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Richardjjs

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  1. My thoughts exactly Don't think this poll is fair as it only takes into account votes polled So if 1 person has voted for, say, Euromodels (ie Victory Models) and no body else has built a Victory MOdels kit then it is TOTALLY misleading
  2. Are you not happy with Corel. THought they where pretty good. Must admit they are more for beginners as the castings are not as good as Mantua and Panart.
  3. Yes looks really good Waiting for my Amati Victory as a completely new project Hopefully it will be released before 2020 Will use this for that
  4. Here are the Amati Copper Plates. Scale 1:64 (Elephant and ne Victory when it become available They are etched so can e attached in "blocks" !:64 comes in 2 sheets of 182 (Half starboard half port) ie 364 in pack PART NO 4392-05 around 15.00 per pack http://www.snmodels.com/en/snshop/fittings-and-accessories/photoetched-copper-plates The 1:72 have far more plate 20.00 ie 500 DONT get you grubby mits on like I have!!
  5. Hi Paul I am sure you know all this Have sent a number of post here an elsewhere about Coppering The main reason for fixing coppering was to prevent the wooden bottom from rotting away. A ship with a copper bottom was abetter Investment than one that did no haver it (Hence a "copper Bottom Investment") According to many ship specialists Copper was laid from the stern forward over lapping the previous plate (AS you say) This helped prevent to forward movement of the ship tearing of the plates Initially metal nails where used but that reacted with the copper and salt in the sea and all the plates fell off. Copper nails prevented this British navy ship are supposed to start at the keel and work up. British Maritime ships start at the keel and work down HOWEVER because the plates supplied by Caldercraft are not scale thickness Fitting them from the keel UP means that the overlap shows quite badly when looking down from above (One side of my Victory is plated this way) As this would be the case most of the time I applied the other side from the keel down as it "looks" much better As we know compromises have to be made when modelling to make the model look better. C Napean Longridge talks about lifting the waterline and coppering up slightly towards the bow as it looks better Interestingly Amati are now producing plates (Left and right laid) in a number of scales that only have the main rivitting one side so these can be laid side by side so they LOOK right (ie as though they overlaid) and are also etched so a few can be laid together where there is no narrowing or widening of the planking They are expensive 22.00 for 350 as against 3.20 per thousand from Caldercraft. BUT !! DRAWING ONE is the original plans from the 1:98 scale Victory from Mantua (13 incredible plans) Everything had to be cut out Drawing Two shows the copper starting from the keel Drawing three is my Copper plating starting from the hull Looks great BUT the overlap is very prominent from above Picture Four shows Amati's Plates (1;64 for Elephant and new Victory) NOTE These Mantua plans where the only place I could actually work out where the Wales came on the bow
  6. It would be a shame to hide up that incredible planking. I use wood oil to cover my planking on the S Felipe. Was not happy with the Caldercraft Victory, not sure why, may be the wood. If you do use copper plates try and over lap them they just don't look right next to each other. Start at the Stern (As per full size) and work forward. It should start at the hull BUT this is not proven and the plates tend to show from above GREAT WORK
  7. It would be a shame to hide up that incredible planking. I use wood oil to cover my planking on the S Felipe. Was not happy with the Caldercraft Victory, not sure why, may be the wood. If you do use copper plates try and over lap them they just don't look right next to each other. Start at the Stern (As per full size) and work forward. It should start at the hull BUT this is not proven and the plates tend to show from above GREAT WORK
  8. JUst look at the quality of the Gun Port linings. Mine are terrible by comparison Would agree with the comments about copper plating the planking. Possibly do one side. I actually have the guns run out one One side and the other with the ship close up. Copper plating is again a bone of contention. It was laid like tiles on a roof. Starting from the stern working forward and , I think, on a Royal Navy ship from the keel they where laid over each other. The problem her is that they are too thick and the edges show. Particularly if you start at the keel. Looking down the plates the edges show. Starting at the Waterline and working down it is smoother. Amati do plates that allow them to be laid side by side. They have left and right so they can be laid properly but they are expensive - about 22.00 for 350 ish. They also have an advantage that they are etched so quit large "blocks" could be laid at a time. Allows for the beauty of the hull to be seen Victory has the Lower POrts closed. Probabvly because of the weight of the Guns The rigging of the Guns in the instructions for the model are NOT complete There are three ways to rig the guns. 1. As shown Close for the sea. Note the tackle is rove round the ropes to tidy it all up. Unusable. Actually the barrel should be rove up against the side of the ship 2. Cleared for action. Extra rope coiled by end of tackle (Picture 1) 3. Fired. Gun run out for reloading (Picture 3) NOTE also the tackle to the sides of the ship is Single and double. The rear tackle is two doubles. Have added 3 shots from
  9. Have always found that using a bees wax block does a number of things. Makes the rope lie properly with no fluffing. Make the rope easier to handle and gives it protection against aging But yes Caldercraft parts do not seem as good as I would have expected. The one thing that I am really annoyed about is the finish of the Quarter Galleries and Stern decoration. Apparently you have to Paint the black rectangles between the windows. Not impressed with a model that costs nearly 1000.00
  10. This photo makes me want to strip the planking of and restarting. Bertus work is so clean THis is why I decided to paint it (My Victory from 35-40 years ago was not painted
  11. When you said you replaced all your blocks and Ropes Why was that and what did you use I must admit the holes in the 2 and 3 hole blocks are not all lined up and it does show
  12. This photo makes me want to strip the planking of and restarting. As does the work Bertus THis is why I decided to paint it (My Victory from 35-40 years ago was not painted
  13. This photo makes me want to strip the planking of and restarting. THis is why I decided to paint it (My Victory from 35-40 years ago was not painted) Photos dated april 1992 Actually not as good as I thought . 07011202.PDF 07011201.PDF
  14. Your wood work is so much tidier and neater than mine Are you using Caldercraft's wood Think if you are going to add treenails they should be correct ie at least across the plank ends (Not sure about over the deck beams this might be too much Again look at that actual picture of Victory the tree nails hardly shoe Often its a matter of what looks right In Anatomy of Nelson's Ships Longridge talks about lifting the fore copper slightly higher as it looks right GREAT WORK
  15. Richardjjs

    HMS Victory 001.jpg

    Can we have some more information about this model please Is it a kit or built

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