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micro table saw stop


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From Marks Idea I have done this drawing of a micro adjustable stop.

 

The main body can be made from a small block of 2x4  and the adjustable bar can be metal or wood dowel The threaded screw in the end is a 4x40 but can virtually be any small machine screw, in fact the smaller it is the finer the adjustment. The main bar has a flat cut or filed on one side to prevent it rotating as it is clamped

 

The other two screws clamp the block to the table.

 

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Michael

 

 

micro adjustment.pdf

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Nice, Michael! Much simpler and more elegant than my original sketch.

 

I worried at first that the micro adjusting screw needs to be accessible even when the fence might be too close for a screwdriver to fit, and then I remembered that the fence can simply be moved away. Problem solved.

 

I'll try building this next weekend; it will really come in handy for repeatable strips.

 

Mark

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Hi Michael, Here is Mk1 of the jig. I didn't get around to making the specialized clamp around the table yet, and used a regular clamp temporarily to see how it would work. It is great. The micro-adjuster allowed me to sneak up on a perfect measure, and it was very fast and efficient to cut, move the fence and wood, cut again. It is safer, and the saw cuts more cleanly, making those small cuts on the left side of the sawblade rather than tight up against the fence. The nylon screw is gentle on the edge of the wood, and acts as a featherboard of sorts for holding the wood against the fence.

 

My original drawing shows the clamp a little out of proportion to the actual table top. There is actually less overhang, and so less area for the clamp to grip. I am not sure how sturdy this original idea will be. I'll work on it another time...

 

Thanks again for the elegant idea of the rod rather than the sliding wood stop.

 

Mark

 

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That's a great idea Mark.  Where you show the open dado at the rear of your second posted drawing, could also be left solid/filled (as in your original) with the rebate/dado only deep enough to support the holder (i.e. slides over the table until meeting the solid rear piece) which would provide additional supprot to keep the jig square to the table (not really that important though). This approach gets around the width limitations imposed by a featherboard attached to a flat bar in the mitre slot and keeps the fingers out of the way if you position it closer to (but still behind) the leading edge of the blade for such thin cuts.

 

Thanks for sharing.

 

Pat

Edited by BANYAN
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Hello Mark, it is great that you are able to make this work. In reading about your clamp to the table issue, a though comes to me that you could simply drill and tap the surface of the saw and bolt the stop body down to the table. and in retrospect I believe this would be a more stable and safer option.

It would depend of course on the thickness of the table top but if it is 16 gauge or more or you could still use a fine thread to set it down.

 

Michael

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Michael,

 

I think you just solved the "biggie" issue for me.  My saw has no overhang and I was trying to figure out how to set this thing up with zero-play.  Now to convince my wallet that I need to buy some taps.

 

 

One way around the no overhang problem is possible if you have a mitre slot across the top of the table. Cut a piece of wood to fit the mitre slot and down the centre of that cut a slot say 3mm wide. Mount a piece of wood on that, for example a featherboard and secure it with a couple of M3 countersunk head screws and wing nuts. As you tighten the wing nuts the countersunk heads of the screws will force the slot open a little bit more making it a tight fit in the mitre slot. I'll try and draw a picture  . . . 

Edited by Yambo
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  • 7 months later...

Yambo I finally got round to following your suggestion of using the mitre slot on my own saw. I have made a simple stop using a scrap of oak and some 1/4 x 20 cap screws.

 

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The cap screw sticking up is a longer one for in-between sizes without changing the block to another set of bolts, the main block is able to be set for some general wide cuts as well. I looked for some wing nuts but I don't have any. using this stop with the sliding fence allows me to cut very accurately now.

 

Michael

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  • 4 months later...

ok, dumb question,

why set up so that the cut requires this jig rather than just use the fence side of the blade for the cut off plank?

I ask because when I look at the write up at hobby mill, he is set up for the cut off piece (thin piece) to be on the side with the fence and it seems to work for him.

 

I appreciate the help.

Richard

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There was a long discussion about this on MSW 1.0 which referred to the need for thin strips to be able to move from the blade as they are cut. To do this a feather board is used, or a stop of some kind. There was a great article by Bob Sorenson on this called "TIPS AND TECHNIQUES: MILLING SCALE LUMBER, dated 23 Feb 2011 which you could try to find on the web. I still have the pdf of that article should you want it. If people are interested, I could put it in the downloads section.

 

Others on this forum who are more experienced than I am will probably chip in with more detailed advice. I use this method all the time and it provides great accuracy.

 

Tony

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I ask because when I look at the write up at hobby mill, he is set up for the cut off piece (thin piece) to be on the side with the fence and it seems to work for him.

Hi Richard, not a dumb question at all, and if you read the whole of the information on the Hobby mill site you will also notice that Jeff said that he was not endorsing his method  or recommending it as a preferred method but that it worked for him.

 

I might suggest that like all things there are a number of different ways to acheive the same results, what is comfortable for some is not for others, that said having a larger "vocabulary" enables one to be able to use more than just one word.

 

Some times the particular piece of wood is more easily cut using one or the other methods or even types of saw.

This has been my experience.

 

michael

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I would add that cutting the thin piece on the fence side means that you cannot easily use a push stick. I use one that hooks over the fence, and has some sandpaper on the bottom surface to grip the stock. It keeps the stock flat on the table, and tight against the fence. this helps avoid any vibration in the cut. But this needs enough stock between the blade and the fence to give clearance for the push stick. Much easier and safer to cut the thin piece off the blade side, and then index the fence over with the stop for the next cut.

 

Mark

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