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Spiling planks using clear tape


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I post this for people with experience to give some feedback.  I found that sometimes i could get the spiled part on my first try and sometimes i had to try more than once.  I think I discovered why.  When you put the clear tape with its edge parallel  to the edge of the planking line you will get the correct curve of the plank.  But, if you put the tape at an angle to allow it to lay flat and pretty,  you wont get the correct curvature. you will either have to adjust a lot with sandpaper or repeat the process.  The edge of the tape away from the planks should be a little ¨loose¨ when you put it on the hull.  If that edge is tight, or straight, you wont get the curvature you are looking for.  Can anybody confirm this?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Jaun and Carl,

 

 Would you please  post a few photos illustrating your method? Thanks!

 

BFN

 

Cheers,

Hopeful aka David

 

“there is wisdom in many voices”

 

Completed: Sharpie Schooner (Midwest) Posted in kit build section of forum

Current: Sultana (MSW) Updating the build log and continuing on with the build

 

Next: Lady Nelson (Amati Victory)

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You are correct, Aaron. For planking to look right, it does need to lined out and spiled. I suspect kit manufacturers only provide stripwood because it is easier and cheaper for them. Also, many kit model makers are quite happy to plank a hull in a non-realistic way, so they don't demand sheetwood from the kit manufacturers.

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So if wider sheets of wood are required for spilling, why don't kits come with some sheets? It seems odd to me that they don't. It also seems that for your planking to look good and proper you must use the spilling technique?

 

Aaron

After the "math" is done and max plank widths are determined, I suppose  2 or 3 of the supplied planks could be glued together giving you a wider surface to accommodate the "spiles"........

 

JP

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I've used painters tape 1" wide. I hold on to each end of the piece of tape and apply it making sure it touches middle of the hole first then both ends at the same time. Don't push, just set it over the hole.

Once applied, I use the side of a sharpened carpenters pencil and gently rub the edges of the hole. I sharpen the pencil so the lead is about 1/4 - 3/8 in length.

Remove tape, set on plank, add 1mm cut to shape, sand to fit numerous time until done.

Edited by Billl
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After the "math" is done and max plank widths are determined, I suppose  2 or 3 of the supplied planks could be glued together giving you a wider surface to accommodate the "spiles"........

 

JP

I tried it once and found it does not work well because the glueline is much weaker than the rest of the mateial. I keep a small stock of 0.5mm veneer for spiling. The trouble is veneer is available for a variety of wood but oak veneer is hard to get hold of. I ended up with teak for the spiled strakes and oak for the straight bits

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  • 3 weeks later...

 

In most cases both...but only one drop plank at the bow usually.

 

Chuck

I am building AL's Mayflower. I divided the hull into bands and installed batans on the hull before planking. The batans ran naturally along the hull that ended sharply in the bow. In two bands, the width at the bow is just over two half strack width, with one band its half strack width. I spilled the stracks and install drop planks in the second planking. With two bands, its five stracks into two, with the other its five stracks into one. How can I install only one drop plank at the bow in this case? Have I made a mistake along the way? I have a photo of the hull after the first planking but I do not know how to attach it with the massage

 

Appreciate if you could give me the benefit of your experience.

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Yes I would still only put one.  They will get pretty narrow.  Here is a site that shows teh Mayflower II being planked.  Read through all of the months of construction to see the planking being fixed.  There are some good pictures.   There were no drop planks at all on teh replica.   I would still say its Ok to use one at the bow though.  Directly beneath the wales.

 

http://blogs.plimoth.org/captns-blog/?m=201301

 

 

Chuck

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So if wider sheets of wood are required for spilling, why don't kits come with some sheets? It seems odd to me that they don't. It also seems that for your planking to look good and proper you must use the spilling technique?

 

Aaron

 

I have this frustration myself.  I'm working on the Constructo Mayflower.  Since I will double plank it, I am using a wider walnut strip for spiling the first layer.  However, this isn't going to work for layer 2 due to color differences.  I've searched the web A LOT for bokapi sheets and am coming up dry.  This is my first 'big' wooden ship so my first plank layer is an experiment waiting to be covered!  But with the supplied veneer I don't have the required dimensions for spiling layer 2.

 

As for the clear tape method, for me it has been the best way to do a decent job of curve transfer for spiling.

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  • 3 months later...

Ok I guess I am late to the party on this thread. As many people here know I am deep into the planking on my AL Harvey. I also have already sanded the second layer off and started completely over. I am close to 1/2 way done on this 2nd try and it does look much better and I am learning.

 

Here is the rub. I understand spiling and I think I know how to do it. But as mentioned here it requires planks wider than those provided by the kit. so I assumed this was limited to scratch building and basically I ignored spiling. I focused instead on using the least amount of stealers and no drop planks if possible. So far so good. But I am getting to the point that Chuck very accurately describes in his planking practicum. One edge of the plank does not lay on the bulkhead and you get what he describes as a clinker look.

 

So I am almost completely at a stand still. Is there no way to complete the planking without spiling? This is the 2nd layer and I want it to look good. If I have to, I will order the wood and cut my spiled planks. But how does one do this with the planking supplied with the kit? HELP!

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Unfortunately this is the weakness of kit-supplied planking strips. If you can get a fine-grained veneer from a local source (I assume you don't have the power tools to machine your own plank sheet 'blanks'), you might consider that route.  Spiling is definitely the way to go if you want the nice planking look of scratch-built models.

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Well Druxey, Before I moved I did have full sized tools. But where I live now I don't have the room and I sold them. Now I am limited to what I can cut with a full set of Jim's tools. So I am going to be shopping soon.

 

Just for discussion purposes. If I was willing to accept less that Scratch quality, how do you do it? My problem is that the plank doesn't lay flat. It tends to get a "clinker" look to it.

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