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SMS Seydlitz by Canute, Cog and RGL (anyone can join) - Hobbyboss - 1/350

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So jealous. I’ve been out on the water coaching kids sport since 6am, quick nap then off to a beer festival all afternoon. 

 

If if I had the drilling template I could get a lot done even without the upgrade!!!!! 

 

If you look look closely at the original photos there are sheeves above each torpedo net boom that run a line through two blocks on each boom. 

 

There are multiple blocks on the forward part of the hull that lines run through to pull out the booms, those lines then run up the the deck via sheeves that would then run to winches to pull them out. 

 

Then there are brailing davits along the deck that run out to the nets to pull them up. I’ve just about got my head around them and will do up a diagram later. 

DE69B37B-42A6-4D20-B90B-67A8A83214BC.jpeg

0AA0FD9E-D797-4492-8064-D2D06E00151D.jpeg

C3A2E116-2E4B-4F98-8845-2899BDB741CF.png

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46 minutes ago, RGL said:

Absolutely. It’ll be a few months worth of Northern Europe picking on the Southern Hemisphere, he won’t pick on the yanks as they’re too big.

You are so wrong about that mate ... I pick on whom ever I want to. However, you are just such a lovely victim ... you really play the part ...

 

Osmosis,

why don't you join in the build fun ...? Get yerself a kit, and the after market stuff and dive right in ...

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1 minute ago, Osmosis said:

Oh, I am not ready for that yet. But thank you for the warm welcome.

 

 

 

Nobody ever is ... I just jumped in meself with the Vendetta  build log. It's a lot easier building together

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Denis, I do. Just waited for the "bling" to show up. Now the fun begins. Making holes in the hull for various and sundry purposes. Hobbyboss didn't get every nuance of this battlecruiser. Some will be up to our interpretation of available photos. Greg has been a hero digging up shots.

 

Art, Carl enjoys spreading his "talents" around, whether it's an Aussie or a Yank. We're all targets. You could join Jack12377 with a build of a Fletcher class DD. Or try a sub. The boat is usually pretty basic, but you will learn some new painting skills.

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6 minutes ago, Canute said:

You could join Jack12377 with a build of a Fletcher class DD

It's JACK12477 --- bit off on the id, Ken. 

 

The PE brass is proving to be a giant challenge.  Firstly, in identifying the appropriate piece(s) and then in bending them. Even with magnification it ain't easy.

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I have found most of my photos on Facebook, posted on open source groups about the Kaisers navy. These shots are particularly clear and important in getting you head around the rigging required for the Torpedo net booms. The firs is of a sister ship but shows the lines well. as there are two anchors on the port side the sheeves and blocks run between them. The aftermarket also includes he doors (folding down in shot one) nea the bow with more cannons. The kit makes no reference to this.

A.jpg

B.jpg

C.jpg

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Thanks but I prefer cleaning up saw dust over plastic curly wurlies. But I am still amazed to see the level of detail in these builds.

 

And as for being a "target" when I said "warm" welcome I meant warm it was about 80 degrees in Florida today I wonder what the temp was in Gelderland.

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My dreadnoughts rigging was complex but I had reference to the AOTS, so I have to figure it out. I expect the nets were pulled out via the capstans using these lines forward. The references say the nets were dropped straight off the shelves into the water an unfurled, then pulled out. The reverse order for retrieving, but she could run at about 6kts if deployed but used a prodigious amount of coal. The brailing davits were used to roll them back up like a vanitian blind, either using the coaling winches or the capstans.  

 

The booms themselves have two blocks, with a line that runs down the side of the ship from the deck, to the first block near the hull, to the end of he boom and then the line runs don to the base of the net. I expect this is to keep the net taught (ie, heading straight down). 

 

If I'm wrong I'm very happy to be corrected, there is so little reference to this, a google search uses a photo of my dreadnought to explain the history of them (I have no idea who wrote it).

IMG_7452.JPG

IMG_2728.JPG

IMG_7214.JPG

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Western NC was a balmy 50F or so, with rain showers.

 

Sawdust is good, too.  Glues are usually easier to work with especially not using much photo etch. But, it's all fun! ;)

 

Nice shell hole in that last photo there. The deploying/furling of these nets must have been a real drill. I can't imagine trying to move the ship with those deployed, but I guess they did it.

Edited by Canute

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5 hours ago, Osmosis said:

Thanks but I prefer cleaning up saw dust over plastic curly wurlies. But I am still amazed to see the level of detail in these builds.

 

And as for being a "target" when I said "warm" welcome I meant warm it was about 80 degrees in Florida today I wonder what the temp was in Gelderland.

I do both Osmosis, however currently just a wee bit of plastic. The quantity of saw dust, however, far exceeds the curly wurlies.

t was a balmy 11C/51.8F

5 hours ago, Osmosis said:

So these ships actually maneuvered with the torpedo nets deployed?

They could, but usually out of necessity (attack in whatever form), as manouvrability, and speed were compromised

2 hours ago, lmagna said:

I think Carl just looks at us as bigger targets!:pirate41:

Bigger ... nah, to easy ... no fun in that. for somewhere along the way of turning into "native???" Americans that typical dry British humour got stripped off/lost ... ;) :) 

 

Edited by cog

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5 hours ago, RGL said:

My dreadnoughts rigging was complex but I had reference to the AOTS, so I have to figure it out. I expect the nets were pulled out via the capstans using these lines forward. The references say the nets were dropped straight off the shelves into the water an unfurled, then pulled out. The reverse order for retrieving, but she could run at about 6kts if deployed but used a prodigious amount of coal. The brailing davits were used to roll them back up like a vanitian blind, either using the coaling winches or the capstans.  

 

The booms themselves have two blocks, with a line that runs down the side of the ship from the deck, to the first block near the hull, to the end of he boom and then the line runs don to the base of the net. I expect this is to keep the net taught (ie, heading straight down). 

 

If I'm wrong I'm very happy to be corrected, there is so little reference to this, a google search uses a photo of my dreadnought to explain the history of them (I have no idea who wrote it).

IMG_7452.JPG

 

 

Hmmm, breach of copyright ... unless quoted where to find, and the name of the owner .... She does look good, doesn't she .... that's the first build from Greg I followed. I remember the problems with the aireals ....

 

Getting back to the Kriegsmarine, you can actually lookup SMS Konig, of which there is a multitude of images, both real as for models. All of these early German battleships were very much alike, but for the armament, and even that looked alike ...

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7 hours ago, cog said:

 for somewhere along the way of turning into "native???" Americans that typical dry British humour got stripped off/lost ... ;) :) 

But you Dutch arrived here in 1609 and settled in Fort Orange (Albany) in 1614-1615. The "natives"  were the Iroquois,   Cherokee, etc.   ;)

 

And the Stone Houses the Dutch built in Nieuw Dorp are still standing and inhabited.:D

Edited by Jack12477

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