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Hi, I'm building Gorch Fock by Occre and am at the stage where I've double boarded the hull, applied filler to any areas requiring filling, sanded down and applied several coats of a water based primer. What I'm finding is that the planks are lifting in some areas after applying the paint showing their outline. I sand down any slightly raised plank edges but they tend to lift again when more paint is applied. I've followed the instructions of the build to the letter, using contact adhesive to secure the second layer of planking. I need to apply the finishing coat soon and I obviously don't want any outlines of the boarding showing through. Has anyone any ideas why this is happening and any remedial solution would be really appreciated. Thanks in advance. Steve 47

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Hi There, 

 

Welcome to the paint shows everything show. 😁 The same thing happened to me on my Lady Nelson build. Here’s all I can say based on my one hull of experience and lots of knowledge from the forum: Unless the planking is done literally to perfection and then filled to perfection... it’s going to happen. Now, that being said, I’ve seen build logs where the paint job on the hull looked almost to good, to perfect. I think seeing a plank or two here and there is authentic. My .02.

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2 hours ago, Steve47 said:

I've followed the instructions of the build to the letter, using contact adhesive to secure the second layer of planking.

A really poor bit of instruction!    PVA should have been used.  It is not instant grab and clamping can be a challenge.  Unlike a contact adhesive, PVA will last.  PVA can be made to be like a contact adhesive.  A thin coat on both surfaces - let dry - join - apply enough, but not too much heat with an iron.  The bond will not be as strong as wet to wet PVA, but will probably be stronger than DAP. 

 

I have found no solvent that dissolved DAP contact cement.  It losses its bond and makes sticky balls when rubbed with Naphtha or Mineral Spirits.  It is a real mess to undo.  It makes for a bond that lasts maybe 10 - 20 years.  Time and probably 02 , make it become brittle.  A painful learning experience?

 

 

3 hours ago, Steve47 said:

applied several coats of a water based primer.

A single coat of 1:1 diluted shellac  (1 part shellac to 1 part 95% ethanol (shellac thinner)) ( Even if you could get 100% ethanol - which requires distillation from Benzene - as soon as it is exposed to air, it sucks in water from the atmosphere and quickly becomes 95%.).

If you are compulsive - a follow-on coat of full strength shellac.  Buff with a ScotchBrite pad - wipe clean and use any sort of paint.

 

 

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19 hours ago, Dave_E said:

Hi There, 

 

Welcome to the paint shows everything show. 😁 The same thing happened to me on my Lady Nelson build. Here’s all I can say based on my one hull of experience and lots of knowledge from the forum: Unless the planking is done literally to perfection and then filled to perfection... it’s going to happen. Now, that being said, I’ve seen build logs where the paint job on the hull looked almost to good, to perfect. I think seeing a plank or two here and there is authentic. My .02.

BTW, GORCH FOCK has a steel-plated hull, having been built in 1958 ...

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I think it's your water based primer soaking into the wood and causing the wood to swell. This may only affect certain planks because of differences in grain density etc. I suggest a spirit or lacquer based primer to seal the wood, then fill/sand as required, then a second coat of the primer and then your topcoat. I would not use a water based topcoat, just in case, though it would probably be fine.

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  • 1 month later...
On 4/11/2022 at 7:38 PM, E Z Breeze said:

I think it's your water based primer soaking into the wood and causing the wood to swell. This may only affect certain planks because of differences in grain density etc. I suggest a spirit or lacquer based primer to seal the wood, then fill/sand as required, then a second coat of the primer and then your topcoat. I would not use a water based topcoat, just in case, though it would probably be fine.

Thanks E Z Breeze and others.......that's what I did in the end and it was successful. I enclose a photo showing the hull completed from keel to deck level. Just the intricate parts on the decking to complete.........and then the rigging!!

IMG_20220530_120938.jpg

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