Jump to content

Mayflower by Stuntflyer (Mike) - Model Shipways - 5/32" Scale


Recommended Posts

Hello everyone,

 

Welcome to my build log of the Model Shipways "Mayflower". For those who have been following my build of the US Brig Syren, I have decided not to build it at this time. These two models require a similar level of experience yet have their own set of challenges. I have decided to build the Mayflower for those challenges that I feel are more to my level of experience. Chuck has done a superb job with the Mayflower instructions and there are some excellent build logs here on MSW. I would appreciate any help or suggestions that you might have as I move along.

 

Clamp setup for first bulkhead: Hours after removing the bulkhead former from the sheet I noticed that it was curved but not warped. After all the bulkheads are glued in place I will attempt to straighten the former.

 

post-8351-0-64311200-1414191957_thumb.jpg

 

● Clamp setup for remaining bulkheads:

 

post-8351-0-46862800-1414192146_thumb.jpg

 

Bulkheads and filler pieces glued into the bulkhead former: The initial fit was generally tight. When fitting the bullheads I allowed for the PVA glue swelling the wood by sanding in a very small amount of bulkhead movement past 90° fore and aft.

 

post-8351-0-27591600-1414192336_thumb.jpg

 

post-8351-0-31749200-1414193469_thumb.jpg

 

Curved bulkhead former before straightening:

 

post-8351-0-92524600-1414193494_thumb.jpg

 

Straightening was achieved aft of bulkhead "A" in three steps.

 

1. Blocks were inserted between the formers A&B and C&D to prevent this area of the hull from moving while attaching the "dummy cannon support strips".

 

2. These support strips were used to straighten 90% of the curve by pulling the hull straight and pinning the strips in place before gluing.

 

3. Blocks were inserted between bulkheads 3 and 3b in order to correct the remaining curve in this area.

 

 

post-8351-0-03874500-1414201672_thumb.jpg

 

Straightened hull

 

post-8351-0-37457700-1414193833_thumb.jpg

 

Eye bolt: This was formed using a 1/8" dowel and then compressing its shape into an oval. Photo shows eye bolt temporarily in place before priming and painting the inside of the two "fore mast Fillers" and eye bolt black with Badger 16-01 Engine Black. Testors Dull coat was used to flatten the finish.

 

post-8351-0-61777200-1414196112_thumb.jpg

 

Gun Port Framing: I will be using boxwood as the primary wood for the model. Although the gun port framing will not be seen I wanted to see what it was like to work with. No complaints at all and I really like getting clean crisp edges easily. After the bottom gun port frame was glued into place a 1/4" balsa sheet, of a consistent thickness, was cut into small filler pieces to maintain an equal distance between the two gun port frames while the top frames were being glued. Later, this greatly eased the process of making the small vertical pieces for the ports. I have no idea why the small block between C&D was there so I removed it after the photo was taken.

 

post-8351-0-36864400-1414197871_thumb.jpg

 

post-8351-0-03824300-1414197896_thumb.jpg

 

I made a test piece for the vertical frames to see if the angles were similar for both the top and bottom. It turns out that they were at approximately 10.5°. All I had to do was cut one angle with the help of the disk sander and then measure 1/4" and cut the other in parallel. Very little sanding was needed to achieve a nice fit. Were the gun ports angle upwards at the bow and stern a slight angle was sanded in the opposing direction to account for the tilt of the vertical strip.

 

post-8351-0-63885300-1414198830_thumb.jpg

 

post-8351-0-00779000-1414198831_thumb.jpg

 

After the stern pieces XX, YY and ZZ were glued in, the hull was faired and the four false decks were glued into position. Once dry they were later faired into the hull shape.

 

post-8351-0-21954700-1414200182_thumb.jpg

 

post-8351-0-03012400-1414336369_thumb.jpg

 

post-8351-0-09198100-1414200574_thumb.jpg

Edited by Dan Vadas
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Planking the Counter: After test fitting the first layer of planking using a 1/8" x 1/6" basswood strip I could see that it was too thin and would not allow the second layer to sit flush with bulkhead "ZZ". The fix was to place a 1/32" balsa shim below the first layer of planking. The shims were glued to the stern frames that were added earlier.

 

post-8351-0-54755200-1414516080_thumb.jpg

 

The second layer was done in boxwood.

 

post-8351-0-10481100-1414517288_thumb.jpg

Edited by Stuntflyer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Marking the initial plank position with the bulwark template gave me a better idea of where the upper plank runs would be located. Some additional fairing of the hull was needed in order to get the planks running without dips and rises. Once one side of the hull was faired I made bulkhead profile templates from card stock. Holding the card templates up against a window I was able to trace the profiles onto the other side of the card stock. I used these tracings to match the bulkhead profiles from the faired side. Once both sides were symmetrical I checked the plank run once more to confirmed that all was good for attaching the 2 initial planks.

 

Setting Initial planks: The bulwark template was used to mark the bulkheads for the location of the initial planks before they were glued into place. For these 2 planks I found it easier to form its shape by soaking in water for 5 minutes and clamping them to the hull. I used a hair dryer on its high setting to dry them.

 

The photos below show the plank run along the bulwark template and then with the template removed.

 

post-8351-0-59898600-1414692670_thumb.jpg

 

post-8351-0-91018300-1414692661_thumb.jpg

Edited by Stuntflyer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

First planking layer (part 1): 6 Planks are now in place and the gun ports are shaped.

 

The individual planks were made from one continuous length. I used scrap laser cut sheet to create the shape for the sharp curve of the bow. I also added a balsa filler block to help when bending the plank around the bow.

 

post-8351-0-67685400-1415158658_thumb.jpg

 

Before shaping the gun ports I sanded the planking with 180 grit, being very careful not to sand too close to the top edge of the initial plank or too close to the bottom edge of the last plank. My reasoning was that since additional planks would be added above and below I would leave these 2 planks at full thickness to be sanded later after all the planks are in.

 

post-8351-0-60450800-1415160519_thumb.jpg

Edited by Stuntflyer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mike after seeing your work on the longboat I had to pull up and watch this, it looks outstanding so far!  Are you spilling the planks from larger piece of wood or plank bending?  Sorry it it should be obvious which route you're going with it :)  I'm new enough to the hobby that it's sometimes hard for me to tell what procedure the builder is using.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm about to start the lower hull starting with the garboard plank. I'm not clear as to the thickness of this plank where it meets the rabbet. Since the rabbet is already 3/32" if the garboard plank remains at 1/16" then the overall thickness at the stern once both sides are completed will be 7/32" . Is this correct? Advice needed. Thanks!

 

Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Basically you should taper the bulkhead former a bit more than 3/32' thick at the stern just to be safe.   This was my first kit design trying out the rabbet strip concept. From the bearding line to the rabbet strip it should really be a gradual tapering to 1/16" thick.  But after the hull is planked it will be a bit thicker than the stern post,  so yes,  you will need to gradually sand the hull planking along the stern post so it sits flush with the stern post (1/8" wide).   Because the planking is 1/16"' thick....its really too thick for this scale.  So gradually sanding the finished planking toward the stern post to make it flush will be required.  It only need to be done really at the lower corner of the stern post where the keel meets it.   

 

Because the original kit supplied basswood at 1/32" thick couldnt be used as planking material...its real crap and would literally fall apart.  I had to substitute thicker 1/16" basswood strips.  This means it will stand proud of the stern post and keel by 1/32"

 

This extra thickness needs to be gradually knocked down to sit flush against the 1/8" wide stern post and keel after you finish planking the hull and add them..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First planking layer (part 2): Before adding the garboard planks I did as Chuck advised and thinned the rabbet down to 1/16" in the area where the stern post will go.

 

The width across the rabbet is too wide where the planks twist and some additional sanding is needed.

 

post-8351-0-53886000-1415309968_thumb.jpg

 

The planks will be sanded down gradually to around 1/32" to blend in where the stern post will be located.

 

post-8351-0-75905200-1415375250_thumb.jpg

Edited by Stuntflyer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

The first layer hull planking is completed on one side with 2 more planks remaining on the other. I was hoping to finish both sides before my leaving on a week's vacation but rushing things is not an option. The completed side has been sanded with 120 grit to within 90% of where I want it. I still need to taper the planking at the stern to 1/8" where it meets the sternpost. Right now it's 1/16" too wide overall.

 

I have to say that the experience so far has been somewhat of an eye opener. I was hoping that my planking the Longboat would have made things a lot easier, but new challenges were presented. The biggest challenge was having to plank a more rounded bow using 1/16" x 1/8" basswood strips. If not careful, this wood is sure to crease, splinter, crush or lose an edge. Although it was too late to turn back at the time, Chuck mentioned that instead of using 1/8" planks in the lower hull I could have used 5/32" planks tapered to 1/8" near bulkhead "0". This would have avoided the use of stealers altogether.

 

post-8351-0-00962200-1416671398_thumb.jpg

Edited by Stuntflyer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

While writing my last post I was contemplating the idea of going to a second layer planking below the lower whales using boxwood and leaving it a natural wood color. I have decided against this and will simply paint the first layer planking in that area white (tallow).

Edited by Stuntflyer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

After completing the first layer planking I used some Elmers wood filler to fill small cracks and then applied a coat of primer as a color indicator for final sanding of the hull. At first I tried using the Model Master Acrylic White Primer #4622 but it wasn't opaque enough so I switched to their gray #4680.

 

post-8351-0-96640000-1417833710_thumb.jpg

Edited by Stuntflyer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone for your comments and likes.

 

When I was building airplanes, due to the filler being applied over silkspan, it was common practice to leave some filler the surface since it was not a good idea to sand through the silkspan. I started with the same approach as you can see from the previous post. I later realized that since the primer was applied directly to the wood that I could sand the hull a lot more to achieve a smooth contour while using the primer as an indicator of high and low spots. At first I was afraid of sanding through the wood, especially at the bow and stern, but there was plenty of material and no need to worry.

 

post-8351-0-06745000-1417969888_thumb.jpg

Edited by Stuntflyer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Forecastle Deck:

 

I started the deck planking today using a #2b pencil to simulate the tarred seams. All of the deck planking will be done using boxwood. I applied a coat of Wipe-On Poly to bring out the color.

 

post-8351-0-92091500-1418096780_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

Edited by Stuntflyer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Turns out I made the two hatches the wrong size.  The forecastle false deck has squares marked on it for the placement of these hatches. Instead of adding the 1/16" square strips outside of these markings I placed them inside. My thinking was that the markings represented the overall size. Wrong! Chuck's watchful eye caught the mistake.

 

Before and after

 

post-8351-0-07413000-1418335082_thumb.jpg

 

post-8351-0-36268000-1418335082_thumb.jpg

Edited by Stuntflyer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Poop Bulkhead: A few things have made me rethink my approach to the remaining deck planking. The boxwood strips I received vary in thickness between .031"-.050". I think it would be difficult to sand the planks flat without damaging the coamings that are supposed to be glued to the main deck beforehand. Also, the kit supplied gratings do not have a tight fit when assembled and the holes are too large according to the plans. I'm working on a solution for both and will post the results hopefully soon. Meanwhile here is a photo of the Poop Bulkhead. I made a photocopy of the diamond pattern shown in the manual and used the kit supplied 1/16" white tape around the edge, with half its width showing. I left some room for the planking to run under the door as well.

 

post-8351-0-09598000-1419176537_thumb.jpg

Edited by Stuntflyer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...