Long9Ron

H.M.S. Triton Cross Section by Long9Ron - Scale 1:48

147 posts in this topic

Nice set up for bending the beams,   I wonder should one overbend the beams some to account for any spring back to original shape, or will it dry enough to maintain the shape in the jig??  Will wait and see :)

 

Pete

 

Will wait and see what happens for a couple of days. I'm in no rush for the beams right now and I can always re-soak and bend them again if needed. 

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That is a neat jig. If you are going to bend the beams, I think that overbending them slightly is a good idea.

 

Russ

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Hi Ron, When I bent my deck beams I did over bend them by about 1/32"

and they came back to the correct camber but then I only let them sit for 24hrs.

Everything is looking good. :)

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Well the beams bent ok, let them dry for a few days. 

 

post-327-0-46423000-1364145596.jpg

 

post-327-0-26394400-1364145600.jpg

 

post-327-0-04418700-1364145602.jpg

 

I can see a little mold spot on one of the lower beams. 

 

 

 

 

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Ron,

Thanks for showing your bending jig. Man, glad you gents are leading the way. Great work.

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Thanks for the kind words Pete and Paddy.

 

I believe that my build will be a build for other ship modelers to learn  ---  WHAT NOT TO DO  ----  

 

I have done some planking and it will be a while before I will be doing any beam work. I will be doing some treenails first among other things. But, meanwhile I have found that when I temporarily laid the beams across for the lower deck to see how everything lined up, I noticed that one corner was higher than the other three. Oops    :angry: I contribute this to my making of  bad frames and rushing the job. . I considered starting all over, but have decided against it due to the fact that this is my first build in 50 years  and I will be able to correct this by adjusting one of the planks. Also, after I have finished the model, it will be a reminder to me of the things that can go wrong unless you take the time to think things through.

Lesson # 2 Think twice before doing anything.

Lesson # 3 Follow the plans closely and anticipate what is ahead.

 

Anyway, A few pictures of what I have to this point. No pictures of the beams out of alignment because I'm in the process of correcting the mistake (or covering up my mistake). 

 

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post-327-0-50667900-1364354565_thumb.jpg

 

post-327-0-26164800-1364354567_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

 

  

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Mistakes are part of the process. Most often, we learn by doing. The ceiling planking looks good. Good luck fixing the deck beam alignment problem.

 

Russ

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Also you will notice mistakes but is highly unlikely anyone else will. Often putting hi-resolution photos up also makes you think - urgh gap, horrible! but when you view with eyes most people see the good and fail to recognize what is often a tiny bad.

 

It is good to even to be able to recognize these things though.

 

Joss

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Planking looks really nice.

 

Its not a mistake  it is a learning experience and teaching aid...... :D

Edited by Pete38

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Nice job Ron.You have a beautiful build going.

I see my own mistakes but seldom see other peoples mistakes.

Larry

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Thank you everyone for your kind words. 

 

I have learned from my mistakes and the mistakes of others. I will most likely make more along the way, but oh well, that's the learning process and that's how I will end up making a better model next time. Right?

 

So, when I get my corrections done,  :D I will post some more pictures.

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Just a note: I had to re-soak my second batch of beams because when I set them up I allowed for a little over bending and when they dried they didn't dry to the proper camber of the beam. So, I'm trying it again just with the proper camber only. The first batch came out just fine. 

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Checked on the second batch of bending the beams. They turned out okay. 

 

Meanwhile, marked the treenails holes (360 holes). 

 

post-327-0-49581400-1364752970_thumb.jpg

 

Drilled 180 holes by hand and installed natural colored toothpicks in most of the holes. Toothpick forest. I'm almost halfway on the treenails...

 

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Will be installing toothpicks for a while and then sanding them all down flush. Will take a while.

 

Found out that my frames are made of Oak and the planking is Douglas Fir. The wood was from an old recliner that was taken apart. Meanwhile, my neighbor has given me some solid maple and some nice looking Yellow Cedar. He says that I can get all the wood off of him for free, he is a cabinet maker.  Cool. I like saving money.  :)

 

 

harvey1847 and bbrockel like this

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I'm with you.  I like to re-purpose wood.  My neighbors are helping stock my wood pile.     :)

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As Peter Goodwin might say 'look at all those Trennals'. :) Looking good Ron. BTW, great neighbors you have. 

Edited by Paddy

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Thanks everyone.

 

The neighbors are very nice. Also, gave me a table saw with a 1/2 hp motor and a 15 inch scroll saw. Now I have two scroll saws, in case one breaks down. I love it when they clean out the garage in the spring.  :)

 

Well back to cutting down my forest. Time to harvest.

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Ron,

nice job with the treenails, it's certainly a bit spiky in there. Btw, the limber boards aren't treenailed, they were meant to be loose to allow easy removal for cleaning access.

 

Regards,

Grant.

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Ron,

nice job with the treenails, it's certainly a bit spiky in there. Btw, the limber boards aren't treenailed, they were meant to be loose to allow easy removal for cleaning access.

 

Regards,

Grant.

 

Grant

Thanks for the comment on the limber boards. I didn't know that. I will try and repair that somehow.

 

Also, I have about 360 treenails that I have to sand down flush. Do you know of a good procedure for doing that?

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Hi Ron,

 

Love the toothpick forest picture! I nipped the treenails as close to the planking

as I could and then used some folded over150 grit sandpaper and carefully

worked my way over the planks trying not to sand down the taller planks.

 

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Ron,

I cut mine slightly above the planking with side cut pliers, gave them a rough clean up with a small square section file (itis slightly narrower than the planks), then finished the job with narrow sanding sticks/blocks.

 

Regards,

Grant.

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Just can't help myself at times.

 

Lawn Mower and Chain Saw!!!

 

LOL

 

Planning on using a sharp knife then finish off sand paper. Might use some mounted on a motor tool.

Don't like the idea of using a nail clipper as some say due to crushing in of the fibers of the tree nail. But shall know more when I finally get there.

 

Later 42rocker

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Ron,

 

If you haven't put in the treenails into the limber boards, leave the holes and score a line from port to starboard to cross the middle of the hole.  The limberboards were about 3 to 5 feet long with drainage holes.  Any water that found it's way down there would then runoff through the holes and into the limber channel so it could be scavaged by the pumps.   The boards were removable so the channels could be cleaned of debris.

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Looking good with all the treenail in place. I used side cutters to trim close then sandpaper wrapped around a 5mm stick. Sanded one board at a time.

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Thanks everyone on how to cut and sand. I first cut the toothpicks at the base and then I started to sand the them down by using my Dremel tool but quickly stopped as it was not the thing to do. I then did as Snowmans suggested I used a small block of wood wrapped with 150 grit and sanded each board. Slower process but it worked just fine. Learn as you go.. 

 

Mark

I already had the treenails installed in the limber boards, so I used Isopropyl alcohol to loosen the wood glue and then removed them. I will be making new ones soon. But. thanks for the suggestion. Question: Do you think that when I make the new limber boards that I should make them to scale as you suggest (3 to 5 feet long) or just one single piece? All the ones that I have seen are one piece.  

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