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Soldering dangerously close to the hull


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If you use a torch that close to the hull, PLEASE have a fire extinguisher handy.  I can see needing to form the chains in place, but surely you can remove them to do the soldering.

 

One thing that can work is resistance soldering - a thin insulator between the chain and the hull would be adequate to protect the hull from the heat.  Resistance soldering gets the metal between the electrodes hot extremely quickly and the electrodes act as heat sinks with the power off.

 

My torch is growing cob webs since I started using a resistance soldering unit again.  Had used a home made one 20 years ago but when my buddy moved we flipped and he got to take it with him.  Stay Brite - a silver bearing solder strong enough for chain plates, etc works good with a resistance soldering unit.

 

Kurt

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I didn't know it was a plastic hull.  I think you need to figure out a way to get the chain parts off the hull.  Supposedly resistance soldering can be done on HO train rail ends with plastic ties w/o damage to the ties but I wouldn't want to take a chance with a plastic hull.

Kurt

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I think what I will do is cut the channels from the outside edge into the slots for the deadeyes so that I can swing the entire deadeye and chain assembly down away from the hull.  That will give about 3/4 of an inch clearance from the hull to do the soldering.  I'll put an alligator clamp heat sink on and slide something behind for a heat shield.  Then I can swing the whole assembly back up into the slot and re close the opening in the channel with styrene.

 

Regards,

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hey guys - you have my interest up regarding the resistance soldering. I have a similar problem like the OP - I need to connect/attach metal parts (brass strip)  around wooden masts. It's mainly 1/16" or 3/32" strip. I have a regular soldering iron and a small torch for hard soldering. I've been nervous about using either in close proximity - maybe 1/8" to 1/4" - to the finished mast for fear of leaving a char mark or burning the paint.

 

Would resistance soldering be an option? If yes, or maybe just in general, what size unit would be good for modeling? I've seen as low powered as 30W to well over 500W.  I have no intention of using this for anything other than scale modeling.  Also is the probe hand piece or the tweezer unit more practical? Could see wanting both but for a first purchase?

Edited by mikiek
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  • 1 year later...

Old thread alert!

But I'll repeat something I just mentioned in another soldering thread: soggy globs of toilet paper (umm, use fresh water...) as heat sinks.

 

I soldered a whole mess of brass rails to brass stanchions, pre-situated in drilled holes on a painted plastic deck... with the soldering taking place as close as 1/4 inch from the deck. The soggy blobs did the trick, no damage at all.

 

 

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I default to Kurt for all soldering questions.  However, I can say that I've been resistance soldering for a while, specifically on chains, chain plates and other similar items.  I am working in 1:96 so these parts are extremely small.  With resistance soldering, I'm able to make a very convincing chain plate, soldering while a walnut deadeye is already installed.  The deadeye doesn't get charred at all.  I use "Cold Heat".  It uses four AA batteries.  I use Tix or Stay bright with paste flux.  I cut off small slivers of solder and use the flux to hold it in place.  Cold Heat used to be sold by Radio-Shack.  According to their website, ColdHeat.com, it is also sold at Home Depot and Fry's Electronics.  With resistance soldering, it is very important that the parts contact each other.  This is the most difficult part of the operation for me.

 

All the best,

 

Tom

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