Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I have just recently started my fourth build, the Vanguard, and have a question regarding deck planking. On my prior builds (Mississippi River Boat, Blue Shadow, and the Corsair), I only had to deal with one main deck, so I have always used line/string/thread for the deck planking running parallel with the planks, and between the plank butt ends. On the Vanguard, because of the size, number of decks, and width of the planking material (3 mm), I decided to use the bottom deck which is not going to be very visible in the finished model to try a different approach at the butt ends of the planks only.

 

I have experimented with a black Sharpie (too much bleed), black stamp ink (again, too much bleed, but better than the Sharpie, especially if I alternate between one plank using the black stamp ink and the next planks on both ends with nothing on the butt ends), black water color pencil and a graphite carpenter's pencil. All of these methods produce less than satisfactory results, at least to me. Before I revert back to using .10 mm or .15 mm line between the butt end of the planks, I wondered if anyone out there has tried and likes another method that I could try on the lower deck since it won't be seen for the most part.

 

Any suggestions? Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On decks I have used a simple number 2 pencil on one edge of the plank and on one end. It gives a subtle line that suggests a caulked seam. Here is a look at a model that I restored using this method. This was a yacht so there is a glossy finish, but you can see how the seams show up with a clear finish.

 

Russ

deck side final finish.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Russ:

 

Thanks for the picture and the suggestion. I forgot that I have also tried the #2 pencil method on prior builds, and most recently on the display case for the Corsair where I planked the bottom of the case with 6 mm wide planks and 1mm walnut dowel tree-nails. It came out really nice, but I spent a whole lot of time running a pencil across the ends of every plank, and when I started planking the display case, I decided I wanted a little more distinct lines, so I ended up with line at the butt ends after all.

 

Your deck looks really good, especially with only doing one side and one end of each plank.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am in the finale stages of building the Vanguard.  For the deck planking I used a Woodcraft Marker. They are made in Japan, and in this country are available in craft shops. I think they are also available at Modeler's Shipyard near Sydney.  They have a website and do mail order.

 

You can have a look at the results by taking a look at my Vanguard log.

 

All the best 

rmc

Link to comment
Share on other sites

RMC: Can you give me any more information on the marker you used? Maybe an item number, description, or SKU so I can check out the Modeler's shop in Sydney website. I assume what you used is black? Did you use the marker on both sides and both ends?

 

I have looked at your build log and I think you did a great job on the deck.

 

Scott: When I have used the pencil method, I have also done both ends and both sides. The last two ships I built, I used .15 thread for all the "caulking", parallel to the stripes and at the butt ends, and generally really like the distinctiveness the black thread gives. I found that it also gives a slight little "cushion" between the planks in case they might occasionally have a less than perfect edge. I just thought with all the planking that has to be done on the Vanguard, maybe there was a better way then what I have done in the past.

 

Big part of the reason I love this website is seeing what other's have come up with to resolve issues, or invent jigs, and especially to look ahead on a builder's log to see what issues I am going to confront down the road, and how the builder solved them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The best method I've found is to use a black "Brush" type Archival Ink Pen, available from most Art Supply stores. It's similar to a felt pen but the ink WON'T bleed into the timber. Use the SIDE of the tip, applied from the BACK side of the plank in case you slip, and on ONE edge and butt join of each plank :

 

Archival Ink Pen.JPG

Top and Butt Planking.jpg

 

:cheers:  Danny

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Danny,

 

Thank you for that Awsome Tip on turning the plank over, I have always been to proud to admit 

I almost always slip and destroy my plank!. Especially when someone is watching me plank,

now all I have to do is flip my plank and magic! It's gone. However I well not admit I slipped (lol)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The brand is 'Woodcraft' made by Kuretake Co Ltd Japan. I used the chisel tip 6mm. It is very easy to use and has all the attributes of the Brush described above - acid free etc.   ..... I guess you pay your money and make your choice.

 

I am just about to go away for a few days and haven't the time to include a photo. 

 

All the best wiith your vanguard.

 

rmc (Bob)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dan: Thanks for the tip and the picture. We have a local art supply store, so I will give them a look-see and try it.

 

RMC: Thanks for the info...will check it our also.

 

BTW: I am changing the wood from the kit supplied to a harder wood which should help with the bleed. I tested some basswood and tanganika, and the difference was very noticeable. The tanganika did not bleed very much at all compared to the softer basswood using a black stamp pad. I just "tapped" the end twice on the pad and it gave me a good clean covering...especially when I only did one end. I then did a test with .10 thread on the butt ends and not a visible difference vs. the stamp pad pieces.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you use a number 2 pencil, as I do, Make sure you do not color only the top edge corner of the plank. Color the entire side edge. If you don't, when it comes time to finish sanding the deck, you may sand all the color off and wind up with no caulking. Please don't as me how I know this.

 

Regards

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

All:

 

Thanks for all your suggestions. The local art supply store had some of the Pigma Brush applicators available, so I bought a couple and used them on most of the bottom deck of the Vanguard...the part that is visible from above. I ended up with using line (.15mm) parallel to the planks, and used the brush on every other butt joint.

 

I like the way it came out, and I really think this whole issue of "caulking" is one of those that everyone has their own way that they like the best. None of my builds will end up in a museum, so it's everyone's personal taste that really matters in the end. 

 

I do appreciate all the feedback. I think it is really fun to see how helpful all modeler's are, and all the different techniques that we all use to basically do the same task.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For what it's worth, I am firmly in the #2 pencil camp.  For me, solid black is not subtle enough.  I have the privilege  of belonging to a club with access to actual tall ships.  I can go up on the Berkeley  and look down on HMS SURPRISE and CALIFORNIAN and see how real caulking looks.  Even so, scale distance is only 1.5 to 2 feet away.  Mentally factoring in the effect of distance on color and I feel the old #2 represents it best.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...