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Medway Longboat 1742 -1/2" scale - by Jeff


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  • 2 weeks later...

So on with the build. This is Plan A and Plan B. Plan A is to use the lap joint parts. Unfortunately, this is the one thing I struggle with the most; final shaping or removing material from parts without causing serious problems like rounded edges, rounded surfaces, changing the shape, etc... Its the one reason I haven't been able to do a scratch build. So I need to figure out what method to use and take my sweet time doing it. If all else fails, Plan B is the other parts provided.

 

On another note, I like that the tabs holding the parts on are nice and small. Its very easy to remove the parts and clean up the tab remnants. Seems like most kits have a giant chunk of wood in multiple places holding the parts on.

 

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I can see an advantage to a group build like this. Hopefully, more experienced builders will respond with ways that you can successfully fit the lap joint. I'm new at this model boat building, but if I was doing it, I'd mill the joint to a good fit with my Sherline Mill............not an option for most folks. If you have some material 1/2 the thickness of the keel, you could put that on each side of the lap, to support a sanding stick, and sand down to that. That would keep the edges from rounding over. I bet there's lot's of other ways that neither of us know about.

 

Jim

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Jeff,

 

Take your time and you will be OK.  I realized early on that the sanding sticks that I was using (flexible nail files) were rounding off the edges.  I cut some 1/8" plywood into strips and made my own sanding sticks using sandpaper and rubber cement.  The hard plywood kept the edges from being the rounded off.  I also used a chisel to remove a lot of wood.  I constantly measured my lap joints to make sure that I did not remove too much wood.  Also, you have to keep the work area clean as the yellow cedar attracts the laser burn dust.  I also taped a paper towel to my work area to serve as a small cushion as the yellow cedar is soft.  Good luck, you will do OK.

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I am looking forward to getting started so I can try using a method Kurt VanDam suggested during one of the NRG Conference technical sessions.  Using an iGaging multi-use huzzywutchet (purchased for a mere $19 on Amazon) I plan to measure the thickness of the piece to be joined, cut it in half to determine the depth of the cut.  "What is so new about that?" you might ask.  I will then use the huzzywutchet to set my Byrnes-saw blade to the correct height and mill away.  (Don't tell Kurt I might be doing this free-hand.)  I will try it out on a test piece first.

 

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Jeff,

I have had the same problems you describe. I used an exact with a sharp #11 blade and a file. The key for me was to take a little off with the blade, file it smooth, and repeat until I removed enough material. I took my time and it came out better than I expected. Having a plan B really took the pressure off. I knew that if I screwed it up I would still be able to complete the project. Have fun!!!

v/r,

Rob

Edited by rjones726
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Thanks for all the suggestions and supporting comments, I do appreciate it. They are all good methods. I checked out the current build logs and saw some great ideas there like the digital caliper measurement. I did purchase a sherline mill but have no clue how to use it yet. I am considering that as an option. I also have the byrnes saw so I need to take a look at the huzzywuchet. I think the key to using the mill and the saw (and any other method) would be patience and practice before attacking the actual piece.

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Another successful method is to glue two pieces of scrap hard wood onto a baseboard.  These flat pieces should be about 1" wide and half the thickness of the parts being cut.  Position them about 1" apart so you slide the keel pieces between them.  These will act as depth gauges and a stop for your chisels.  Then just start chiseling and sanding.  This will prevent rounded edges if the scrap pieces are up against the keel.

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1 hour ago, Chuck said:

Another successful method is to glue two pieces of scrap hard wood onto a baseboard.  These flat pieces should be about 1" wide and half the thickness of the parts being cut.  Position them about 1" apart so you slide the keel pieces between them.  These will act as depth gauges and a stop for your chisels.  Then just start chiseling and sanding.  This will prevent rounded edges if the scrap pieces are up against the keel.

Makes sense. Thanks Chuck.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello everyone. I finally got over my fear of causing major damage and got the keel assembled.

 

I used a caliper to measure the thickness of the keel and divided by two to hit the halfway mark.  After much practicing on scrap pieces I used the byrnes saw to reduce the thickness to slightly above the halfway measurement. You have to go very slow using the saw or it will cause splintering of the wood. I wasn't able to remove all the material with the byrnes saw since we're not dealing with perfect 90 degree angles so I had to remove some material by hand. I got as close as I could to the edges and then used a number 10 curved exacto blade for chiseling away material. I'm not comfortable using the number 11 blades because I can't seem to control them as well. I did the final sanding with emery boards. I also assembled the other keel option just for the fun of it. Both keels are exactly the same length when assembled so I must have done something right. I'll go ahead and pat myself on the back and move on to removing some char and add the bolts. I also test fitted the inner parts and they fit nearly perfectly. Here is the result:

 

 

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7 minutes ago, Chuck said:

They both look great.  The joints are nice and crisp.  You should be very happy with those results.  I also hope this little project gets your modeling juices flowing again.

I think it will. I feel pretty excited about this build.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Alright, finally got the keel finished. I just pretty much followed along with the instructions. I installed the simulated bolts and sanded off the laser char.

 

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After that, I ended up gluing the two inner keel pieces together first and then glued them to the keel. I made sure I had a nice flat surface and aligned the bottom edges along a angle block. It worked out nice.

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No adjustments were needed for the inner keel pieces, everything fit perfectly, no wiggle room on either end. I used the little 1/32 jigs as seen in other build logs to make sure I had the 1/32 rabbet.

 

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I gave it a coat of wipe-on poly and on to the next step.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi all. Just a quick update and a question. I've built all the frames and dry fit everything together. I put the packing tape on the frames for support also. You may notice that I haven't attached the transom yet. I'm going to glue it on while everything is dry fit together on the build board. I thought it would be easier to get it properly aligned and perpendicular to the hull.

 

My question is on the small strip of wood at the top of the frames. Is this added to all frames?

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm back at the workbench after a short holiday break. I glued the aft 10 frames to the keel after some prep work and a few dry runs. I went ahead and applied the glue and after several terrifying moments of manipulating and adjusting the frames everything settled into place. I used the front most frame to help me align the keel squarely to the frames. Now I move onto the front frames.

 

 

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I've finally completed the front frame section and glued the frames to the keel. I ended up clamping the front section down to keep it from moving around when I lowered the keel over the frames. After that, I clamped the rear section as well. I just wanted to be sure I didn't bump something and knock everything out of alignment before the glue dried. Once the glue sets I'll tape the build board sections together and then add on the transom. I still need to glue the little piece at the top of the front and rear frames before I start to fair the hull.

 

 

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I got the small pieces of planking glued to the frames and finally glued the transom on. The picture shows how I did that. The pieces of wood were used to prop the transom up after it was glued. Once the glue was applied I used a ruler to align it with the rear most frame and to makes sure it was level. On to fairing.

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Just a quick update. I finished fairing the hull and I'm currently working on tick strips to mark the lines for planking, I had one oops while fairing which was I took a little too much off at the lower part of the transom. Not paying attention 😒. I'll probably need to use a little filler after the planking is done.

 

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I'm currently making some tick strips to mark off the hull. This is my tick strip maker.

 

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