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archjofo

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About archjofo

  • Birthday 03/17/1958

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  • Website URL
    http://www.segelschiffsmodellbau.com/t643f358-Franzoesische-Korvette-quot-La-Cr-eacute-ole-quot.html

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    Male
  • Location
    Germany, Münchsmünster

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  1. Hi Andrey, Congratulations on the 100th video. Your coverage is not only very informative but also entertaining. Bridging the time until the 101th video is not easy for me. But I wait patiently with anticipation. I am a great admirer of your skills.
  2. Hello, here are two pictures to complement the previous report on travellers for the jib boom and the flying jib boom. Quelle: Rundhölzer, Tauwerk und Segel – Klaus Schrage, Tafel 59 Quelle: Rundhölzer, Tauwerk und Segel – Klaus Schrage, Tafel 60
  3. Hello, I'm still unclear on how to secure the lanyards. In the meantime I have dealt with another detail. It concerns the travelers for the jib boom and the flying jib boom. Here are the results:
  4. Hello, the caps for the elavation thread have been completed in the meantime and then fixed.
  5. @Captain Poison Thank you for your interest and the nice comment. Thanks to all the others for the LIKES. Hello, in the last report the caps for the elavation thread are still missing on the carronades. As you can see below, I make them from brass.
  6. Hello, I'm glad you're still interested in my report. Thank you very much for that. The last guide blocks were attached to the inside of the bulwark in the waterway. In total I have now made 43 blocks (single, double and triple blocks). In addition a picture of the front area of the battery deck: Now in the next step I can attach the ratelines as soon as I have a decision to secure the lanyards.
  7. Hi, to my question of the lanyards for the dead eyes as described in the last post I found another picture. This shows the lanyards of Le Rivoli from 1807. Here is also to see this method of securing the lanyards. Is there really no one who can give me more information about this? Excuse me, but I don't have a higher-resolution image. I hope you can see it.
  8. Hello Friends, since about 6 months the shrouds are set, but I have not yet lashed the lanyards. So I think the shrouds had enough time to stretch, because I have retightened the taljereeps from time to time. Before I can attach the ratlines, I have to tighten the shrouds properly and secure the lanyards. In this respect it has to be clarified how to secure the taljereep correctly after the shroud rope has been set. There were different methods for this. However, in many beautiful ship models this detail is often not correctly reproduced and thus impairs the overall impression. A common method is to secure the taljereep as shown in the following drawing: Source: Rigging Period Ship Models, Lennarth Petersson However, a close look at illustrations of contemporary French ship models at the beginning of the 19th century, including Le Rivoli and La Créole (see detail), reveals that the lanyards was inserted from behind between the deadeye and the shroud and wrapped around the shroud twice in the direction of the bow and once in the direction of the stern. What was done with the end of the taljereep cannot be seen on any of the pictures available to me. Source: Rigging Period Ship Models, Lennarth Petersson However, a close look at illustrations of contemporary French ship models at the beginning of the 19th century, including Le Rivoli and La Créole (see detail), reveals that the lanyards was inserted from behind between the deadeye and the shroud and wrapped around the shroud twice in the direction of the bow and once in the direction of the stern. What was done with the end of the taljereep cannot be seen on any of the pictures available to me. Source: Musée de la Marine Paris - La Crèole After a long search in relevant literature I came across the following picture. This is a more modern way of rigging, but the same principle. The figure Fig. 318 b shows the back of the deadeyes and one can clearly see that the free end of the lanyard was connected to itself by bindings. So I think it is not far off to conclude that the French could have secured the lanyards in this way at the beginning of the 19th century. This could also explain the execution of the Parisian and other contemporary models. Source: Seamanship, S. B. Luce, 1891 At my model stand, with which I have carried out experiments on the ratlines so far, I compared the well-known and the method for securing the taljereeps mentioned above (unfortunately one turn too many). Before I decide on an execution method, I would be grateful for your expert opinions. See you soon ...
  9. Hello dear friends, meanwhile the ropes ladders are also attached to the main mast shrouds. On this picture you can see one of the tiny eyebolts made of brass wire (diameter 0.4 mm), which are necessary for fixing in the waterway.
  10. Hello Micheal, hello Mark, thanks for your kind comments. Also thanks to all for the LIKES. The equipment of the fore shrouds with the ropes ladders on the model has been completed in the meantime. The final fixing of the carrier ropes to the shrouds will be done when the ratlines are attached. In this respect, adjustments are still possible, if necessary. It continues with an update:

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