out corner of the mortise.  Repeatedly.   Finally, I just took the bit that had broken off and glued it onto the stanchion as it stood in the rail:

 

                                              post-1223-0-00397700-1477953060.jpg

If you look more closely than politeness dictates, you'll notice the gobs of glue on the port stanchions.  And those were there until they became solid enough to scrape away.

 

I don't know what's next.  Work is, well, work, and lots of it.  As the weather cools, I find being outside very desirable, so my modelling time is even shorter than before.  But Fly still calls to me.

 

Meanwhile, following Peter (aka Flyer) and BE's gestures of presenting lovely views from their different treks, I thought I might offer a view from my study window:

 

                                              post-1223-0-50744100-1477953375.jpg

 

It ain't the Lake District, it ain't Iceland, but it's what the Southern Plains has to offer on a mild day.

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

 

 

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Nice work Martin, neat job on those stanchion sheaves and I love the belfry.

 

Great view from your window, looks just like an English woodland scene I am so familiar with.

 

Ps: Where is the rolling prairie and corn as high as an elephants eye

 

B.E.

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Thanks for the nice words, BE and Bob.  And thanks for the likes.

 

BE, the last elephantine creature to pass through here said goodbye during the ice age.  And most of the corn I see usually reaches only about as high as a spaniel's eye, since our annual rainfall is what you'd expect in a week.  Just about 2 miles in the direction opposite to the photographic view is the Indian Meridian, where all the land rush pilgrims lined up in 1889.  From there on out to the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in New Mexico, the land is about as flat as you could ever imagine.

 

I guess I've deferred that Drift Rail long enough.  The next few evenings will probably find me just trying to visualize it.

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Thanks for the support, Mike and Peter, it does make diving into those tiny details seem actually less daunting.

 

Peter -- on almost any given day, cows can be heard mooing from my back porch (no bells, I'm afraid); and at night, along with the owls, coyotes can be heard howling.  And then yesterday, we got a visitor who decided that our front porch made for pleasant perch:

 

                                        post-1223-0-76283200-1478098286.jpg

 

I don't know if you see many of these roadrunners in Switzerland, England, or even DC (unless you're inclined to watch cartoons).

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Hi Martin

 

No, our roadrunners are usually less beautiful and wear jogging shoes, but don't get attacked by coyotes (only hawks - happened to a friend of mine).

But that deck! Did you really swab it this morning??

 

Take care

peter

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Har!  I don't know if it would count in the category of "Life as We Know It," BE, but it's my life (at least till I retire to colder climes).

 

Peter, I think this guy was looking for some jogging shoes.  And the good thing about the "Wind sweeping down the plain" is that it sometimes blows the detritus off the deck (and then generally blows it back on again the next day).

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Hello everyone -- The temperature outside is about 8 degrees on the F scale, so it seems like a good time to pick up where I left off on my log some TWO MONTHS ago ( :o ).

 

I've been attending to details around the upper hull, and mostly the channels. I used 1/16" boxwood stock, cut to width on the Byrnes. I like the look that FFM gives the channels with the tapered section to the rear, so I used that as my model, and marked the notches for the chainplates/deadeyes from the kit-supplied channels.  The kits plans don't show the eye bolts (and FFM actually describes them as swivel ring bolts, which would definitely go beyond my ability), but I determined their placement from FFM's diagrams.

 

 

 

Here's the fore channel and stool in place:

 

 

                                                       post-1223-0-66880100-1483808126.jpg

 

                                                           

 

You can see that I followed the "controversial" suggestion in FFM (2:156-160) of adding the standards.  These really do add a nice touch to the overall appearance of the build -- much like a corbel table on a handsome building.  The channels in the above photo struck me as much too small, though, so I pulled them off and made some larger versions.

 

My procedure was simply to glue a stack of about 4 or 5 pieces of 1/16" stock cut into 7/32" squares, and then marking the rough shape I wanted on the outer layer.  I cut the shape out with a jeweller's saw, filed it down close to the line, then unglued the stack.  I thus achieved a kind of consistency, but I still needed to shape the individual standards to fit the angle of the bulwark and channel (and to smooth the edges).

 

Here's the main channel, without any polyurethane:

 

                                                          post-1223-0-15996000-1483809426.jpg

 

The length of this channel gave me some problems in placement, as I held it in place with one hand to mark the location of the holes to be drilled in the bulwark for the connecting pins.  This was one of those occasions when I could really have used a third hand -- I ended up drilling too many holes, but I don't think they're terribly noticeable (don't look for them, please!).

 

Next came the fenders and steps.  The fenders have a slight taper on the edges facing away from each other, but remain parallel on their inside, facing edges.  This makes for a curious look, but interesting nonetheless.

 

For the steps, i started with 3/32" stock cut into 6-inch strips.  I passed these over a .30 inch blade on the Byrnes, first setting the blade 1/16" high and the fence at 1/32" to mark the tread.  I then lowered the blade to 1/32" and set the fence to make a 1/16" wide cut.  I then cut the individual steps at 1/2" lengths, and notched the sides following the same procedure that I used on the front.

 

Here's the result:

 

                                                       post-1223-0-31168100-1483810590.jpg

 

The oar port creates a problem.  You can see that I notched the step above the port.  And I know that Blue Ensign shortened the step below the port to accommodate the oar.  I decided that the oarsman would have to defer to the officers who would use the steps, and kept my lengths consistent.

 

After this picture was taken, I painted the 2 steps on the wales black, which makes them almost disappear.

 

Next I started on the swivel gun mounts.  The kit's mounts extend only a short way down the bulwark to allow for the photo-etched decoration.  Since I'm neither applying the PE version, nor painting the decoration on, I decided to follow the NMM plans, which show the mounts extending almost all the way to the channels.

 

The mounts along the fo'c'sle seem odd in that they aren't high enough for a 1:64 sailor to fire the gun while standing.  But that does seem to be the correct height, at least on the fo'c'sle.

 

Following the diagram on FFM 2: 161, I cut 3/4" lengths from 1/8" stock.  I measured 1/32" in from each side to mark the bevels:

 

 

                                                      post-1223-0-81053600-1483811372.jpg

 

 

After I cut the edges down and sanded them, I filed off the bottom:

 

                                                     post-1223-0-54337700-1483811585.jpg

 

For the reinforcing loop along the top, I simply used a strip of blackened card.  To attach the mounts, I cut the heads off some pins, then hammered the point over to simulate a crimped nail:

 

                                                     post-1223-0-72283000-1483811731.jpg

 

As I moved around the fo'c'sle, I found that I needed to file the inside of each mount to fit the bulwark properly.  They are supposed to lean inward, but mine are pretty much on the vertical.

 

                                                     post-1223-0-03281800-1483811862.jpg

 

The temperature is set to rise up into the 40s today, but I think I'll mostly stay in the boatyard (the ground is probably too slippery to be going out and cutting cedar).  Who knows, maybe I'll get a posting up sooner than March.  B)

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Nice touch shaping the Fore Channels Martin, and neat profiling on the Swivel mounts.

 

I'm not convinced that my individual approach to the Entry steps will stand the test of time, but I always thought that it was a simple adjustment to make to revert to the plan configuration.

 

B.E.

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Thanks for checking in, guys, and thanks to those who clicked the like button.

 

Bob -- There's a good chance you'll be getting some kind of winter, since what hit here is moving east.

 

Mike -- Thanks for the compliment.  Your Charles W. Morgan is looking really good, and is off to an impressive start.

 

BE -- Whether your steps stand the temporal test or not, they do respond to the problem of having the steps in the same place as the oar port.  Part of the entertainment in modelling is worrying over these little issues and wondering if they belong just to the model or were evident in the 18th-century ship.

 

Today I'm off to feed my horse a pile of carrots, which she doesn't need.

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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And now for that Drift Rail.

 

I cut a variety of scraping patterns in hopes of having each rail different.  But at this scale, the patterns either failed or looked the same.  (The failure has to do with the fact that I'm using a very tiny cutting disk mounted on my milling machine, and it can only cut straight lines.)

 

One problem I had was in figuring out the placement.  I thought logic might dictate that it would line up at the same distance above the channels (which will have their own molding) that the channels lie above the lower rail.  But that led to a problem like this:

 

                                        post-1223-0-57093200-1486250428.jpg

 

That notch is just too ugly.  So I lowered it to this level:

 

                                        post-1223-0-49223400-1486250549.jpg

 

That had the advantage of giving me the line of the plank to follow.  One little challenge was to cut a piece small enough to fit between the standard and the swivel gun mount.  The boxwood showed once again why it's a pleasure to work with (if the chisel is sharp ;) ), and it didn't crumble at all.

 

                                        post-1223-0-94912500-1486250781.jpg

 

The bigger challenge comes with the actual drift.  For this I cut to length the angled piece on some 1/16" thick stock, used my chisels to cut the angle itself and to trim the length down to 1/16" width to match the rest of the molding.  Then I simply scraped the pattern in. 

 

                                        post-1223-0-30841800-1486251152.jpg

 

The angled joint at the bottom doesn't please me very much.  The piece I originally cut before gluing on the drift broke, so I had to make a guess at the angle for the second piece.  As a consequence the pattern of the molding doesn't line up, nor does the joint itself.  In about 5 minutes, though, I'm going to apply a gentle stroke of the sanding stick to see if I can smooth it out a bit.

 

There's plenty more to be done on the drift rail, as it moves forward, and along the fo'c'sle.  Since my chain saw has gone on strike, I'm not going to be cutting cedar tomorrow, so I might as well cut molding, eh?

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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I've been asked to post a full-on shot, so here are two, just to show everything as it now is.  I want to point out as well that I tidied up the place before bringing in the camera.  :D

 

                                                   post-1223-0-22789700-1486337397.jpg

 

 

 

 

                                                    post-1223-0-57611100-1486337380.jpg

 

Cheers to all, and thanks for the likes, Bob & Spy!!

 

Martin

Edited by Martin W

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Kudos Martin for  providing your Fly with a decorative Drift rail, a tricky job on such a narrow rail.

The Board would simply not sanction such fripperies on my Pegasus so a plain rail it was, although they did grudgingly sanction a simple ogee pattern for the Waist Rail.

 

I think yours looks good, but take heart much of it will disappear behind the shroud rigging and Anchors so don't over fret about . :) 

 

onwards Sir, onwards.

 

B.E.

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Martin, looks fantastic.  Very nice job!  It's funny, when we work at such scales and post pictures, the rails look pretty wide.  You have to step back and remember that these rails are only 2mm in width or less, and that people won't be looking at these details with a magnifying glass six inches away :)

 

Love the mounts by the way - she's looking very imposing now :) 

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Thanks for the encouraging words, guys, they really matter.

 

BE -- I have to laugh: the rails will be hidden, just as the Captain's cabin, with the bulkheads and the cherry window seat, and the manger will all be hidden (I didn't carve a tiny sheep and cow, but I thought of it).  And the galley stove is mostly hidden.  But all that is part of the Sport of Modelling, isn't it?  B)  

 

Mike -- it's always good to have you drop by.  Yes, the swivel mounts will surely command viewers' focus more than that itty bitty rail.  But whenever I look at my Rattlesnake, I find myself zeroing in on some detail and thinking, hmm, that's interesting -- and then I remember, Hey, I put that there!  The factors guiding the little things are a kind of uneven desire for completeness (I've left lots off), but even more a curiosity about whether you can get it to work at 1/64.

 

Don -- Boxwood (ie, castello) is very, very nice to work with.  I wish I had a huge chunk of it to carve full scale out in my workshop (where I'm currently carving an 8 inch block of cherry).  I don't know of any other wood that holds lines so well.

 

Glad you like the pictures, Doug.  You've inspired me to take some more at mid-range to show both the details and the context.  I'll post them soon, when I make enough progress to post another update.

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Hi Martin

 

Nice progress and nice working place. I wouldn't have the patience to add all those details - I am probably too eager to see a build finished.

On the other hand, 'building under the influence' - I noticed that bottle of IPA on your workbench - , might help and increase your patience. Would you recommend it?

 

Cheers :cheers:

peter

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