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Cross section model by Russ 1/48 scale - Finished


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This is a model I posted on a bit on the old site. I am presenting here as a build log of sorts.I built this model back in 2003 as a learning experience. It worked. I learned a lot about how to build a model and also how not to build a model.

 

There are a few things I like about this model as well as a good deal I do not like. One thing I am proud of is that the entire model is treenailed. That was important to me. There are numerous mistakes in the size of timbers, as well as the way they are joined. Still, this model taught me a good deal and it sits on my shelf and it has survived the last ten years quite well.

 

Here is how the model began.

Crosssection1_zps0d71708c.jpg

 

Crosssection2_zps9dee79fb.jpg

 

Crosssection3_zps8009cb92.jpg

 

Crosssection4_zps46836f2a.jpg

 

Note that the framing is all double frames. Also note that the keel and keelson are a tad small, and that the mast step is just plain wrong. It works, but it could have been some much more accurate. On a  positive note, those fillers stiffened the framing well and made it easy to sand it out fair.

 

More later.

 

Questions and comments are welcomed.

 

Russ

 

 

Edited by russ
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Mark:

This is very generic. It is supposed to be a smallish vessel from about the late 18th century. I designed it myself just to get some experience in framing and planking. I designed this model before I really knew very much about how these early ships were built.

 

Russ

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Michael:

This cross section model was what gave me the idea to offer the Triton cross section project since it would provide the beginning builder a feel for built up framing and scratch building in general. Perhaps that idea has caught on in the past several years. :)

 

I used American cherry extensively in this model. It is hard enough, holds an edge, can be worked fairly easily with hand tools or power tools, and I was able to get some heart wood so the color is reasonably deep throughout. I also used boxwood for the outer bulwarks and gratings. It was great to work with. The mast and decking were both Western Alder; very straight grained stuff and good for spars, but a little soft. The hatch coamings were American walnut. The treenails were all bamboo.

 

Russ

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Nice work, Russ.  

 

It seems we are ever learning about the authentic ship building practices, as our interest and our reference materials expand (not to mention MSW itself!!).

 

Our guesses sometimes come back to haunt us, but this is a handsom model, and thanks for sharing it.

 

Ron  

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Ron:

Thanks. You are absolutely right about the learning process. It never ends, even for the most experienced of us (I am far from it). Having a place like MSW makes it soooo much easier than the old days to learn new things.

 

Russ

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Here is a little more progress. The lower deck beams were installed. No camber on these. You can see the support stanchions, some iron ballast down in the hold, as well as a few barrels and spare cordage.

Crosssection9_zps3e2f6a2b.jpg

 

More later.

 

Russ

 

 

 

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Thanks. I recall doing a bit of research on the ballast to get the dimensions of it. The barrels and cordage were probably an effort to make it more realistic. It was interesting work though. The barrels were fun to make. The bands are masking tape painted black as I recall.

 

Russ

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Joe:

Thanks for stopping by. I will have some more porgress in a bit.

 

Bob:

Yes, everything is glued, but it also treenailed. That is something I wanted to do in a model and I can say that the treenailing has made this model a good deal stronger than if it was just glued together.

 

Russ

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Here is the main deck framing. In the first photo, you can see the hanging knees installed. I was very proud of these knees because I had harvested them from my own trees in the front yard. They are maple. However, they should really be placed alongside the beams instead of under the beams.

Crosssection11_zps0adf279f.jpg

 

The main deck beams have about 3" camber on them.

Crosssection12_zps9a095f9f.jpg

 

Russ

 

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Ron:

Thanks. I read about this idea in Charles Davis' The Built Up Ship Model and I thought it would be a fun thing to try. It worked beautifully and over the years I have made a small collection of crooks from other trees that I will eventually use in other models.

 

Russ

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Rocker:

Thanks. I recall it was a cold day, maybe even Christmas Day, that I went out in the afternoon and collected my crooks. I held my poster board template up to each one to see if it was large enough to suit. I recall slabbing them in my 4 inch table saw. I was able to get two knees out of each crook. That was a lot of fun.

 

Russ

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Russ

 

Just came across your build today. Thanks for sharing it and showing me that it will take time and experience to progress to building better models. I myself believe that you learn from the mistakes that you make and will think twice before making it again. I also very much like the idea of showing cargo in the hold. I think it makes the model more authentic looking. That's why I was trying to gather the true dimensions of barrels used on the ships of that period. So I could turn them on my lathe to the scale used. But, that's another story. :D    

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Long9Ron:

Thanks for looking in. This model still appeals to me because of that journey that it took to make it. I learned so much from this model that, even with all the mistakes, I still like it.

 

Rocker:

And to imagine, all this began with a book, a pencil and some vellum, and the desire to learn how to make a built up frame. Hmmm. :)

 

Russ

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I decided to take some close up photos of the finished lower hatch coaming and grating. Good for me, this unit slides right out of the model so we can get a better look at it.

lowerdeckcoamingandgrating_zpse4787f93.j

 

Here is the coaming by itself. It is walnut, it has half lapped joints at the corners, and you can see the support strips for the grating.

lowerdeckcoaming_zpsb1f913a2.jpg

 

And here is the grating. It is boxwood and it was made according to a method I found in Shipmodeler's Shopnotes.

lowerdeckgrating_zps5ef4fce9.jpg

 

Russ

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Here is a look at the model after the main deck was planked. You can see on the outer bulwarks there is a slot for the channels and note the same on the far inner bulwarks for a pin rack. Also note the ladder.  

Crosssection13_zps20617a1b.jpg

 

Here is another look at the deck planking. I had the coamings, shot racks, ladder, and one of the guns installed.

Crosssection14_zps047d9d0c.jpg

 

More on the guns and tackles in a bit.

 

Russ

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