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Hi . I have used Bentley Microstation and Autocad professionally for the last 25 years. Now I'm not working on contract anymore, I don't have access to those programs, so I am looking at less expensive options for lofting. Can an experienced  Fusion 360 user let me know if F360 handles Béziers curves adequately, and is it necessary to save your work after each session, or is there an auto save facility? As I need to update my computer, any minimum spec info would also be helpful.Thanks Williamo

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I have recently been trying some 3D modelling using Blender.  I have had some decent success, but wonder how much better other tools might be.  For hull modelling, the main challenge is fitting a surface to the various curves that the plans describe.  Can Fusion 360 (or any other software, for that matter) do this, taking into account curves in multiple directions?

 

In Blender, it's possible to create a surface from multiple curves, as long as every curve has the same number of control points.  However, the connections between the curves are more or less straight.  There is no way to use another set of curves, orthogonal to the first set, to "guide" the shape of the surface between.  I don't know if that's just a limitation of Blender, or something no software can do.

 

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13 hours ago, SardonicMeow said:

I have recently been trying some 3D modelling using Blender.  I have had some decent success, but wonder how much better other tools might be.  For hull modelling, the main challenge is fitting a surface to the various curves that the plans describe.  Can Fusion 360 (or any other software, for that matter) do this, taking into account curves in multiple directions?

 

In Blender, it's possible to create a surface from multiple curves, as long as every curve has the same number of control points.  However, the connections between the curves are more or less straight.  There is no way to use another set of curves, orthogonal to the first set, to "guide" the shape of the surface between.  I don't know if that's just a limitation of Blender, or something no software can do.

 

I have similar questions, and am currently evaluating F360 from the link kindly provided by Nirvana. Handling Bézier curves,thickening surfaces, defining volumes and transition to G code for CNC work are all important for me. I also need to understand minimum hardware spec requirements, as I am up for a new system.

Watch this space.

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my 2 cents:

 

I have used bezier curves extensively during my stint with the program a couple of years back. what I hated a lot, there was no way to push and pull handles on control points separately - i.e. in Fusion if you pull on one handle, the opposite one extends equally. you could break handles and move them separately but that would create a break in the curve and hard corners. for example, Blender has excellent curves support, you can do virtually whatever you like with them. Solidworks also allows for independent handle control (extending) without breaking the curve. having the ability to change curvature by pulling handle only on one side of the control point is a great feature which wasn't present at the time back then. that was my major frustration source with the software.

 

other than that, it handles 3d curves well, I can't remember about auto save feature, but the save file stays in the cloud linked to your account, so you can continue to work on another device. lofting along the curve between various profiles was also doing a great job, with or without guide curves. I remember I liked the feature more than in Solidworks. one more annoying thing was, the software would update very frequently and it would become very sluggish while doing it. 

 

my rig: Intel Core i7 4770K, GPU GTX770 2GB Ram, 24GB sysetm RAM was handling it pretty well. it did stutter a bit if I had more than 50 curve points, and was

lofting the whole curve in one go. breaking the loft process in more pieces helped...

 

cheers!!

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I have recently become a F360 disciple. I am new to CAD but I am very impressed with Fusion. I am having way too much fun. It is a professional grade S/W and it is free. It supports 3D as well as 2D drawings. It also does simulations and animation. I doubt you will find something your heart desires that it cannot do. The support is outstanding. There is a regular Video every week from Autodesk which you can join live. and after the session it is posted to YouTube.

Edited by fnkershner
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If you take a look here:

 

https://knowledge.autodesk.com/support/fusion-360/troubleshooting/caas/sfdcarticles/sfdcarticles/How-to-activate-start-up-or-educational-licensing-for-Fusion-360.html

 

Quote
  • The free Start-Up/ Enthusiast licenses allow you to access Fusion 360 with a yearly subscription after the trial period has ended. You can use this license if you are a small business making less than $100,000 per year (or equivalent), or if you're a hobbyist using Fusion 360 for non-commercial purposes.

 

Richard.

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It is a powerful program. And as such there is much to learn. But if you take it in bite size pieces I think you will find it rewarding. And yes it took me much longer to learn and I am still learning than TinkerCAD. But you can do so much more. I suggest you install and when you want a break from your latest modeling project you watch video on YouTube. I have a dual monitor on my desktop PC. I run the video on one monitor and Fusion on the other. I frequently stop the video and repeat what is being displayed on Fusion. I have found this very instructive.

 

When you are ready to get serious about the basics I strongly suggest a class - https://www.udemy.com/designing-for-3d-printing-with-fusion-360/

This class only costs $14.00 and it is 4 hours long. It Starts with the assumption that you have never used CAD. It show you how to 3D print several basic items. each item has been chosen to teach you something new about Fusion. It also builds confidence. For $14 it is hard to go wrong. One of the lessons teach you how to install Fusion for free. Enjoy! :D

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  • 1 month later...
  • 2 weeks later...

I use Onshape exclusively for my ship design and woodshop projects. There are tons of tutorials to get you started. If you are already familiar with 3D modeling you'll pick up on things pretty quickly if not the tutorials are very good. There is no software to download. You can signup for a free account or paid subscription.  I've inserts a few screen shots. Hope this helps.post-306-0-59647000-1442787333_thumb.jpg post-306-0-85680800-1442787344_thumb.jpgpost-306-0-25934500-1442787326_thumb.jpg

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  • 4 weeks later...

So I took the Fusion 360 challenge.  Having used Turbocad for years, I found F360 to be fairly straight forward.  The hardest part is finding the tool you want and learning the peculiarities of the program.  I have done some work in Onshape and found it comparable.  It seems to me that anyone willing to put in a bit of time, willing to look at training videos and willing to persevere can learn both F360 and Onshape in a reasonably short time frame.  The work flow details differ, but not so much as to make difficult the adapting previous of methods to each program.

 

Both Onshape and F360 are free cloud based programs.  Onshape's free version is fully functional but limits the number of files one can store to 10.  Fusion 360 offers the fully functional version for free to hobbyists.  You do have to sign up and indicate that you are either a hobbyist or a start up business.  The guidelines for signing up are very clear.  

 

I choose to model a 29' Launch in TC and F360 just to compare the two.  I was learning F360 from scratch and have done a fair amount or work in TC.  The results are appended.  Do not get too excited about comparing the renderings since my skills in rendering are quite crude.  The point is that each program produces an interesting model.  Perhaps I will test out converting the models to 2D drawings at some future date.  I should mention that launches were still whole moulded, so there was very little employment of Beziers in these models.

 

This the the Launch from Fusion 360:

 

5b2926d700e92_Fusion360Launch(2).thumb.jpg.64c0a56694e6882a8329792ddd0def12.jpg

5b2926ff874fd_Fusion360Launch(3).thumb.jpg.950a0282bfbb38a9816352e2f2203f14.jpg5b292717e1580_Fusion360Launch(4).thumb.jpg.ca5a6bcf577238a5b9ea36d005676c34.jpg

And the same plan in Turbocad v. 19:

 

5b292748af97e_TC19Launch(2).thumb.jpg.2326065d486fbbc7097c7ca8c1bb3a67.jpg

5b2927629d1fd_TC19Launch(3a).thumb.jpg.4d2d7e5114731cfd6a8cc444111bd51a.jpg5b29277216470_TC19Launch(4a).thumb.jpg.f95f854d09f85523541b1a9f08b52a41.jpg

 

Wayne

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Onshape limits you to 10 private files. If you make your files public you have 5 gb of storage. I like your launch Wayne, I think Fusion 360 has better rendering than the Turbo cad. I also think you have a good definition of whole molding that is very few Bezier curves.

Edited by Don9of11
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  • 4 weeks later...

Hi.

Wow Wayne... That is impressive.

I have only just got into Fusion360 this week.

Found that I can import my Adobe illustrator files and Use a CNC router to cut the profiles. No I have not got my CNC router yet.. Making sure I can use the tools before forking out the cash.

 

Also found a couple of videos that are right for MSW.

Part one.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ixGnJjNPj18

Part two.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9zCteq0qkZM

 

Regards Antony.

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  • 4 months later...

I posted this on my own post:

 

Downloaded Fusion 360 and was given a 3 year Educational licence, as well, I am receiving a 100 days of lessons from them.

I have started with the lessons and will keep people informed of the progress. It must be borne in mind that I am not a CAD user, so this is my first foray into something new and will giver it my all to learn.

 

Update on the Training so far: I have completed the introduction and am busy with the 3D introduction.  The lessons are video and includes the lesson plans with drawings. There is one aspect that would help use all (if F360 is used) is the Fusion Team. Example: If all the knowledgeable and professional builders (EdT, Montanes, to name but a few) use F360 and are on the Fusion Team, we that are still on a learning curve can send our CAD drawings to them for appraisal and assistance where we go wrong.

 

I also downloaded the Lesson Plans that the provide, Some of the plans are 132 pages.

 

Will continue posting on this link.

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I just came across this thread while posting another topic in this area. After struggling with some of the idiosyncrasies of TurboCad for Mac, I am intrigued by the videos for Fusion 360 a number of you have pointed to. But I don't find on the Autodesk website how much the subscription is after the free trial period, for hobby use. Has anyone subscribed to this, and can you tell me how much it costs you?

 

Mark

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