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Hi All, 

 

I'm slowly but sure working on a scratch build of the USS O'Bannon in 1/144 scale and have a question about the deck. So far, many areas look a little plain, particularly in the bow just behind the anchor chains and windlass. I'm wondering if I should include seams for the deck plating or in some cases, I've seen pictures where there is a "pathway" of a slightly darker shade that seems to go around the deck almost like a sidewalk painted on the deck. 

 

Any ideas on what that is and whether it would be appropriate for the O'Bannon?

 

Here is an example:

 

ship4.jpg?mw=1000&mh=800

 

and another:

IMG_2258.jpg

 

(Sorry if I'm getting the terms wrong. I'm not a native speaker of Naval lingo.)

 

Thanks.

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'Anti-skid' paint was certainly used on some ships where better footing was needed.  The old and rather grotty photo below shows the fore deck of one of my old ships  - MV 'Meringa' - with a strip of 'anti-skid' painted.  it was needed on this ship as she was a sugar carrier and the deck was a death trap with wet sugar on it.  The paint was made by simply adding copious amounts of sand to ordinary deck paint.

 

As Ken has advised, old phots of the actual ship would be helpful in sorting out proper placement.

 

John

 

95061244_104-MVMeringa.jpg.4e17d7906b133670a26c218fcbe694b4.jpg

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Salt water on a slick painted deck even under normal at-sea conditions could be hazardous.  In rough conditions:  very dangerous.  Non skid paint was/is used on weather decks where people are likely to walk.  It is too expensive to use on the whole deck.  Similarly, ladder treads have either non-slip diamond tread or non-skid-like tread.  

544195647_DD699.jpg.1d2994574d6bb5801cd8e89a5ed7b873.jpg

 

I don't know if it will work on 144 scale, but black 400 or 600 grit sand paper words great on 1/96 scale.

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All the ships I served in had the deck painted haze grey with a wide portion in the center of nonskid.   This was deck grey(a darker grey) with sand added.  It was always a bear to remove for repainting.  You had to use a needle gun. On the main deck abreast the superstructure you ended up with about 6 inches of haze grey on either side of the deck grey nonskid.

 

Regards,

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Thanks all for the replies. You’ve convinced me to try to replicate with a fine grained sand paper. I’ll probably paint it the same blue as the deck, maybe a shade darker. 

 

I knew someone on here would have first hand experience. Thank you for sharing it. Nunnhi, thanks for the photo. I hope mine turns out as well.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Photo 1960 USS Ammen DD 527, our main decks were painted with sand added to the walkways, non skid stick-ons were used in the superstructure and below decks, a the foot of ladders, both sides of watertight doors and around hatches and scuttles, etc. Photo is after a weeks cleanup after a collision at sea, 19 July 1960. Internet has lots about the wreck.

 

1630910661_DIRECTFROMCEARCLICK025.1.thumb.jpg.7843fc473a66ff9098921f87d767eb89.jpg

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The original question got me to wondering about the use of continuous non skid pathways vs. the rectangular "tread strips" that we often see in pictures of US Navy ships in the WWII era.   I looked in what references I have, but turned up very little.    

 

In "Fletcher-Class Destroyers" by Alan Raven there's a plan of the main deck and O1 level on pp. 84-85.   The caption there says "General Arrangement of Main & Superstructure Decks Showing Layout  of Non-Slip Walkways Laid onto the Decks.   Although this arrangement was generally followed, there were many exceptions, as shown in the photos of deck views."

 

And in "The Floating Drydock's Plan Book The Fletcher Class" on p. 117 there's a photo from Oct 1944 of USS Norman Scott (DD 690)  which says "Like many ships, she had  deck tread strips added rather than solid walkways."

 

My takeaway from this meager information is that one is not likely to know what the ship being modeled had without contemporary photos of it.     

 

For information about the materials, this link looks like a great starting point: https://www.shipcamouflage.com/painting_and_cementing_chapter4.htm#Miscellaneous Items 

 

Bob

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Re. FLETCHER class DDs in WWII & deck paint:

It would depend on if the ship you were modeling was painted in a camouflaged paint scheme, which one, etc. or not. This would also depend on the time frame you are depicting your model. If it was not camouflaged, then the std. navy paint scheme for that time period would be indicated. Generally speaking, the deck would be Deck Gray (Haze Gray which was mentioned earlier by another respondent is for vertical surfaces, not horizontal surfaces). The main deck of FLETCHER class DDs also had some form of non-skid deck treads or walkways laid out (such as shown in Don's model pictured in his earlier post). This was usually black in color, as mentioned earlier paint mixed with sand to give a "gritty" surface.

Here is a good shot of DD-522 in camo showing her main deck in 1944:

560163336_DD522-26Aug44_1.jpg.9d550162d9c400a6ee6a7c4d07a3c4c2.jpg

As you can see, there is no walkway or deck treads laid down; the main deck & above levels follow the camo pattern from the sides of the hull. Sorry, I don't have a suitable photo of a FLETCHER during WWII showing the main deck with std. paint scheme. A good source for authentic paint chips for USN WWII era ships is from Snyder & Short - https://www.shipcamouflage.com/ and is well worth the money!

Hope this helps,

Hank

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1 hour ago, chris watton said:

I do know that some professional model makers, who specialise in more modern vessels sometimes use fine wet and dry paper to simulate the the anti-slip surface, looks pretty realistic when in place.

I agree, in fact - I used a very fine grit dk. gray sandpaper for the helo deck on my NEW JERSEY battleship model (1:200 scale) - spray adhered to the plastic underneath. Being that your model is 1/144 scale, you might want to check around for deck decals that are made in that scale for a FLETCHER class DD. I do know that the Revell 1/144 FLETCHER DD kit (Revell Germany) includes decals for the main deck non-slip walkways (I just looked at my kit).

Hope this helps!

Hank

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While this method was used by RAN (and RN I think) ships, it may useful to know that even up to the very early 1970s, the RAN used strips of heavy duty sandpaper as deck tread until the introduction of two part epoxy based granular paint (some sort of sand or grit introduced to the mixture).  The sandpaper strips were reasonably large strips self-adhesive (sticky backed), and kept pretty by using a very thin (much diluted) flat black paint.  I do not know if the USN employed similar methods.

 

43649847_Vampireoverbow.thumb.jpg.ba1e2c07d15f903070fd593037abe6f4.jpg

 

 

This older B+W photo of HMAS Vampire shows what I mean.  As you may also note, the forecastle was given a checker-plate and welded strip treatment to assist footing grip.  I hope this helps.

 

cheers

 

Pat

 

 

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When I was kid in the 50's, my dad who was a Naval WWII and Korea Vet, acquired some anti-slip stick-on strips.  He used them on the cellar steps which were painted 2x10's.  They were a black color with what looked like glass beads imbeded.  At the right angle the had a sparkle effect.  These strips lasted 40 years that I know of.  He was one that always went to surplus sales at the Philly Navy Yard,  came home with all kinds of what my mom thought was junk.

 

BobW

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Back in the late 70's, a friend and I were building Islander 32 yacht models from fiber glass.    When it came time to make the non-skid patterns for the deck, I mixed powdered glass with paint.  Masked off the pattern where the deck was to remain smooth, then painted the appropriate non-side areas with this mixture.    Worked beautifully as it was consistent and did not look out of scale.    

Allan

 

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