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Chapman Frigate by bucknbarney - RADIO - Plank on Frame


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I am new to wooden model ship building. I am a carpenter by trade so I have decided to finally attempt the build I have dreamed of building since I was a young boy, obsessed with Old Ironsides.

 

I wanted to have the ability to make a ship that I can actually sail using R/C. While researching online, I found that it would be best to use plans for a plank on frame instead of a plank on bulkhead build. After a little searching, I found plans for the keel and ribs of a Chapman frigate. The plans are in a different language, and were a little too blurry to read anyhow, so I am having to guess on size and proportions. I know that this model won't be perfect, and far from museum quality. For this project, I just want it to look the part and sail well when on the water!

 

I had the print shop print the plans so that my build will be about four feet long.

 

Aside from my lack of being able to decipher what writing there is on the plans, I have been able to find no instructions to help, so I am doing as much research as possible, using a little common sense and hopefully getting a lot of help from people in the know i.e. all of you!...

 

- After having the plans printed out, I am using carbon paper to transfer the plans to 1/4" birch plywood.

 

- Using a scroll saw, I am cutting out the transferred plans.

 

- I am using files and sand paper to finish the cut pieces.

 

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Edited by bucknbarney
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I have begun placing the ribs, unglued,  in their perspective slots, starting from the stern.

 

I have a question though for those of you in the know... What are those two pieces sitting on the table to, and where do they go?

 

I imagine they are a part of the stern gallery framing, but I cannot find notches on the stern to help in their placement.

 

Any help would be so much appreciated!

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Ok. So, I found a wonderful book in The Edinburgh encyclopedia with some of Chapman's ideas regarding dimensions for masts, yards and sails. Only problem is that I don't really understand the math.

 

It states that:

 

 "If the breadth of a ship is equal to B, the height of the main mast, according to Chapman, will be 3.23 B 11 12; and the height of the main top mast, reckoning from the upper side of the cross trees, that the main mast being denoted by L, will be L 11 12/ 2.73 for frigates."

 

Huh?! lol

 

Everything else like the mizzen, fore, and yards seems to be simpler fractions, based off of the size and dimensions of the main mast.

 

Hmm... is there a chance anyone here may know a simpler way of doing the math for these?

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The length of the main mast is keyed to the ship's breadth. I am not sure what Chapman is saying, but In James Lees' Masting and Rigging of English Ships of War 1625-1860, he says that that the main mast length from the 1719 was 2.4 times the ship's breadth for frigates of 30 guns. The max diameter for the main mast from 1670-1773 was 15/16" per 3 ft of length.

 

Russ

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One thing to remember when building R/C some things don't scale. for example my racing sloop is 37 inches long and has a mast of just shy of 5 ft. If you were to scale that up to full size I don't think the mast would be to scale. This happens a lot in R/C. It is hard to make everything exactly to scale and still function properly.

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Yes I think that would be a good idea. But as I said I only have experience with a modern racing sloop. What you are building is very different. I would also search U tube. There are videos of battles between square rigged R/C ships. And yes the external keel is almost a must.

 

Here is a picture of my sloop.

post-1088-0-20887800-1391699146_thumb.jpg

Edited by Floyd Kershner
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Thanks to all for your awesome help and encouragement! I am planning on keeping this log up as much as possible.

 

Thought I should throw out there that I am hoping to have this model floating by summer and all the masts, yards, sails, rigging and R/C components finished by fall.

 

This may be a bit ambitious, but that is how I am! Lol

Edited by bucknbarney
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Well!! first of what I'm sure will be MANY wonderful pitfalls in this build of mine....

 

Noticed this morning that the keel is bowing. Being that it is 1/4 ply, I can't steam it or go any of the other routes using heat to straighten it as I will delaminate.

 

So... This morning I attempted a fix by just moistening the outer plies on each side and placing the keel on a flat surface with weights to keep it flat while it dried during my work day.

 

Came home and checked at it is straighter! But... alas, it is not perfect. I'm going to attempt it again tonight with the hopes that it will straighten out even more over night.

 

Anyone have any suggestions? I even asked several of my co-workers (I'm a carpenter) and they couldn't think of anything better besides just scrapping the keel and cutting and filing another. I don't want to have to do that!!! But, I will if it comes down to it. 

 

Well, like most projects, there's always something else to do while you wait. So, back to tracing, cutting, and filing more ribs!

Edited by bucknbarney
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I build my hulls in a sort of Hahn method, that is the frames are extended up to a common line and fastened to a building base board until the hull is planked.  This backbone building board keeps everything aligned until there's enough structure to do it itself.  You might add extensions to the frames to accomplish that, and unless it's a horseshoe, you might still use that keel you have.

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No,it is thankfully not in a u-shape! You've got a LOT of experience Jerry so if you say still use it...I'm using it!

 

I've been considering the Hahn method as well. I have been thinking about how I'd ensure that the frames where plumb and level when I glued them and was thinking about using spacer blocks, 90 degree angle braces and clamps. Still, it appears to be a little easier, after the building base has been made, to use the Hahn method.

Edited by bucknbarney
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