achuck49

How to chisel a solid hull boat

Ahoy!

When working on solid hull boats such as the MS Phantom or Sultana not all areas can be shaped with a dremil or sandpaper.  So how does one use a chisel to trim that area between fore and aft decks or thin the thick bow portion. The aft part of the deck should be flat but it slopes upward and that portion of the bullwork needs to be cleaner.

 

How to position the hull for chiseling, how does one do this type of work.

 

Chuck A

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58f577af6851c_2017-04-1721_15_42.thumb.jpg.175c8a99bab6fdcf0b4902685803e5ed.jpg

I hope you can see from the photos there are areas that a Dremel cannot handle. The bow needs to be thined, how?

 

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This is between decks. I believe the distance between decks is 2mm.

 

There is an area at the end of hull that requires the same type of work. (Photo will not upload)

 

I hope that I am clear inow my request for knowledge. 

 

Chuck A

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Chuck some where I saw a mini plane that has the cutting knife on the side rather then on the bottom, so far I can't find one, maybe one of the tool guru members will help out.

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I think it's a case of removing material slowly with an exacto knife. Dremels are great but they take off material very fast and an exacto is slow but accurate. A trick you may find helpful  is to make a series of vertically drilled holes into the material that will be removed. With a very smal drillbit. Drill as many holes as you can as close together as possible but NOT directly adjacent to the line demarcating what you want to keep, drill close to this line but not on it. Now the material to be removed has been pre-digested a bit and the exacto will have an easier time removing the waste wood. Mark the shank of your drillbit with a piece of adhesive tape corresponding to the depth you want to cut down to and then keep your eye on that tape as you drill. 

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If you intend to pursue this into many more vessels:

consider obtaining various sizes of micro chisels

they come with either palm or straight handles

which one is based on your comfort.

Flexcut , U.J.Ramelson  , Mastercarver  are some manufacturers

of chisels and gouges in a variety of smaller widths. 

They tend to be $25 +/_ $10 each - thus not a frivolous expenditure.

 

For a one off or occasional use.  Xacto and similar have disposable micro blades

that can do the job.  The gouge sizes are limited as a disposable item and

they are probably to be preferred for safe removal of wood volume.

 

In every instance, but especially with Basswood - keep the edges very sharp.

Unless you nick the edge, frequent use of a honing stone is not necessary - if at all.

It is usually sufficient to strop after every few cuts on a piece of scrap leather

that is charged with a fine compound like red rouge - green Al oxide - Flexcut Gold.

They come as sticks and are used like a crayon on the leather.

Wrist rotation should do for stropping a gouge on a flat leather surface, since it is

a pull motion.

Eddie, Canute, jud and 3 others like this

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Hi Chuck,

 

I would suggest the use of sharp gouge and chisels finished off with flexible sanding sticks.  If the deck is low or lacks camber, you can build it up as shown below.  You will find more pictures on carving and working with solid hulls in my Brigantine Newsboy of 1854 build log here at MSW.

 

Regards,

Pete 

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Canute, reklein, Eddie and 12 others like this

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Personal Experience!!  For working on carved hulls you need to buy a carver's glove or at least a heavy knit glove to protect your hands.  Use this to protect the hand that is not holding the tool.  One slip with a sharp chisel and you are on your way to the emergency room.

 

Roger

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Chuck,

All of the foregoing are good suggestions. 've built both the Sultana and the Phantom. I'd like to add a couple of ideas.

 

The carving chisels are good (keep them sharp). The curved ones are especially good for the bow and other curved areas. I also use the #17 and #18 Exacto blades--godd on the bulwarks and deck separation.

 

One thing I find indispensable is a collection of the very inexpensive fingernail filing boards. I use them so much I wear out several on each model. The small tan ones are especially useful; they have two sides with different grits. They are small and slim and fit into tight spaces. The larger ones with several grits in different colors. These can all be found in any drug store in women's grooming section.


Good luck on your modelling endeavors.

Walt

 

Here are ome shots of my Phantom:

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To all

 

Thanks for the info.  

 

I absolutely have the wrong chisels, payday is next week. I will get what is required to keep the tools sharp.

 

I will book mark this section and use the photos to help with rigging.

 

As far as securing goes, I spent a large part of the day trying to find anything to attach to the bottom of the hull so that I could use a vise.  We are moving to Oklahoma City which means that stuff is getting packed or my Commander in Chief tossed stuff out. I did consider sawing a small piece broom handle, but feared that if caught the boss would make me use it.

 

Thanks the advice will be used.

 

ChuckA

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Chuck,

 

When carving the lower hull I secure the hull block to a reference board that provides a common baseline for station/profile templates.  Shaping of decks and bulwarks is performed in a cradle that supports the model with the waterline level.

 

Regards,

Pete 

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All,

 

We have relocated from Hancock, NH to our home in San Diego, CA.  I have also kept busy with my full size 1:1 scale shipbuilding projects.  I am now setting up my shop and hoping to return to modeling in the near future.  First project will be to rig the Brigantine Newsboy 1854 and complete the 14 Gun Brig Fair American circa 1780.

 

Regards,

Pete

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Hi Chuck, as a woodworker in another life my advise is to get your chisels 'scary' sharp and pare down on the work as you sneak up to the line you have marked by grasping the chisel very close to the tip (but keep a safe distance back)- this gives you the best control possible.. Don't hammer the work piece and just sneak up slowly rather than trying to remove large chunks quickly.

jud, mtaylor, Eddie and 3 others like this

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