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Boyer 86ft by flying_dutchman2 - FINISHED - Scale 1:48 - 17th Century Dutch Coastal water freighter by Marc Meijer

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After my yacht, Utrecht, I decided to start building several 17th century Dutch merchant ships and the first one is a Boyer. The plans are from Ab Hoving and Cor Emke published by SeaWatchbooks. 

 

The Boyer was a small freighter, often seen in the entire North West European area. In literature it is suggested that the Boyer was developed from another ship, the 'heude', a Southern Dutch inshore vessel, which, in order to be able to sail the higher waves of the open sea (albeit in close vicinity of the coast), was buoyed up (heightened)in the sides; hence its name. 

 

Like every ship type, the Boyer is a compromise, which by its little draught and relatively large loading capacity was able to sail both at sea and on shallow waters. For the former, a deep keel performs best, for the latter the flat bottom. The solution for the Boyer was finally found in the application of leeboards, which came into use in the second half of the 16th century. They lessened the drift, allowing at the same time for a flat bottom. 

 

The Boyer could perform both inshore and close to the coast and was seldom larger than 22 meters. Its characteristics are the round shape with little deadrize and round bilges, upper planking with much tumble-home ending in the helm port transom, a curved stem and a set of heavy wales, emphasizing the handsome sheer. 

 

They sailed close to the coast and could reach cities that were situated relatively far inland, like Berlin, Cologne, Warsaw and Breslau. Wine, fruit, hemp, pitch, tar, wool cloth and spices were the lighter cargos often shipped by boyers.  

 

Note: this is going to be a slow going build as at the same time I am building an 8 sided drainage windmill, scale 1:15. It is a replica of a windmill still in existence. 

 

Thanks for reading. 

Marcus 

Boyer, intro 1.jpg

Boyer, intro 2.jpg

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Ondras71, Mark and Jack, thanks for showing an interest. 

 

This build has the same rigging and sails as the Utrecht plus more. It has a mizzen mast with what looks like a lateen sail and the bow sprit has an added sail too. The stern is a bit pear shaped, similar to a Fluit, just not that extreme. At around 53 cm in length this will be a large model 

Marcus 

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Cut out the bulkheads and starting to put then in a template. Made from 1/2" poplar. Yes, a bit thick, but it is hidden. 

 

Since I joined a woodworkers club, I am getting everybody's cut offs and then some. I received a lot of walnut in small sizes, so the Boyer will get a stem, keel, sternpost and rudder from walnut. Looks pretty good. Also 3 thick wales on each side will be walnut as well. Like the Utrecht, they will be laminated to get the thickness. I have succes with bending this wood. 

Marcus 

Boyer, Bulkheads.jpg

Boyer, bulkheads cut out .jpg

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Hello Marcus,

 

It's good to see that you are building this vessel, I am building the wijdschip out of the same book.

This because at the start of the chapter of this book you see that this vessel is sailing past the town I live nowadays (Hoorn) and the trade I am working in (Inland shipping over the dutch- and belgian waterways).

In my opinion I am not good enough to show my progress at this forum.

 

If you are searching for more building plans of dutch vessels mabye you can use the site of the NVM (www.modelbouwtekeningen.nl).

This is a dutch society/club of model builders in which a lot of model ship builders find there way.

Cor Emke, one of the co-writers of this book, made a lot of building plans for this society and you can find them there.

 

Good luck and I like to follow your building progress of this vessel.

 

Regards,

 

Hans Peters.

Hoorn (NL)

 

 

 

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Jan:

Yes, interesting to say the least. As you said, not much information on these boats. Ever since I got the book and plans I have been studying these ships and this one is very different. I also like that it is going to be a large model. 

 

Hans Peters:

Thanks for the interest. You need to put your wijdschip build on MSW. Doesn't matter if you are a beginner. We all started somewhere (gewoon doen). Furthermore, it is another ship I want to build and want to see your progress. 

 

With your trade in inland shipping you have an understanding of these ships. 

 

I know of NVM. I had a subscription on their magazine when I lived in Amsterdam. They have excellent plans. I'll check them out again. What is available in Europe is not always available in the US. I was very excited when SeaWatchbooks published the 17th century Dutch merchant ships. 

Marcus 

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Set out the bulkheads and used spacers in between them. This whole setup is going to be glued together and the empty areas will be filled up with balsa. 

Compared to the Utrecht, this process has taken me about a days work. The Utrecht took weeks and I also didn't know what I was doing. 

Marcus 

 

Boyer, bulkheads distanced .jpg

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Glued the bulkheads and spaces together. The boat is in three pieces and once dry, I will glue the whole thing together.

 

My woodworkers club has a free bee table. This is where members put stuff on which they no longer want and this month I took about 200 pieces of 12" x 1 x "1/4" cherry. Some have been used as spacers and the rest I will cut into planks of 1/16".

 

Marcus 

Boyer, glue bulkheads with spacers .jpg

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I'm in Marcus, a little late and I hope there is a seat available. Great start and a very nice ship tp model. I have the drawing set too, so many to choose from and so little time to do them all.

 

Cheers,

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Welcome Piet and yes I saved a seat for you. Correct, so many ships. I plan to do all the scale 1:48 first and then a Fluit. I also have that book, Valkenisse, Retourschip 1717 with plans but without plans for masts, sails and rigging. This I need to research as I want to build her complete. 

Marcus 

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Glued it all together and made a template of the height of the railing and little cut outs that will tell me the height of the deck. 

Next I need to sand the form and also use a dremel with a carving wheel to remove the excess wood as the deck is a bit too high. 

The bow is similar to a yacht, which is bluff, the stern is pointed at the end and haven't figured out how I am going to create this so the rudder and rudder post fit accordingly. 

 

Compared to the Utrecht,  which had 13 sheets of plans the Boyer has 3. So for me as a beginner scratch builder their is a lot of unknowns. The Utrecht had a sheet with the outline of the deck only. The Boyer does not have that so I guess I need to look at the top view of the deck plan that has all the deck items on it and look at the outer edge of the boat. 

In the end I will figure it out. 

Also, very little information of these boats on the Net or books. 

Marcus 

Boyer 86ft, with template .jpg

Boyer, skeleton .jpg

Boyer, stern.jpg

Boyer, bow .jpg

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You are having your running shoes on, Marcus. Glad to be driving so I can catch up ;) I must be the last of the Dutch community to hop on ...

 

Two builds none the less ... an interesting vessel, and it's odd to see the book published in the US whilst the authors are both Dutch ...

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Carl, there is always room and better late than never. The Dutch community is small but very active. 

I have wanted to do the Boyer since last year so I planned for it and then my wife wanted me to do the mill so I thought I can do both. Like I said before, both will be slow as I also have the garden and that includes the food. I am retired and that helps. It is not all play (boat and mill), there is house work and errands, etc. 

 

I thought it rather odd that when I saw this book and plans figuring it would sell better in the Netherlands and the rest of Europe and not here. Oh well. 

The Boyer is a challenge and the mast at the stern is held by a heavy board, it does not go into the hull.  I would think with a good Dutch wind it would break off. The pointy stern is going to be fun, sort of.  It is a bummer that there isn't more information on this boat. If it is worth to be one of the 17th century Dutch merchant ships you would think there is more information on this boat. 

Marcus 

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We asked Ab in an other forum. He didn't had any intention to publish this book. It was done on request of seawarch, who specializes in interesting books with drawing for modellers. No market for that over here. Unfortunatedly, impoting books from the other side is a bit expensive.

 

with respect to all of these ships: there are almost no written sources, so these drawings are kind of reconstructions, starting from the few written sources there are (like builders ontracts), and art- drawings and paintings. 

 

That is also the reason that these drawings are more schematic than those of the statenjacht (and some earlier drawings of Emke). They are not intended as fully detailed drawings, but as a reaonably good starting point to build these ships: it is a drawing of a ship-type, not of a specific vessel.

 

That said: ask all your questions, we might have an anser for that.

 

 

The aft mast for instance, was in many case only rigged at low wind, to hold course, or even (especially fishing ships), to keep position when the main mast was lowered. So, at a fair wind, it was either not rigged, or had small sailsl. You can see that in many paintings of a related shiptype: the hoeker.

 

a famous drawing of the ship is this one by Reinier Nooms

https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/nl/collectie/RP-P-OB-20.523

 

 

Jan

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# Carl, thanks for the suggestion. 

 

# Jan, thank you for the elaborate explanation. That picture in the Rijks is also in the book. I will ask the questions as you are answering them as I built. The plans itself is an interpretation of a contract in Witsen's book and Ab mentions the pages as well.

Ab has translated this book in English and it is more than $100.00. So I have to save some money and need to get this. 

Marcus 

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Going to be interesting. I am not very familiar with the 17th century, as I am more into the 19th century. It is interesting to see how either a type evolved over time or how a denomination shifted from one type to another. In any case, the boeiers of the 19th century look rather different from those of the 17th century and also have a different purpose, being either a short-distance private conveyance or pleasure boat (equivalent to a horse-drawn carriage in less waterlogged parts of the world), rather than being a freight ship.

 

I always found these Dutch boats somewhat bizarre and ungainly - but got to love them during my years in Noord-Holland ...

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Took a break from the mill and worked on the Boyer. It is version two. 

Couple of weeks ago I sanded too much on the stern. Tried to build it up with wood filler and sand it again but it just didn't look right and the extreme curve at the Stern didn't come out correctly. 

So cut new frames and build it up with Balsa. All the curves are there and it flows evenly. 

 

When I build my first scratch, the Utrecht, I got it correct after version 3. Now I am working on my second scratch and got it right after version 2. If logic is correct my third scratch should be correct with version 1.

Marcus 

Boyer, POB, frames 1 vs2.jpg

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Sanded the hull. It is starting to form like the plan. Added wood filler in areas to build it up and will sand it once it is dry. 

Started working on a template that will be the bow. The bow from the Boyer has a much tighter curve than the bow from the Utrecht, so this will be a serious challenge to curve the 1st and 2nd layer of planking. 

I saw several pictures on the Net of this model and both the bow and the stern look a bit like a fluit. Meaning that they are both built up. 

Marcus 

Boyer 86ft, shaping hull 1.jpg

Boyer 86ft, shaping hull 2.jpg

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