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Byrnes Drawplate


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18 replies to this topic

#1
Landlocked123

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Hi All,

Santa was good enough to bring me a Byrnes Drawplate :).

I've never used a Drawplate before and would appreciate any tips and pointers. Thanks.

Best,
John
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#2
russ

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I have a Byrnes draw plate and it is the best one I have. It has a great cutting edge at each hole. It is easy to use and I would not trade it for anything.

 

Insert the material into the side opposite the countersink and then pull it through from the countersunk side of the hole. You can use pliers to hold on to the end while you draw it through. I use my thumb and forefinger, but others use pliers.

 

You can clamp it to your desk or table, but I have never done that. I hold it in my hand as I work. I can usually get a 5-6 inch length on each piece if I want them that long.

 

Make sure you have a piece that is not too large for the hole. I draw my bamboo through the same hole several times, angling it differently with each successive pass to ensure I am ready to move to the next hole. Be patient and do not try and work too fast. The faster you go, the more breakage you will have. Also, the more practice you have, the easier it will be to use.

 

You should experiment with it to see what approach works best for you. Have fun.

 

Russ


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#3
Jaager

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There are also draw tongs.  They are for gripping wire, but work with

bamboo - if pieces of sandpaper are used as an interface to grip and

you do not squeeze too hard.

 

drawTongs.jpg


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#4
wefalck

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These tongs really only make sense, when you have a draw-bench. A draw-bench is used for drawing wires, not wood/bamboo. The draw-plate is fixed at one end and at the other there is a chain with a geared winding mechanism, or a belt. The hooked arm of the tongs points upward, while the straight one slides on the bench - in this way the pressure on the wire increases the stronger you pull. Here a historical example from the Internet:

draw-bench.jpg

Source: http://phiden.net/wp.../draw-bench.jpg

 

I don't think these tongs would be useful to draw material for tree-nails ...


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#5
Landlocked123

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Thanks Guys.

Can one draw other woods than bamboo?

Best,
John

Edited by Landlocked123, 26 December 2016 - 10:51 PM.

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#6
russ

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Yes, any wood can be drawn. Some will probably be better than others. A straight grained material will be best. It will have less breakage be easier to pull.

 

Russ


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#7
Mike Y

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Yes, I draw a boxwood nails. Requires a nice straight grained piece to cut the strips from, but works fine after some practice. Also works as a reliable mood measurement tool. One must be totally calm when using it - otherwise the piece will snap somewhere in the small hole :)


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#8
BANYAN

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May not be the best technique but I also found it is better to soak the wood to be drawn first; especially bamboo.  

 

cheers

 

Pat


Edited by BANYAN, 26 December 2016 - 10:57 PM.

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#9
Dupree Allen

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Has anyone used Orange wood to draw and make nails? From somewhere in the past I have acquired a box of 2500 Orange Wood cuticle sticks. Bound to be useful for something other than glue sticks.


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#10
Aussie048

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Have a look at Hornets Bamboo Skewe spliter.

 

 http://modelshipworl...on/#entry216766.

 

I made one up and found by loosening up the wing nuts made it easier to pull through the spliter.

 

I also drill some holes in some aluminium larger than what the the Byrnes Drawplate to the same size as the largest hole in the Byrnes Drawplage is. This takes off chunky bits of the skewer after it has gone through the spliter ready for the Drawplate

 

Cheers

Geoff


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#11
Captain Slog

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These tongs really only make sense, when you have a draw-bench.

 

 

Thanks for the explanation and photo; I wondered what the curved handle was for.  You learn something new here everyday.

 

Cheers

Slog


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#12
druxey

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You will have better control and results if you clamp the drawplate and use both hands to pull the material through.


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#13
Cap'n'Bob

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Of course draw plates were originally used to reduce the diameter of gold and silver wire for jewelers.  The wire was annealed and pulled through from the larger diameter side of the plate to squeeze the wire to the smaller size.  The wire was annealed again and the process repeated as many times as necessary to achieve the desired diameter.  This can be done with brass wire to get that odd size that you cannot find.

 

Bob


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#14
wefalck

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Although hardened steel draw-plates were used for brass and iron/steel, these would wear rapidly, resulting in a gradual increase of the diameter. So, today carbide or ruby dies are used for anything harder than copper and, of course, in any commercial context.

 

I would doubt that drawing your own wire without a draw-bench as illustrated above would be successful. The forces and steady action required would be difficult to apply by simple drawing with elbow grease. The process results in the metal sort of flowing and this has to be maintained also without changing the direction of pull. Otherwise the wire will break.

 

However, this is digression from the original subject ...


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wefalck

 

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#15
allanyed

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I usually grasp the wood with a folded piece of sandpaper between my thumb and finger but resort to pliers now and then.    The sand paper gives better control.  Everything else Russ said as well......  

 

Allan


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#16
lehmann

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Although hardened steel draw-plates were used for brass and iron/steel, these would wear rapidly, resulting in a gradual increase of the diameter. So, today carbide or ruby dies are used for anything harder than copper and, of course, in any commercial context.

Also, commercial drawing machines flood the die with oil, which lubricates the hole and takes away heat.   Even for hand drawing of metals, some oil, wax or grease is recommended to reduce wear of the holes and to reduce the required pulling force.  This is, of course, messy if done by hand, so I can see how a drawing bench would be desirable.  


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Bruce

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#17
Cap'n'Bob

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Yes but it was done by hand for many years before someone came up with the bench idea.

 

Bob


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Every build is a learning experience.

 

Current build:  Two Edwardian launches

 

Completed builds:  US Coast Guard Pequot   Friendship-sloop,  Schooner Lettie-G.-Howard,   Spray,   Grand-Banks-dory

                                                a gaff rigged yawl,  HOGA (YT-146),  Int'l Dragon Class II

 

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#18
wefalck

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I believe draw-benches existed since the Middle Age. There is also a variety, where the drawn wire is wound up on a reel that also transmits the pulling force.


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wefalck

 

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#19
Cap'n'Bob

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My first knowledge of a draw plate was in one of the French classics, which I read as a teen.  The author described a man, earning a living by, sitting on the floor bracing the draw plate with his feet while he pulled the gold wire for the jeweler. 

 

Bob


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Every build is a learning experience.

 

Current build:  Two Edwardian launches

 

Completed builds:  US Coast Guard Pequot   Friendship-sloop,  Schooner Lettie-G.-Howard,   Spray,   Grand-Banks-dory

                                                a gaff rigged yawl,  HOGA (YT-146),  Int'l Dragon Class II

 

In the Gallary:   Catboat,   International-Dragon-Class,   Spray





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