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Does color of gun carriages have to match that of the


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Not sure if this is the right section to post this, but here goes.  I am trying to finalize the color scheme on my Euromodel La Renommee build.  I'm trying to avoid paint where possible, and right now I'm using walnut and cherry for dark and light brown, and will use black/ebony stains for black.  I haven't fully decided what to do with the ornamentation, but I might break down and use gold with various washes.

 

I'm considering whether to add other colors to the build.   I have a little redheart that I could use for a touch of color.  I could use it for a stripe on the upper outer hull, inner bulwarks on the main deck, and possibly the colors for the cabin walls under the quarterdeck.  I wouldn't want to use a lot of red though, so, for example, would not make the bitts, capstan, other deck items, and gun carriages out of redheart.  The ship has 40 guns, so 40 gun carriages is a lot of redheart.  Then again, the kit included carriages are overscale and need a bit of work to reduce their dimensions - it can be done, but probably the same amount of work in the end as it is to just build new carriages in redheart.

 

That leads me to a couple of questions:

 

1.  If the inner bulwarks are red, would it look odd if the gun carriages are in brown?  Do the carriages have to match the inner bulwarks?

 

2.  If the inner bulwarks on the main deck level (which would be visible) are red, would the bulwarks on lower deck levels also be in red?  The reason I ask is that it would be a bit of work (and I probably don't have enough redheart) to line the gunport sills, inside face of the gunport lids, and inner bulwarks on the gun deck in red.  

 

Typing this out, I'm wondering if I should drop the idea of adding redheart at all and just keep the model in brown/black/gold.  But, in case I change my mind and want a little color, I just want to make sure that I understand the paint schemes on ships of the period so I end up with something that looks good aesthetically as well as is generally historically accurate.  For what it's worth, I think the kit actually represents a Swedish ship, and I can't find much out there on color schemes except for some Gota Lejon (and the models and pictures I've seen have used various color schemes). 

 

Thanks in advance!

Edited by Landlubber Mike
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Hi Mike, 

I don't know for your particular ship, but typically the if one gun deck is red, the bulwarks on all gun decks are red.  Of course there are always exceptions. The orlop is sometimes red or white, depending upon the ship (I think that I've seen more with white than red).  I guess it is because there is less blood being splashed on the bulwarks on the orlop deck?

good luck

Marc

Edited by keelhauled
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The red wasn't picked to hide the blood which is a myth.  The red (as well as white) was cheap and frequently re-applied.   The gundeck on French ships could be either red or white depending on level.  Gun carriages most usually were red but for modeling... wood works well.   The French model builders usually don't use paint at all but "paint with wood" such that the carriages and bulwarks on the gundeck would most likely be Swiss pear.   

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Thanks guys this is all very helpful information.  Still not sure about adding “colors” to the build.  I’m already adding blues, reds and whites to my Pegasus build, and not sure I want to take a similar approach here.  There is a simple aesthetic elegance of working in as few colors as possible, as seen in the work by the European masters.

 

For now, I think I’ll go with brown for the gun deck bulwarks and port sills - that will make things much easier. I can decide later as I move up to the main deck whether to add redheart or not.

 

 

 

Edited by Landlubber Mike
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The fundamental question is always, whether you go for an 'artisanal' look, or a 'realistic' one. In the former case you would have all artisanal freedom you like and can choose what pleases you aesthetically. In the latter case, you would need to try to confirm through research what might have been used on the prototype.

 

I am inclined to think that white-wash was quite prevalent on lower decks, because it makes the cramped space look more airy and reflects the little available light better (as already mentioned above). In addition, it has some bactericide and fungicide effects due to its high pH-value (which was not know scientifically, of course, at the time, but practical experience showed that less nasty, smelly things were growing in nooks and corners).

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Thank you!  It’s been harder to find research in Swedish warships than one might think.  I suppose I could try writing the museum in Stockholm but I think I’ll just go with the more simple color scheme.

 

Thanks again for the info!  I always learn so much on here, no matter what the question.  

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