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Thunder

HM Naval Cutter Speedy 1828 by Thunder - Model Shipwright - Scale 1:48

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Posted (edited)

Sorry double entry

Edited by lmagna
double entry

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Posted (edited)
On 5/13/2018 at 1:38 AM, Thunder said:

Carronades on slides would be more probable.

 

Or possibly swivel guns

Edited by lmagna

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There are two posts for swivel guns that I have secured the anchor too. You must of read my mind as for some reason I woke up this morning thinking I need to make two small guns to go on them.

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Just like a broken clock, I guess i can be right once in a while. Pure luck that you were looking when I was.:rolleyes:

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I am still amazed at how clean and precise your work is. 

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Clean and precise, I don't think, These are all shaped by eye. Only very rudimentary marking out and measuring.

 

Thank you for thinking it though.

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Posted (edited)

It's either well made or you have your camera well trained to make things look really good. My camera doesn't do that with my stuff.:huh:

Edited by lmagna

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The Mast and bowsprit have now been stepped. The photograph below shows my method of making sure the mast is perfectly upright. I use a small pin vice as a plumb bob and a spirit level across the hull.

 

_1010415.thumb.JPG.69513b5c663dee16a69647c46ad982a5.JPG

 

Photo taken slightly from side so doesn't look like plump is in line with the mast.

 

The booklet with the kit is very comprehensive with regards rigging and the sequence of completion so I thought I would not have to write my usual ' sequence for rigging the masts and yards'. However I hit a problem with the first item. Bowsprit bobstay rigging says to use black thread and then says to take from end of bowsprit, through a block, through fairleads and to pawl bits. My first query was 'tarred' rope through a block! My second was whether cutters had bobstays when they have the provision to bring the bowsprit in and out of the hull. Further investigation seems to indicate that he has somehow combined the bobstay with the Jib Outhauler. Jib outhauler would be in natural thread but rigs as he describes other than passing through a sheave at the end of the bowsprit and going to the jib traveller.

 

Now I am really confused as what is correct for this vessel. 18th century rigs and rigging book does not really help, the Lennarth Petersson book seems to side with me.

 

Casts doubts on the rest of the Bill Shoulder rigging supplied with the kit. 

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Have moved on since last post but before I upload the next stages I wondered if you could give some help regarding the stirrups for the foot ropes on the main yard.

 

I have probably every rigging book you can buy but they all skirt over this minor detail which is how the stirrup is attached to the yard. Does it fall centrally to the yard or, as I previously thought, fix to the front of the yard, go over the top and hang down over the back? This will put them in the best position for standing at the back of the yard facing forwards.  

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Posted (edited)

Very nice build Thunder, a fine cutter.

As far as stirrups are concerned they hang down the back of the yard with three turns taken around the yard and on the real thing the end is nailed to the yard.

 

On models I  use a false splice to secure them to the yard, and also to make the eye splice at the lower end thro’ which the horses run.

 

My  own method of fixing  foot ropes/ stirrups is detailed in my Pegasus log which may assist. (Post 136 page 5)

 

Regards, 

 

B.E.

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Blue Ensign

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Many early models show no bobstay, and I would agree that the jib outhaul passes through a block at the side of the stem.

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Thanks Blue Ensign that is very similar to how I decided to do it. The only difference is that I wanted the stirrup to come down between the turns round the yard. It seems strange that all the books seem to skirt this point, James Lees included, though I must of read up on it some where to know it hung down the back. Strangely the McGowen Victory works seems to have them hanging central to the yard rather than down the rear. Tom would need even longer legs! I usually use wire for the stirrups, drill a hole on the underside, poke it in and glue it, then wrap it round. This is o.k. at smaller scales.

 

Druxey, thanks for replying on the bobstay. I decided, as cutters run the bowsprit in and out, that a bobstay would not be practical and as the travelling outhauler would actually assist moving the bowsprit that I would rig this.

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