Jump to content

Welcome to Model Ship World
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

Triton cross section by Anguirel -1:48


  • Please log in to reply
45 replies to this topic

#41
AnobiumPunctatum

AnobiumPunctatum
  • Members
  • 858 posts
  • LocationDuisburg, Germany

Anguriel,

 

I will check it this evening.


  • mtaylor and Canute like this

Regards Christian
 

In the shipyard: HM Sloop Fly, 1776 - Scale 1/32;

On the drawing board: Naval Cutter Rattlesnake, 1777 - Scale 1/32


#42
AnobiumPunctatum

AnobiumPunctatum
  • Members
  • 858 posts
  • LocationDuisburg, Germany

Anguriel,

 

 I checked the values. They are correct. I've had a look to my drawing project. At cutters the first futtock is also wider than the floor timber.

As far as I remember the position of the gun ports  of the group build matchs the original drawing.


  • mtaylor and Canute like this

Regards Christian
 

In the shipyard: HM Sloop Fly, 1776 - Scale 1/32;

On the drawing board: Naval Cutter Rattlesnake, 1777 - Scale 1/32


#43
Anguirel

Anguirel
  • Members
  • 26 posts
Hi Christian,

Thanks for the info. It's back to the drawing board, from the values you sent all the frames are thicker then the ones on the frorun planes so I can't use the ones I had already cut.
  • mtaylor and Canute like this

#44
AnobiumPunctatum

AnobiumPunctatum
  • Members
  • 858 posts
  • LocationDuisburg, Germany

Anguriel,

 

the thickness of the regular frames is not that important in 1/48 (1'' is 0.5mm in that scale). If you take the medium thickness and make all frames the same it's absolut ok. I think the typical position of the single and double frames and the special frames at midship are typical for an English ship and special for your choosen pattern.

 

But if you like the fun to build it more close to the original ship, do it the more complicated way.

 

I wouldn't you black paper for the frames. The joint is not stable enough. There exist a one layer pulp, which you will find in a hobby store. If you use this the joint is much better.

Black paper should show the caulking. As far as I know there is now caulking between the tmibers of a frame. If you want to higlight the joints, it is better to use brown color which is a little darker than the used timber, Have a look on page 4 in my build log.


  • mtaylor, tkay11, GabeK and 1 other like this

Regards Christian
 

In the shipyard: HM Sloop Fly, 1776 - Scale 1/32;

On the drawing board: Naval Cutter Rattlesnake, 1777 - Scale 1/32


#45
GabeK

GabeK
  • Members
  • 202 posts
  • LocationWinnipeg, Canada

I agree with Christian that there wouldn't be caulk between the frame timbers.  Caulk was to prevent water from entering the hull - so it would only be on the deck and hull planking.  (I read somewhere that when a new ship was launched, the head caulker would have to drink all the water that came into the hull! :o )

 

I wouldn't worry about remaking your frames - they look excellent.  The paper is showing off your excellent construction of the frames!  

 

Clear skies,

Gabe


  • mtaylor and Canute like this

Current builds:
Harvey, Baltimore Clipper - Artesania Latina
HMS Triton Cross Section, 18th Century Frigate - online scratch build
Santa Maria, Caravel - Artesania Latina

Completed:
Swift - Artesania Latina --- Build log --- Gallery

Skeeter, Ship-in-Bottle - Ships a Sailin' kit --- Build log


#46
Anguirel

Anguirel
  • Members
  • 26 posts
Hi

Attached File  IMG_3779.JPG   187.15KB   0 downloads

This was waiting for me when I arrived home yesterday, finally I will be able o keep things squared.

As for the black paper on the frames, the double frames they are sturdy enough ( if the one I built can be used as an example) the simple ones might be a ploblem. I used the paper because I read somewhere that they used tar or pitch on the frame joints, but now I can't find it, will have to go through the books again...
  • Chuck, Ryland Craze, Pete38 and 5 others like this




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Welcome GUEST to the Model Ship World Community.
Please LOGIN or REGISTER to use all of our feautures.