Jump to content

Hr.Ms. Evertsen 1894 by amateur - Answer - 1:200 - card - protected cruiser


Recommended Posts

Today I received a new modelkit, a paper one, by the Polish firm Answer.

It is a paper model ofa Dutch protected cruiser from 1894, named Evertsen. I checked the internet, and I can notfind any completed models. 

 

I can't promise that I start soon with the build, as I recently moved, have a garden to do, still have a paid job, and a couple of models in various stages of completion. But who knows.....

 

I can't figure out why Answer chose this protected cruiser, there were more that were larger, more elegant, and were more famous (check protected cruiser Gelderland, that was the most famous of all). Evertsen had around 20 years of coastal duty, but never fired a gun 'for real', and ended on the breakers yard just before the first wold war.

 

secondly, I van't figure out why Answer chose this livery: almost all Dutch ships of that era had three colourscheme's over their life span. Blach hull, white hull, yellowfunnels, both with gilded scrollwork onbow and stern, and finally a dull light gray, that was used for hull, superstructure and scrollwork. Guess what colourscheme Answer used. Yep, you guessed it :)

 

to get some idea on my task ahead, some pics of the model, which came together with lasercutted frames, some PE-details, and a couple of brass guns.

6B79F587-80E6-4ABE-97B2-B66E83BD47E1.JPG

0F12A84F-034C-4BB3-8175-C36315BF5C3A.JPG

687582D1-CCE1-4A5D-A3BE-636803B1CC1F.JPG

FC51DCDC-B4FD-44E4-B27E-B3CE3A6FF6A3.JPG

AFB9135A-FD92-458A-808A-2C61E94881E6.JPG

FBC9A6A1-1776-4075-B354-257B10453C3A.JPG

Edited by amateur
Link to comment
Share on other sites

To give you some idea on the original, a couple of pics, there isn't many more, as the ship led a rather quiet, not to say dull life....

 

the pic with the three white ships is taken in Amsterdam, and Evertsen is the middle one. The ships had higher masts in this pic, as they were wired for radio-receiving equipment that was used for communication with the far east.IMG_0287.JPG.48d670bac37d8c1b575d052049e1f7e9.JPG

IMG_0284.JPG

IMG_0285.JPG

IMG_0286.JPG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But I did something I perhaps shouldn't have done: As I was a bit interested in the size of the model, I put together the laser-cut framing. (still without glue). And What I "feared" is true: 1:200 in paper is far, far smaller than in wood scale 1:100 :)

 

The midd-frame is in tow parts, as are the "false decks' to get the frames in the correct position.

 

IMG_2510.thumb.JPG.0d1a4c1f817cb7cc667cf4b95507c0ee.JPG

IMG_2512.thumb.JPG.58700840a67c731fb9f0a7315794cef5.JPG

 

I guess that this is where this log stops now, I will try to find some time to start on V108, and open a log for that one.

 

I glued the frame-parts to a piece of cardboard, which - as expected - went 'non-flat' in all posiible directions at once (and yes, this pic was taken after the piece of cardboard rested under a couple of heavy books overnight :) )

IMG_2509.thumb.JPG.c4ca2d3eddacb855efdc256dea060dd1.JPG

To be continued (some time in the future)

 

Jan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

35 minutes ago, amateur said:

What I "feared" is true: 1:200 in paper is far, far smaller than in wood scale 1:100

Yep, exactly half the size, and not just in wood :D.

 

No reason to panic just yet Jan ;). First off - the card you used looks to be a rather nasty one. It obviously has a "grain", and therefore will bend much more readily in one direction than the other. Perhaps gluing the parts at 90 degrees may be an easy fix. Otherwise I suggest you invest in a couple of sheets of good quality card and start over.

 

Second - cut out the whole area to be laminated from the full sheet of card, dampen it SLIGHTLY and leave under flat weights until you are ready to start cutting. Can't hurt to try it :).

 

:cheers:  Danny

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, and yes, 1:200 is half the size of 1:100, I know, but still, seeing the size of the model in your hand make you realize that it is really small :) (although, with 42 centimeters, it is still a model of some size)

 

I started cutting the V108 bottom, and the positve news was that the card could be bent flat quite easily when the parts were cut out. The problem is that in this thickness (just under 1mm) my artshop only had this rather coarse greyboard. The nice ones start at thickness of around 1.5 mm, which is too thick for this model. 

Dutch shops in my area tend to have large amounts of rather glossy coloured thin cardboards, but not so much in the thicker stuff, also the assortment of printable thick paper is small: 80, 120 and 160 grams. 160 grams is around .25 mm thick. For the larger parts, I would have liked paper of around 200 grams, but that was only available in postcard-size. 

 

Jan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good news about the card being able to be flattened :). If you want to get some good card of the right sizes try buying some from GPM in Poland - it's specially made for card models, great quality, and comes in various sizes. I suggest you buy a lot more than you need, and maybe also some other accessories (PE etc) to make the postage worthwhile.

 

:cheers:  Danny

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, amateur said:

Frames look a bit small to use as a basis for gluing the skin on.

That's usually a problem Jan. I glue a bit of extra card each side of the frames to give some more gluing surface. I've seen others glue a strip of thin card onto the edge of each frame, but you would have to trim or sand the frames down the thickness of the extra card otherwise the skins won't fit properly - there's usually no margin for error.

 

I'd also suggest gluing at least one extra piece longitudinally between the frames to avoid "squashing" the skins when fitting them. There is no need to glue the skins to the extra bracing, it's just a safety measure.

 

:cheers:  Danny

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, additional skin support is an option.

Although the frames are reasonably close to each other, it might be worthwhie to do. My (theoretical till now) problem is that the hull below the waterline follows some nicely curved lines, resulting in both convex and concave surfaces. I have some difficulty to imagine how the outside of the braces should be: most importantly: I can imagine the curved lines, but am not sure whether or not I will be able to get the paper follow that line, or that the paper will ly flat between the frames.

 

Jan

Edited by amateur
getting rid of some awfull typo's :)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...