Jump to content
Nirvana

Bluenose by Nirvana - Model Shipways - Scale 1:64

Recommended Posts

hmmmm......I have one of those laser levels {sitting in my workshop gathering dust}.   I have one of those line levels as well {the one going across the deck}.  this looks like a very good method per.......I will have to try this out  ;)     thanks for the tip!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, mikiek said:

Shoulda looked at the pic closer. I thought it had something to do with the plastic on the deck. :rolleyes: Something new and revolutionary guaranteed to change our hobby for generations to come.

The plastic on the deck is new to me, to prevent paint on bare wood.....:P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok maybe its time to come clean here. Per & I have been discussing the best way to mark the waterline on a model. My wife has one of these levels that projects a laser line across the room. She uses it when hanging pictures in the house. I borrowed it to try out on my model. As Per describes above you need to get your model level both from side to side and front to back. Now in the case of my Syren, the plans show that she is just a bit lower in the Bow. so being level is not always the right solution.

Once you have your model setup correctly you need a tripod or a similar stool to put the laser on and project the line across the model. I have found this is the best way to project the water line on any model.

 

And for Christmas and for all his help I sent him a laser to use on his Bluenose. The result is what you see above.

 

One suggestion - for those models that the waterline is not even with the deck as the Bluenose is. I used the plans and created a mark on the model with a black marker that was at the bow and where the Waterline ended. I also created a similar mark at the stern. I then adjusted the laser until it touched both marks. Give it a try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No Stand. What I did was use the marker to place a small dot on the hull on the laser line. You might also want to test your line by rotating the model to make sure your line is the same from port to starboard. If you are spray painting as Per was you can just lay masking tape on the laser line. If you go to my Syren log you will see a picture of the whole setup. Model on the bench with the laser on a tripod facing the model.

 

And Per thanks for giving me some space on your log. :)

 

PS Mike that looks like a nice T38 in your avatar. Both Per & I have built one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

As for the laser setup I used my Gitzo tripod with a separate head (Gitzo - Swiss made )  The tripod is heavy duty and not light to carry around.

Will take a picture of it later.

 

Floyd, time for you to change your avatar to your T37!

 

 

Edit:

Picture as promised: look at the weight in the scale window.

P1030851.JPG.dade882d8e87da4cae9b7786b5f11592.JPG

Edited by Nirvana

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Floyd I have built the T37, the T24 Tug and I have their T50 Trimaran on the shelf. Looking forward to seeing that one on the water. Rumor has it there is nothing else like it for speed. Will does a great job with his products at Tippiecanoe. I really like the idea of a nice build that you can do something with when you're done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The lower part is done. The anti-fouling reddish is as I want.

Next was to mask the lower area, so the blackish/blue could be applied.

I am so happy working with the air brush, the out-come is so much better than a regular brush.

Following two pictures is showing the somewhat result, this as the port has been painted and sanded and the starboard is partly painted.

5a40606457069_portblackandblue.JPG.7e8e30706634388c0ff8660e76948c8d.JPG

5a406007e93b2_starboardblack-bluepaint.JPG.34941633186aaddf8d610d01ebcf8abb.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad the air brush is working out for you. One suggestion there - get yourself some spare parts. The needles can get bent in a heartbeat and are useless after that. Depending on the brand parts can be a long time coming. Other parts - that little crown looking thing that screws on the tip, a brush cleaning set, inline moisture remover.

 

Don't know if you have had to take it apart yet but when you do, count every screw turn and write it down. Great as they are, they can be very finicky when not adjusted just right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I had the first coat of the black/blue coating over the hull, but I don't fancy it to much.

It has more of a blue/green tone, so I am to experiment of mixing to create the tone I like.

P1030859.JPG.86bce30fd7daa659976c09fe34859a01.JPG

Again, always write down the rations so I will remember for future use.

I will also create my own color chart. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brian, 

Sure you can go that direction you are mentioned, but in the instructions it's kind of easily explained.

Re-read that section and look at Bluenose build and you will see.

 

However, I placed the "fake" stanchions a equal distance in-between the bulkheads and then cut the bulkheads and put in more "fakes", if you doing this properly and let the glue set the planking will be easy.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brian, 

Here we go, 

1: Clamp a piece of plank approx. 6-8" covering three bulkhead. See picture: Three red arrow line.

5a41c8eccc6a5_Bulkheadstanchion.JPG.5cd306d59329c6ba8c82d208ae8acd70.JPG

 

Then insert the fake stanchions, see green line. These are to be even spaced between bulkheads.

There are three stanchions between each bulkhead.

 

5a41c9b6ba20e_fakestanchion.JPG.5cefd8fbd1e758e612ebe046d0ed4912.JPG

Now continue this procedure all the way, starboard and port side.

There are some cutting involved to get them done.

5a41caa923fc4_morestanchions.JPG.446b6cb2223e01185f084e4b9f6148d3.JPG

 

Once this is done, cut the bulkhead tops off.

I have an extremely fine-tooth saw (razor blade size) which I used for this.

 

saw.thumb.JPG.f02751db8657415ad2a67c18803ffb5e.JPG5a41cc034affd_cutaway.JPG.e0107a01ccf1e86110ac17074f95e677.JPG

Insert the fake stanchions where you cut the bulkheads out.

Work the stem and stern area before any waist planking is done.

As for the scuppers, I omitted them as they are so small.

Hope this explained how I did mine. I wouldn't say my way is the perfect one, I think we all are re-thinking the "wheel" with each build of any ship.

 

 

Edited by Nirvana

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a quick comment on the scuppers. This was an idea from another builder many years ago. I agree it is hard but the result was impressive. Look at some of the other logs on this site.

 

PS I skipped it too. This was my first completed Build.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I did go with scuppers anyway.

I created a simple jigg for this purpose as the waist is already there. 

At least they will be noticeable from the outside.

The holes in the wider part are slightly wider than the stanchions.

5a443531a1629_scupperjigg2.JPG.e40694d7e35d29935d64ee6858977070.JPG5a44353516539_scupperjigg.JPG.a80119d7102255a4571a4da0e8e23a58.JPG 

This needle is not being used when doing the holes only to hold the jigg in place for photo session.

5a44353305edf_scupperjigg3.JPG.34428137478f4794c35b68a5745f35b4.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...