Jump to content

Welcome to Model Ship World
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

A Lorch Micro-Mill that never was ...


  • Please log in to reply
91 replies to this topic

#21
Nirvana

Nirvana
  • Members
  • 1,820 posts
  • LocationConnell, WA

Okay, not that we are supposed to used cursing words in this forum.

but what the $#@$#&*%$ have I missed!

These machines are absolutely crazy!

What is the pricetag of the Micro Mill?

Not that I can afford a regular one as of today, but I am curious. Must be in the price of an Aston Martin Db5 Vintage


  • mtaylor, WackoWolf and AntonyUK like this

Respectfully

 

Per aka Dr. Per

 

Ship modeling is a long lesson in patience - Me

It's better to get something done later than never

 

Denial is futile, MSW is here to stay.

 

 Therapy for Shipaholics

 

Finished: T37, BB Marie Jeanne - located on a shelf in Sweden

Current: America by Constructo, Harley almost a Harvey , 18th Century Longboat, Solö Ruff

National Research Guild Member - 'Taint a hobby if you gotta hurry


#22
wefalck

wefalck
  • Members
  • 760 posts
  • LocationParis, France

Per, as it never was, the mill doesn't have a price-tag ;)  ... unless you were indeed prepared to pay me at my commercial rates, which means that you would have to trade-in a decent car, may not quite an Aston Martin (but I would gladly exchange it for the mill, BTW) B)

 

***********************************

 

For the dial on the y-slide I had a piece of 21 mm diameter brass to hand. This was faced in the 3-jaw-chuck, drilled and reamed for the 5 mm spindle, and then bored out to fit over the spindle bearing-plate.

 

MF-43.jpg

Preparing the blank for the dial

 

The blank was the mounted on an arbor with a 5 mm stem so that I could turn the outside shape. At one end there is the notorious convex knurled ring. For this, a ring of 1.2 mm width and 1 mm height was left standing with edges slightly chamfered.

 

MF-44.jpg

Turning the blank for the dial

 

For the next machining step the knurling tool with the concave knurl was mounted to the cross-slide. The knurling tool was fed slowly into the slowly rotating blank. It catches quite quickly at the edges and the pattern evolves fast. As expected, the processes is both, a cutting as well as a shaping one – the relatively soft being squeezed into the indentations of the knurling wheel. While generously lubricating with WD40 the knurl was fed into the faster rotating blank until the pattern had developed fully.

 

MF-45.jpg

Knurling the dial

 

To be continued ...


  • mtaylor, WackoWolf, Dubz and 10 others like this

wefalck

 

panta rhei - Everything is in flux

 

 

M-et-M-72.jpg  Banner-AKHS-72.jpg  Banner-AAMM-72.jpg  ImagoOrbis-72.jpg

#23
BANYAN

BANYAN
  • SPECIAL CONTRIBUTOR
  • 1,961 posts
  • LocationMelbourne, Victoria

Another tantalising update Eberhardt - I have stocked up on the tissues so ready for the main installments ;) :)

 

That knurling tool does a great job.

 

cheers

 

Pat


  • mtaylor and WackoWolf like this

If at first you do not suceed, try, and then try again!
Current build: HMCSS Victoria (Scratch) - underway

Next builds:    HMAS Vampire (3D printed resin 1:350)

Built:                Battle Station (Scratch)

                         HM Bark Endeavour 1768 (1:64)


#24
wefalck

wefalck
  • Members
  • 760 posts
  • LocationParis, France

Thanks, Pat. I was actually surprised myself, that it turned out so well ;)


  • mtaylor and WackoWolf like this

wefalck

 

panta rhei - Everything is in flux

 

 

M-et-M-72.jpg  Banner-AKHS-72.jpg  Banner-AAMM-72.jpg  ImagoOrbis-72.jpg

#25
wefalck

wefalck
  • Members
  • 760 posts
  • LocationParis, France

The blank on its arbor was then transfered to the dividing apparatus on the milling machine for engraving the dial. For this a 15° engraving bit was used. in the same set-up the hole for the friction brake of the dial was pre-drilled.

 

MF-47.jpg

Set-up for engraving the dial

 

MF-48.jpg

Engraving the dial

 

The numbers were stamped in a make-shift set-up in a vice. In order to ensure that the number-stamps were applied exactly radially a purpuse-made guide-block was used.

wja-scalestamping.jpg

Set-up for stamping the dial

 

Finally, the dial was mounted back on the arbor and the burrs from engraving and stamping cleaned up with a couple of light cuts in the lathe.

 

MF-50.jpg

Cleaning up the engraved and stamped dial

 

The two parts were separated on the lathe with a jewelers saw substituting for a parting tool. The dial then was degreased and the engravings laid out in black enamel paint. After the generously applied paint had dried, the dial was cleaned up with very fine wet-and-dry sanding paper.

 

MF-52.jpg

Painting the dial

 

To be continued ...


  • mtaylor, WackoWolf, BANYAN and 8 others like this

wefalck

 

panta rhei - Everything is in flux

 

 

M-et-M-72.jpg  Banner-AKHS-72.jpg  Banner-AAMM-72.jpg  ImagoOrbis-72.jpg

#26
Nirvana

Nirvana
  • Members
  • 1,820 posts
  • LocationConnell, WA
Pure artistic, I have no words on how to compliment you for this amazing tool build. Beautiful!
  • mtaylor, WackoWolf and donrobinson like this

Respectfully

 

Per aka Dr. Per

 

Ship modeling is a long lesson in patience - Me

It's better to get something done later than never

 

Denial is futile, MSW is here to stay.

 

 Therapy for Shipaholics

 

Finished: T37, BB Marie Jeanne - located on a shelf in Sweden

Current: America by Constructo, Harley almost a Harvey , 18th Century Longboat, Solö Ruff

National Research Guild Member - 'Taint a hobby if you gotta hurry


#27
druxey

druxey
  • Members
  • 4,779 posts
  • LocationNiagara on the Lake, Ontario, Canada

Beautifully machined, Wefalck!


  • mtaylor, WackoWolf and PeteB like this

#28
wefalck

wefalck
  • Members
  • 760 posts
  • LocationParis, France

Now, with the summer holidays behind me, I am back in the fora and in the workshop :)  However, first a little postscript on things that were completed before the vacations:

 

A couple of pictures that show the different components of the y-axis spindle. Also visible on the first picture are the parts of the friction brake for the dial, short piece of acrylic rod that is pressed down on the spindle with a set-screw. Tightening or loosing the screw allows to adjust the friction.

 

MF-53.jpg

The parts of the y-axis spindle

 

MF-54.jpg

Spindle assembled

 

MF-55.jpg

Spindle in its working place

 

To be continued ...


Edited by wefalck, 05 September 2016 - 03:23 PM.

  • trippwj, mtaylor, WackoWolf and 10 others like this

wefalck

 

panta rhei - Everything is in flux

 

 

M-et-M-72.jpg  Banner-AKHS-72.jpg  Banner-AAMM-72.jpg  ImagoOrbis-72.jpg

#29
druxey

druxey
  • Members
  • 4,779 posts
  • LocationNiagara on the Lake, Ontario, Canada

Welcome back, wefalck!


  • mtaylor and WackoWolf like this

#30
BANYAN

BANYAN
  • SPECIAL CONTRIBUTOR
  • 1,961 posts
  • LocationMelbourne, Victoria

Hope you enjoyed the holiday mate; welcome back.

 

cheers

 

Pat


  • mtaylor and WackoWolf like this

If at first you do not suceed, try, and then try again!
Current build: HMCSS Victoria (Scratch) - underway

Next builds:    HMAS Vampire (3D printed resin 1:350)

Built:                Battle Station (Scratch)

                         HM Bark Endeavour 1768 (1:64)


#31
wefalck

wefalck
  • Members
  • 760 posts
  • LocationParis, France

Was kind of working holiday: had to work on finishing off the decoration and furnishing of our part-time home in Spain - putting in/up wardrobes, building a mock fire-place (unfotunately, we can't have real one there), etc.; jumping up and down the ladder at around 30°C made me loose some 4 kg in weight - feeling a lot fitter than before the holidays - but have been to the beach only once ... grilling on the beach in the August heat is for German and British tourists only anyway ;)

 

************************************

 

The milling spindle will be secured in its place between the two brackets by a lever-actuated excentric bolt that pushes it down. I found a rough excentric bolt in my scrap-box of odd lathe parts, but it would have been as easy to start from scratch. The excentric was worked over holding the bolt in the 3-jaw-chuck with a brass-shim to give the off-set.

 

MF-56.jpg

Rough and ready method for excentric turning

 

The head was turned with the help of the shop-made radius-turning tool (which I originally made to be able to turn miniature door-knobs and the likes). The tool-bit diameter was chosen to match the neck and shoulder of the bolt. The turning operation was followed by smoothing with wet-and-dry paper and steel-wool of various grades. Finally, it was polished with polishing paste. The pictures below show the various steps of this machining process:

 

MF-57.jpg

 

MF-58.jpg

 

MF-59.jpg

 

MF-60.jpg

 

MF-62.jpg

 

To be continued ...


  • mtaylor, WackoWolf, cristikc and 12 others like this

wefalck

 

panta rhei - Everything is in flux

 

 

M-et-M-72.jpg  Banner-AKHS-72.jpg  Banner-AAMM-72.jpg  ImagoOrbis-72.jpg

#32
WackoWolf

WackoWolf
  • Members
  • 2,734 posts
  • LocationRhode Island

You are a true Master and I doubt anyone would say different. If they do let me know, I got this nickname for a reason LOL. Keep the post and beautiful pictures coming. Thank you for sharing this with all of us,


  • mtaylor, Nirvana and PeteB like this
Wacko
Joe :D

Go MSW :) :)

#33
Nirvana

Nirvana
  • Members
  • 1,820 posts
  • LocationConnell, WA

Weflack,

Are you creating this little mill from plans or is this just all from plans in your head?

I am so impressed!


  • mtaylor and Jack12477 like this

Respectfully

 

Per aka Dr. Per

 

Ship modeling is a long lesson in patience - Me

It's better to get something done later than never

 

Denial is futile, MSW is here to stay.

 

 Therapy for Shipaholics

 

Finished: T37, BB Marie Jeanne - located on a shelf in Sweden

Current: America by Constructo, Harley almost a Harvey , 18th Century Longboat, Solö Ruff

National Research Guild Member - 'Taint a hobby if you gotta hurry


#34
wefalck

wefalck
  • Members
  • 760 posts
  • LocationParis, France

Thanks for the praise :rolleyes:

 

At a matter of fact, it is all in my head. These days I don't even make working drawings :o  Sometimes I make dimensioned sketches for machining, literally on the back of envelopes, in order make sure that what I imagined actually works out. Most of the times things seem to come out as I imagined them. Not alway though :(  Just struggeling with the motor mount now, as my original idea would create a too long lever, when clearing various parts of the mill, with the risk of amplifying vibrations ... have to re-think it.


  • mtaylor, WackoWolf, druxey and 3 others like this

wefalck

 

panta rhei - Everything is in flux

 

 

M-et-M-72.jpg  Banner-AKHS-72.jpg  Banner-AAMM-72.jpg  ImagoOrbis-72.jpg

#35
Nirvana

Nirvana
  • Members
  • 1,820 posts
  • LocationConnell, WA
Now, that makes the mill even more impressive!
  • mtaylor, WackoWolf, Jack12477 and 1 other like this

Respectfully

 

Per aka Dr. Per

 

Ship modeling is a long lesson in patience - Me

It's better to get something done later than never

 

Denial is futile, MSW is here to stay.

 

 Therapy for Shipaholics

 

Finished: T37, BB Marie Jeanne - located on a shelf in Sweden

Current: America by Constructo, Harley almost a Harvey , 18th Century Longboat, Solö Ruff

National Research Guild Member - 'Taint a hobby if you gotta hurry


#36
wefalck

wefalck
  • Members
  • 760 posts
  • LocationParis, France

I should perhaps add that I let myself be guided in the desgin of the various bits and pieces by what was practice for these machines. Surprisingly, since the 1880s all manufacturers seem to have followed largely the same designs with only small variations in detail. For new parts I try to imagine how these manufacturers would have made them. However, as I have no possibility to have iron castings made, I have to fabricate parts.


  • mtaylor, WackoWolf, druxey and 1 other like this

wefalck

 

panta rhei - Everything is in flux

 

 

M-et-M-72.jpg  Banner-AKHS-72.jpg  Banner-AAMM-72.jpg  ImagoOrbis-72.jpg

#37
druxey

druxey
  • Members
  • 4,779 posts
  • LocationNiagara on the Lake, Ontario, Canada

Interesting radius turning set-up, wefalck. I've only seen the ones that work in the horizontal plane, mounted in place of a tailstock. Your version makes good sense!


  • mtaylor and WackoWolf like this

#38
wefalck

wefalck
  • Members
  • 760 posts
  • LocationParis, France

A radius-turning tool with a vertical axis would be difficult to implement on a watchmakers lathe, as the clearance over the top-slide is only 7 mm ! So you would need to somehow construct a cantilever from which the turning point would be suspended, or the maximum diameter you can work on would be about 10 mm.

Not sure anymore, whether this was my own inspiration or whether I saw it somewhere in a picture, but I had the idea to use a boring-head, which has a built-in micrometer dial, to change the radius.

I also wanted to be able to turn spherical surfaces for which the centre is not necessarily in the axis of the lathe. Therefore, I built the tool around the quick-change tool-post. Essentially, I built a miniature boring-head and an insert for the QCTP with a horizontal bore, into which the shaft of the boring-tool can be inserted.

The design is not perfect. I should have better control of the end-play in the QCTP and started to work on a system of cone-bearings, but did not finish this.

For the relatively big jobs presented here it works well enough, but when it comes to turning door-knobs and the likes with 0.5 mm diameter, I need to have a better control on the play in the tool.


  • mtaylor, WackoWolf, druxey and 1 other like this

wefalck

 

panta rhei - Everything is in flux

 

 

M-et-M-72.jpg  Banner-AKHS-72.jpg  Banner-AAMM-72.jpg  ImagoOrbis-72.jpg

#39
wefalck

wefalck
  • Members
  • 760 posts
  • LocationParis, France

To to continue: The ball-end lever for the locking bolt was fashioned from a short piece of steel in several steps: first the stem that will be a push-fit in a hole of the bolt was turned;

 

MF-63.jpg

 

chucking the material with this stem, then the main part of the lever was turned conical, leaving a part cylindrical for the ball-head;

 

MF-65.jpg

 

the conical part was given a waist using the free-hand turning rest;

 

MF-67.jpg

 

and finally the ball-head was formed using the radius-turning tool.

 

MF-69.jpg

 

MF-71.jpg

 

The tool-bit in this case was a 2 mm HSS-bit in a special holder that allows to form a sphere with a sharp edge at the stem.

 

MF-72.jpg

The finished ball-lever

 

MF-73.jpg

Ball-lever actuated locking pin in place

 

To be continued ....


  • mtaylor, WackoWolf, BANYAN and 9 others like this

wefalck

 

panta rhei - Everything is in flux

 

 

M-et-M-72.jpg  Banner-AKHS-72.jpg  Banner-AAMM-72.jpg  ImagoOrbis-72.jpg

#40
druxey

druxey
  • Members
  • 4,779 posts
  • LocationNiagara on the Lake, Ontario, Canada

Very elegant!


  • mtaylor and WackoWolf like this




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Welcome GUEST to the Model Ship World Community.
Please LOGIN or REGISTER to use all of our feautures.