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Micro Blocks


dafi
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And some more basic work. To do the side takles of my guns in 1:100 I need small blocks. The smallest commercially available are the 2 mm from JB, great stuff but still a little bit to big for my taste. So I wanted to see what there is still possible :-)

 

Literature shows several ways of doing blocks, most of them done in a similar way, so I am following that, just have to take out most of the machinery because of the size.

 

First I prepared a batten of 1,5 mm high and 1 mm thick, and marked it all 2 mm which gave the basic size of these ambitious project ...

 

800_victory-pullies_8571.jpg

 

... each of these marks got a diagonal cut in one direction and after all done, the batten was turned and the other side cut, so the grooves on one side were finished. Repeated on all four sides ...

 

800_victory-pullies_8572.jpg

 

... and this was achieved rather fast, some matt varnish to strengthen the edges ...

 

800_victory-pullies_8573.jpg

 

... and first drilling tests ...

 

800_victory-pullies_8570.jpg

 

... with the 0,5er drill. Result, difficult to get the right place, so more testing until it looked like in a swiss cheese factory ...

 

800_victory-pullies_8574.jpg

 

... and finally the enlightenment: 0,5 mm drill fixed in the stand, a stop in 0,5 mm distance is fixed. The stop has the width of 2 mm which facilitates positioning. 

Now hold the batten tight and near at both sides and slide it up the stop until drilled ...

 

800_victory-pullies_8575.jpg

 

... move down and turn the batten 180° around the longitudinal axis, slide up and drill the second hole :-) 

(I spared you the fingers on the picture :-)

 

Looks already ok, the four blocks left of my little worker are the single blocks of 1 mm x 1 mm x 2 mm - hihihihihi - ... 

 

800_victory-pullies_8579.jpg

 

... a second coat of varnish, the cutter makes the groove on the side for the line - the most difficult part on the whole action - some sanding off of the edges, some more varnish and done. They stay on the batten and will be cut just prior to production for not getting lost - just in time production  :-)

 

800_victory-pullies_8580.jpg

 

Just a family picture: the Krick 3 mm, the JB 2 mm and Microline from dafi, and as it looks nice a macro shot.

 

800_victory-pullies_8583.jpg

 

So I already see the crowd out there laughing in anticipation of the knots in dafis fingers, while trying to tying some rigging onto these littel bits ...

 


... and this was the result with a descent rope:

 

800_Victory-tackle_9575.jpg

 

*jumpingofhappiness*

 

Not yet perfect, but the direction is right :-)

 

Lieber Gruß, Daniel


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And it continued with an answer from Jan here in MSW:
 
You will drive yourself insane!
My guess is that your next "problem" will be to get these tiny blocks stropped according the rule book :)
Next you will realize that blocks have sheaves,
that sheaves are held into position by iron pins,
that these pins have nail like heads,
that.... etc.
 
We will follow your route to insanity with ever increasing admiration!
 
Jan
 
OK-OK-OK, Jan´s challenge was accepted :-) The stropping we had already, so the next is ...
 
800_victory_blocks_9602.jpg
 
... put a 1 mm poly rod into the machine, drill with 0,4 mm, turning the chuck of the lathe of course by hand ...
 
800_victory_blocks_9604.jpg
 
... and cutting it off still on the drill to 0,5 mm slices ...
 
800_victory_blocks_9605.jpg
 
... and this is the result of the production.
 
So what is missing next for some good blocks? The casing:
 
So milling a double slot and a single slot into a 2,5 mm x 1 mm batten ...
 
800_victory_blocks_9608.jpg
 
... doing some carving ...
 
800_victory_blocks_9609.jpg
 
... colored the disks with marker for not adding to the thickness ...
 
800_victory_blocks_9611.jpg
 
... inserted the disks and the axles  ...
 
800_victory_blocks_9613.jpg
 
... and cleared it up.
 
800_victory_blocks_9621.jpg
 
And here the family shot with the benchmark, the wonderful 2 x 2 x 2 mm block from JB. 
 
800_victory_blocks_9625.jpg
 
While stropping I finally re-remembered the great power-splice, which makes things easier and cleaner, prepared a loop ...
 
800_victory_blocks_9628.jpg
 
... and slid the block into it, secured with glue and  ... 
 
*drummrollandsmallfanfare*
800_victory_blocks_9649.jpg
 
... and the thing on place :-)
 
Lessons learned: 
It is really possible to make blocks of 2,5 x 2,5 x 1 mm with turning sheaves! And by pulling on the loose end, the tackle works much easier than the other ones without :-) :-) :-)
 
The most difficult? Checking if the sheaves are turning after securing the axles with glue. Managed to do this with the point of a needle. Confirmed positivly!
 
;-)
 
Liebe Grüße Daniel
Edited by dafi
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Congratulation you have done a wonderful job.  Now if you want I will call the boys in the white coats to escort you to the nearest bar for a stiff drink.  Seriously a very nice job.

David B

Edited by dgbot
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Very good Daniel. I am impressed with your detailed description as well as your craftsmanship. I love it.
 

I can see that this method would be good for me to try on 'sheaves', the ones that go through the hull and are a bit bigger than most blocks. That does not involve all your great details about making blocks but would be interesting to try.

Vielen dank.

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Such drills can be purchased with either 1 mm or 1.5 mm shafts from jewellers and clockmakers supply houses, or with 2.35 mm shaft from some jewellers or from modellers supply houses. The smallest drills with 2.35 mm shaft though are 0.5 mm. The others go right down to 0.1 mm. These ground drills are pricey, but their concentricity is much better than the rolled ones where the shaft diameter = drill diameter.

 

You may also want to look out for carbide drills with a 2.35 mm shaft on ebay, which often come cheaply from the aerospace or printed circuit board industries. They are used and replaced as part of preventive maintenance, but still good enough for our purposes. They run very well, but are rather fragile, so ou have to use them in a drill press.

 

wefalck

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Wefalck's advice about using ex aerospace/printed circuit board industries is good.

 

I would take care about other cheap supplies of drills - they may be rejects. I have had some "unfortunate" experience in this area. The bits did not run true and drilled over size holes. When I examined them under a jewellers lense I found they had their tips ground off centre. They would certainly have ruined work on this small scale.

 

Ian M.

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Such drills can be purchased with either 1 mm or 1.5 mm shafts from jewellers and clockmakers supply houses, or with 2.35 mm shaft from some jewellers or from modellers supply houses. The smallest drills with 2.35 mm shaft though are 0.5 mm. The others go right down to 0.1 mm. These ground drills are pricey, but their concentricity is much better than the rolled ones where the shaft diameter = drill diameter.

 

You may also want to look out for carbide drills with a 2.35 mm shaft on ebay, which often come cheaply from the aerospace or printed circuit board industries. They are used and replaced as part of preventive maintenance, but still good enough for our purposes. They run very well, but are rather fragile, so ou have to use them in a drill press.

 

wefalck

Thank you Wefalck. I tried to find out more on the internet and did not come across any sources. I wonder if you can help me find one, even if it is in Europe. I have a local jeweler and may ask him about those drills.

 

And yes, Ian, those cheap drills are ok for gross work but not for precise detailing. That is why I would like to find at least a few with the thicker shaft on top. 

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Hello Jay, looks like my earlier post didn´t make it to the front end ...

 

These drills I use are from Proxxon/Dremmel accessories department. There are the same kind from the DIY department stores, but they are inferior quality.

 

Daniel

Edited by dafi
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Dafi, Great job!! I think you need a bigger challenge next time!

 

You can buy micro drill bits here, very pricey but they have 'em. 

 

http://www.kyoceramicrotools.com/?gclid=COCqsLrqiZoCFSMSagodpRhJFg

 

There is also Otto Frei in Oakland, CA. Its Micro Mark for watch and jewelry makers.

 

http://www.ofrei.com/

 

Sam

Edited by src
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Thank you guys. I know I will have to buy some of those and follow your suggestions.

 

Meanwhile, I also want to order some collets for my mini lathe. I will be sure to add the 3/32 inch one for the bits Mike R. referred to. 

Speaking of Mini Lathe; any suggestions about collets? Or is this the wrong  place to ask?

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What lathe do you have and are you talking about collets for the tailstock or collets for the headstock ?

 

These days one can get cheap and quite good quality ER-type collets from the usual Chinese sources. However, ER-collets are toolholding collets. Due to their design the material has to be held must pass through the whole length of the collet. If one takes in short lengths of material, the collets will distort, when tightened. Therefore, one cannot use them in the headstock for holding (short) workpieces.

 

wefalck

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  • 1 year later...

Gracias Wefalck. Traté de averiguar más sobre la internet y no encuentro ninguna fuente. Me pregunto si me puede ayudar a encontrar uno, aunque sea en Europa. Tengo un joyero local y puede preguntarle acerca de esos ejercicios.

 

Y sí, Ian, esos ejercicios económicos están bien para el trabajo bruto, pero no para un preciso detalle. Es por eso que me gustaría encontrar al menos unos pocos con el eje más grueso en la parte superior. 

hello modeler 12 just read your comment. on this page, you can get it, free shipping. 
one cabrapente greeting
 
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