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Wasa by fmodajr - FINISHED - Corel - 1:75

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Frank, great shop. The combination of air filtration and vacuum shows forethought to personal safety and comfort. Question, where does the lathe reside?

 

Beautiful work Frank.

 

Roger

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Frank, great shop. The combination of air filtration and vacuum shows forethought to personal safety and comfort. Question, where does the lathe reside?

 

Beautiful work Frank.

 

Roger

Hi Roger,

 

Thanks for your comments.

I currently do not have a lathe. That will be my next purchase in 2015!

In the meantime, I have been using my drill press for tapering my yards and for other items by modifying the table to support one end of the dowel, while using the drill chuck to hold the other end.

Any recommendations for a quality miniature lathe would be greatly appreciated. ( the scale models I like to work on are mostly 1:64 or 1:75)

 

Thanks,

Frank

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Hi Frank, your question on lathes is easily asked, but difficult to answer.

 

It depends on the type of work you intend to do.  If the primary need is to taper spars, then you already have the DP and the technique, so you do not need a lathe for these.  If you intend to cut metal, such as cannons, bushes, mandrels, and other parts for engines or iron work, then a Sherline or Taig will do well.   The older Unimats (I think the /db models) are good, and available on ebay.  Do not get the newer ones as they have too much plastic and, I am advised, do not hold the tolerances very well.  I had the older Unimat for many years but sold it because I

 

One thing to keep in mind: no matter how big the machine, it seems to always be too small for some jobs.   So we make do, we improvise, hire out. 

 

Good luck, and above all, have fun.                                                           Duff

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Thanks for the input Duff,

 

I have been looking at the Sherline lathes. They seem to have a lot of accessories that make the lathe very usable. I will check out the older Unimats also! (It all does get expensive!)

 

I'll probably have more questions to ask as I get closer to a purchase decision.

 

Thanks,

Frank

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Hi Frank,

 

I remember going to see the remains of the Wasa and trying to think just how great it must have been when she was launched, and just before the end of her fateful maiden voyage. You've created a beautiful image of what she must have been like. Well done.

 

Julian 

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Hi Frank, sorry for the delay (I seem to work way too much). Regarding a lathe I picked the Rikon model 70-100 with a Nova Midi chuck. It runs very smooth at all speeds and is equipped with an indexing wheel (handy when you need to mill flats on your work) all disclaimers implied.

I have recently seen advertised a "drill press lathe conversion" available from Woodstock International (#D4088) @ $30.36 US no idea if it works at our scale or even at all.

However you have accomplished your great work I seen no reason for change - keep doing what your doing the way you are doing it.

Friendly,

Roger

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Hi Frank,

 

I remember going to see the remains of the Wasa and trying to think just how great it must have been when she was launched, and just before the end of her fateful maiden voyage. You've created a beautiful image of what she must have been like. Well done.

 

Julian 

Hi Julian,

 

Thank you for your kind remarks!

And thanks for visiting my log. It is appreciated!

 

Hopefully, I will have some updated pictures posted next week.

 

Frank

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Hi Roger,

 

Thanks for you input. Quick question: Is the Rikon indexing wheel for milling flats accurate, useful, easy to use, worth it?

 

Thanks,

 

Frank

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Good evening Frank,

Personally, yes to all. When you have time please check this model out on the web, it's used by amateur's and pros alike.

Please keep the Wasa "lessons" coming.

Friendly,

Roger

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Hi,

 

I continued by working on the figurines on both side of the ship.

 

I had to thin down the figurines, especially the large figures near the bow, in order to get them to fit above the gun ports. Then, as usual, I gold leafed them before mounting.

post-951-0-29626100-1410288948_thumb.jpg

 

Large figurines (tight fit) on starboard and port sides.

post-951-0-75282100-1410288961_thumb.jpg

post-951-0-36391900-1410288972_thumb.jpg

 

I had to grind off some of the nails that were in the way for the smaller figurines.

Also, I inserted some wood shims to help support them.

I left some space below the top shim so that rigging line can pass thru this space later on.

post-951-0-19436500-1410288984_thumb.jpg

 

Test fit of rigging line to make sure there were no obstructions

post-951-0-11001700-1410288994_thumb.jpg

 

Installed figurines on port and starboard side

post-951-0-15498100-1410289006_thumb.jpg

post-951-0-26126700-1410289016_thumb.jpg

 

Added the chains to the rudder at this time. I blackened them before installation

post-951-0-84432300-1410321434_thumb.jpg

 

Frank

 

Edited by fmodajr

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Started working on the false cannon.

 

Painted them with a diluted black to match the deck cannon.

Then I sprayed on a coat of "Dull Cote" for handling.

post-951-0-10477200-1410290676_thumb.jpg

 

Now installing the false cannon on the starboard side.

Previously, early in the build I milled a slot in the cannon housing and installed the false carriages.

Now, I just add some glue, slide in the cannon and lower onto the carriages.

Here are some pictures of the first side.

post-951-0-02587500-1410290687_thumb.jpg

post-951-0-66971600-1410290695_thumb.jpg

post-951-0-12775100-1410290705_thumb.jpg

post-951-0-42552800-1410290713_thumb.jpg

post-951-0-88247700-1410290720_thumb.jpg

post-951-0-32587000-1410290729_thumb.jpg

 

Now onto the port side.

Next up, I will start working on the anchor installation.

 

Thanks,

Frank

 

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I now added the safety lines to the rudder per Landstom's book. According to Landstrom, the lines were used to "lift the rudder into place and as a means of preventing it from floating away if its fittings suffered damage." Also, "the lines could be used if need be to maneuver the rudder."

 

View from starboard and port.

post-951-0-63200000-1410321988_thumb.jpg

post-951-0-86502500-1410321997_thumb.jpg

 

Thanks,

 

Frank

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Hi Janos,

 

Thanks for visiting!

To answer some of your questions about the leafing:

1) the gold leaf is so thin that if you breath on it, you can blow the sheet away! So, with regards to detail being lost on a carving, I don't think this will happen. I believe it goes on even thinner than a coat of paint and if you use a woman's makeup blush brush, you will be able to get the leaf into all the nooks and crannies and in my opinion, bring out even more detail.

2) I first used the gold leaf process back in 2008 on my "Italian Sciabecco" build. So it has been on for about 7 years. I keep the ship in a case for dust protection etc., so I removed the case today to take a look at the leaf. It shows no sign of deterioration, no looseness, and because it is actual 24 carrot gold, the "shininess" is unchanged.

The key to the whole process is the seizing glue that is put on first. It has to be given a chance to dry to a tacky feel (about 2 hours) before applying the gold. 

Here are some pictures of the gold leaf on the Sciabecco from 2007 - 2008.

post-951-0-30463900-1410538981_thumb.jpg

post-951-0-70338300-1410538988_thumb.jpg

post-951-0-93224200-1410538993_thumb.jpg

 

3) I did not apply any lacquer or other sealer to the gold.

4) I order my leaf from "Sepp Leaf Products" in New York. If you view their catalog, you will see many different types of gold leaf and you can decide on how bright or dull you want the leaf to look on your ship.

 

I hope this helps,

 

Frank

 

 

 

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Hello Frank, Very nice neat workmanship,you can be proud of a beautifully built model.Edwin

Hi Edwin,

 

Thanks for your kind comments,

 

Frank

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I started working on my anchors for the ship.

(Sorry for the quality of some of the pictures. I was never good at photography!!)

 

The first thing I did was remake the anchor stocks. I did not like the ones that came with the kit. I remade them using walnut.

post-951-0-37842400-1411144530_thumb.jpg

 

Drilled some small holes for the tree nails (Used the old anchor stocks for this illustration)

post-951-0-33032400-1411144540_thumb.jpg

 

Using my tree nail tool, I cut some square stock of lighter wood and ran it thru the tool to make it round.

post-951-0-23902300-1411144550_thumb.jpg

 

Glued and press fit into the anchor stock (Used the old anchor stocks for this illustration)

post-951-0-79196700-1411144559_thumb.jpg

 

Sanded down flush on walnut stocks

post-951-0-81108400-1411144569_thumb.jpg

 

Added the blackened nails to each side

post-951-0-28148200-1411144590_thumb.jpg

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Using dark brown rigging line, I wrapped the 2 large eyes for the anchors

post-951-0-28828400-1411144978_thumb.jpg

 

Painted the anchors and assembled the stocks

post-951-0-77169200-1411144990_thumb.jpg

 

Rigged the large anchor line and attached to the large eyes.

post-951-0-70313400-1411144999_thumb.jpg

 

Took the blocks and added the hooks and wrapped with darkened thin metal straps

post-951-0-57837300-1411145009_thumb.jpg

 

Added wrapped line to only one of the anchors. This is for the starboard side anchor, which I will show being hoisted up with davit. (I will have the port anchor shown in a stored position)

post-951-0-21043600-1411145018_thumb.jpg

 

Rigged a double block to the starboard davit

post-951-0-14013700-1411145028_thumb.jpg

 

I will mount the anchors soon and try to have an update early next week

 

Thanks,

Frank

 

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I LOVE the work you do on the anchors - and it is yet the stock we see... What else will you do with the anchor itself :)

 

I think I will improve the anchors with my Royal Caroline too... They look so "normal" when they come out of the box. Thx for the inspiration.

 

Cheerio

 

Max

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Hi Max,

 

Thanks for the comments!

 

I have been trying to follow some of the illustrations from Landstron's book. Who knows how accurate things are! :)

 

Thanks

Frank

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Finishing up the anchors!

 

So, working on the starboard side, trying to show the anchor being raised.

 

During a test fit of the anchor, I noticed that the assembly would be swinging loosely when finished, so I had to think of a way to protect and secure it without being noticed.

So I drilled and pinned the backside of the stock and drilled a corresponding hole on the side of the ship.

post-951-0-20958800-1411500608_thumb.jpg

 

Now I pressed and glued the pin and stock into the side of the ship, holding the anchor assembly firm, without being noticeable.

post-951-0-22829000-1411500618_thumb.jpg

 

Rigged the block and anchor to the bow davit

post-951-0-94209500-1411500630_thumb.jpg

 

Rigged the other end of the anchor to the removable davit.

post-951-0-72272400-1411500640_thumb.jpg

post-951-0-03331000-1411500653_thumb.jpg

 

Finished the large anchor cable

post-951-0-28873700-1411500663_thumb.jpg

 

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Working on the port side, trying to show the anchor in a somewhat stored position.

 

Finished rigging the bow davit to the anchor ring and added support lines to the middle and end of the anchor.

post-951-0-67187600-1411501323_thumb.jpg

 

View of finished port side

post-951-0-89838800-1411501332_thumb.jpg

post-951-0-32417700-1411501344_thumb.jpg

 

Coiled ropes from the bow davits terminal end

post-951-0-70443700-1411501354_thumb.jpg

post-951-0-69147100-1411501377_thumb.jpg

 

Coiled line from the starboard removable davit. 

post-951-0-31605700-1411501368_thumb.jpg

 

Now onto the large pulleys above the mizzen mast  channels!

 

Thanks,

Frank

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I made the 2 pulleys, that sit above the mizzen mast channels, out of walnut. I made the sheaves out of a dowel of wood and grooved the outside diameter.

post-951-0-21676300-1411785386_thumb.jpg

 

Pulley with sheaves pinned in place

post-951-0-76405000-1411785395_thumb.jpg

post-951-0-59509600-1411785405_thumb.jpg

 

Fitted on Port Side

post-951-0-62600900-1411785417_thumb.jpg

 

Fitted on Starboard side

post-951-0-27887600-1411785429_thumb.jpg

 

Drilled hole on both side, where the rigging from the pulleys will enter the ship side

post-951-0-42680500-1411785452_thumb.jpg

 

Pulley and hole

post-951-0-64835900-1411785440_thumb.jpg

 

So, after viewing Michael's (md1400cs) fine log and the discussions about removing the pin rails, (which apparently don't belong), I now have to figure out a way to remove them without damaging the ship or the cannon! Yikes, Will not be fun!

post-951-0-67569500-1411785533_thumb.jpg

 

Thanks,

Frank

 

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Hi Everyone,

 

Thanks for all the likes! It is appreciated!

 

I will need to take a break from my ship build, for about 2 weeks, in order to finish another project.

 

In the meantime, I was wondering if anyone can assist me with some input on the topic of the decorative railing for the Vasa.

If I wait to install the delicate railing after the rigging of the ship, should I still pre-plan, drill and cutout where the railing posts are supposed to go? I still have to drill the holes on the lower main railings for the belaying pins and I don't want to mistakenly drill a belaying pin hole where the delicate upper railing posts should be. Also, if I wait to do everything after the rigging, how will I get around the rigging to drill and square up the holes for the posts on the lower railing?

Am I over thinking this?  :) 

 

Thanks in advance for any help or advice,

Frank

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Frank -

I haven`t got that far on mine yet but I would definitely drill the holes for the railing posts before rigging. I don`t see any way you could drill them properly with the shrouds in the way. On my Sergal build I installed the railings before any rigging but at 1/60 scale they are a bit stronger. i  was careful working around them & managed to not break any :). I just thought it would be too fiddly to try and fit the railings to the posts with the shrouds in the way. Just my thoughts.

 

/Mark

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Hi Mark,

 

Thats for your input. I think that I will make all the railing parts now, drill the slots in the lower rails, then test fit everything to be sure. 

Then put everything aside for later installation!

 

Frank

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