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Looking for galley stack /chimney /funnel / ventilator / flue fitting


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Hi everyone I am wondering if someone knows the best place to get a brass or any metal galley chimney /stack / flue / ventilator / funnel that I can add to my little revenue cutter. Stack should be like 3/4" length tops at 1/64 scale. Havent seen too many of themthey seem surprisingly hard to come by so maybe one of you knows a decent company or version that may have them. I already checked corwall uk. Closest Ive seen is this one below. :)

 

Charlie

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Edited by CharlieZardoz
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I have not seen one of that shape during my searches Charlie; I wish you luck.

 

Have you considered making one?  Seems like a bit of suitably sized brass tube cut cleanly at 45 degrees then soldered to form the 90-degree angle would make the main part.  Simply find some conical shape in any material/medium, drill out and slide over the base - paint it black and hey presto :)

 

cheers

 

Pat

 

 

Edited by BANYAN
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Ooof yeah that might be an alternative however my skill in metal work is ziltch. Especially for something so small however if no suitable brass parts are out there (figured someone might know on here) well I might very well give it a go from scratch. Its the fact that it tapers toward the end that feels challenging. :)

Edited by CharlieZardoz
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Hi Charlie

You might try using a straight tube of K&S brass, (Or solid rod if you prefer). Cut a piece somewhat longer than you will need and chuck it into a Dremel, drill, or what ever you use and file the taper on the end. K&S tubing has fairly thick walls. When you get the taper you want cut a notch at the bending location and fold it 45 degrees. you can then either solder or if you prefer glue it and like stated before build the base from anything you want. One way would be to take the next size larger tubing and make another tapered cone just like the first and when you have the right shape cut it off and slide it over the other main pipe. Again solder or glue.

 

You can do pretty much the same thing using aluminum tubing but I find the softer metal, not being able to solder it, plus it likes to clog my files more trouble than using brass.

 

Give it a try, if nothing else it is a cheap experment.

Lou 

Edited by lmagna
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Although I would make this from brass myself, there's no reason you couldn't make it from wood if you want to paint it black. You can use a full-size electric drill held in a stand or clamped in a vise as a makeshift lathe and shape that tapered part with files or sanding sticks. The straight part of the stack can be made from pieces of dowel. You can drill a hole in the end of the dowel at the top of the stack so it looks more like a pipe. This should be a pretty simple project.

 

Cheers -

John

 

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If you had some Cad skills it could be 3d model up sent to Shapeways online printing services and have it printed out within a week. I did all my stacks. flues and whistle on my riverboat. I would cost between 3-7 dollars and the detail will be sharp. If you want I may have time to model it up, print and ship to you. about an hour of my time.

Lee

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Thanks guys! I have ordered the bluejacket version as well as caldercrafts and cast your anchor versions as they all together cost me less than $20 :D However im not sure if they will meet the level or realism I like in my models however they will at least serve as study models for me to practice for scratch. And yes I actually just ordered guns from seamless for the sms dresden model I have im curious to see what they look like making cad parts seems not all that different than making laser parts. :)

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On 11/14/2017 at 1:12 PM, CharlieZardoz said:

the best place to get a brass or any metal galley chimney /stack / flue

Charlie,

 

It may be easy to order hollow and solid stock brass from Model Expo or the other Hobby something forgot last name.

It seems it would be easy to solder one appears to be a very simple shape.

 

I might be missing something in your post at times I have a simple mind.:huh:

 

Good Luck

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Looks good in the photo Charlie; but the real test is whether you like it :)  As to the tarp, that is one option I think, not sure if they may have used a lead 'flashing' in a grating.  Only problem is that the heat from the "charlie noble' (funnel) may have ignited a tarp covering that was so cl;ose?

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Hey Pat that's exactly my quandary. I did make an attempt on my model to add a lead flashing and looking at my image it didn't look right. The Mamoli kit has a bolted flash over the grating (see image). Or I could remove the grating entirely and just seal the hatch kind of like the Armed Virginia Schooner model (see image). The next class revenue cutter Morris/Taney has the stack outside the grating (check image with arrow). Also the Corel Ranger verion of the Doughty cutter eliminated the grating/combing entirely and did the same approach like Morris/Taney model. However I suppose I am following the Krick/Bluejacket design which follows Chapelle's plans and has the stack go right through the grating port. The Krick model shows a cloth tarp covering the area (see image) but perhaps you are right about the heat. The joy and perhaps frustration of ship modeling is that there are multiple ways to interpret plans so really it's just determining what was the most sensible and efficient method a ship builder would use to solve a problem. :) 

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HI yeah im using these for examples of the bolted flash and realizing a few model makers put the funnel facing foward in error. Theres that logic/sensibility again Im not a sailor myself but try and think through the functionality of parts on ships which is why bolting a plate to a grating seems silly to me no? ;)

Edited by CharlieZardoz
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Hi Charlie - 

 

Putting on my shipwright's cap, here's my two cents:  The 'flashing' is not so much to keep water out of the galley as it is to stabilize the chimney coming off the stove.  It would need some support as it goes up through the deck, and a strong metal plate secured to the grating would fit the bill.   Any sort of wooden support would get too hot, I think.  When it rained, the tarp that appears in one of the Mamoli photos could be used (although I am a bit wary of relying on a detail from a model where the gratings do not have a solid perimeter).

 

As for the direction of the top of the Charlie Noble, pretty much any orientation is OK, since they turned to stay out of the windstream.  Use your best artistic judgement.  In the real world, sideways to the wind was probably best, since it would pull the smoke most strongly up the chimney, like blowing across the top of a straw.  They just had to be sure not to face it into the wind, or the smoke would be blown right back down. 

 

The carronade and pivot mount are coming along nicely.

 

Happy Thanksgiving to one and all.

 

Dan

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Cool thank you Dan in that case I will endeavour to make the plate and place it over the grating with a few treenails along the edge. My question now is finding a way to attach a plate on this funnel right where that ring is so that it is flush yet I can slide it over the wider edge without cutting the bluejacket piece in half. Maybe a rubber sheet or some material that has elasticity? I tried with that plastic piece but it warped as you can see. The final plate will be about 3/16". Any thoughts from anyone?

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Charlie,

 

What about black cardstock? Cut the cardstock then overlap in the center to make the hole.  It would make sense that the cover was metal and due to the stack, it probably couldn't be in one piece.  Insert stack, set and clue cardstock in place. As for the cardstock... we fake a lot of things with cardstock.

Edited by mtaylor
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Think were I doing this for real, it would be two pieces. One cone shaped with the hole for the vent through the center and nailed to the hatch grate. The other piece would be attached to the vent, also cone shaped to fit over the first cone and allowed to rotate as needed. Rigged to come apart quickly and the vent and grate replaced with a hatch cover that could be tarped and battened down.

jud

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Charlie,

 

Here is a possible simple but stupid suggestion, coming from one that has less experience than most of the others making suggestions. Place the grating as just a grating re-position the stack behind the foremast and use Marks suggestion of card stock for flashing.

OK all ready for my beat down. :default_wallbash: :)

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Lol a perfectly sensible suggestion John. I considered taking the stack out of the grating area entirely, thing is I am following Chapelle's plan and he probably assumed that such a small ship had to be as compact as possible. I honestly couldn't tell you what is the most mechanically sound approach but I figured I would just follow the plans and trust Chapelle knew what he was talking about and at the very least it keeps me from over thinking especially when I lack the wisdom to adequately take creative licenses and avoid faux pas. ;)

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What I would expect to find aboard such a vessel would be a rotating and quickly removable stack with maybe a half grate hatch cover with the other half lying alongside the hatch or lashed to the mast. Might find some lines and poles for an awning over the open hatch. When you batten down, you want water to stay out and the covers to be secure, not having the galley stove lit, would be of little concern, eat biscuit and drink grog.

jud  :pirate41:Part of a day in the Brown Water navy, 1968.

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Edited by jud
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