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Hi,

I print flags on the Japanese rice paper.
Rice paper is fastened with adhesive tape to a sheet of plain paper and I printed on an inkjet printer.

Flag patterns and their placement on the ships are here:

http://flagspot.net/flags/index.html

http://www.modelships.de/Flaggen-Beispiele.htm

 

Tadeusz

 

My models:

From kits

Vasa, HMS Victory, Le Solei Royale, Friesland

From scratch

HMS Warrior 1860, Esplanade, Grosse Yacht

Norman’s ship, HMS Speedy, La Royale

Peter von Danzig

Polacca XVII cent.

Current project:

SS Savannah 1818

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post-8878-0-62249700-1420521251_thumb.jpg

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I print them on regular printer paper and then over-coat them with flat clear to protect the ink from moisture. It takes a few tries to get the two sides of the paper registered but the results are worth it. I find the flags look better folded to represent light winds than they do when "flying". I see my avatar is the same image, but the only one I have in larger format online is a mix of two photos (same model).

 

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Edited by HSM
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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

You should be able to fold a flag made from printer paper pretty convincingly.  I usually print on one side then put the part over a light source and trace the image through on the reverse. Then paint with gouache paint which has extremely opaque color and very matt finish. 

 

Then start at the bottom corner of the flag at a 45% angle and roll around a piece of dowel about 1/4" or less depending on how tight you want the folds. Go halfway up the flag then flip over and start at the opposite top corner until you meet in the middle. 

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I used Jay's process when making my replacement flags for the Connie. They worked really well. I printed them on the transfer paper then ironed them to the lightest cotton I could get. Worked like a charm! Once they were made, I soaked them in a thinned mix of PVA glue and dried them on aluminum foil shaped in the waving pattern I was looking for.

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I might add something that could be useful to others.

There is a website that shows lots of details of flags from all around the world. 

http://www.crwflags.com/fotw/flags/index.html

 

At the time I experimented with making flags I used a couple of the pictures. To do that I asked permission from the director Mr. Rob Raeside, explaining that this was strictly for the use of making flags for ship modeling. He sent me an email allowing me to copy his images for this purpose. I am sure that permission still stands, so, go at it with that understanding.

 

I also want to caution you if you decide to add a flag (especially the US flag). Make sure you use one that is from the period that represents your model. In other words, don't use the one we now have. I used the image that has 38 stars.

Edited by Modeler12
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The website I mentioned above also has lots of interesting information. Here is an example when I brought up information about Dutch flags, an unusual way to honor your kids when they graduate.

nl-gradu.gifMark Sensen, 22 February 1998

In May and June you can tell which families have students who have graduated. Outside the house the flag is put out, with the school bag at the top of the staff. 
Mark Sensen, 22 February 1998

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I printed mine using an inkjet printer on just plain copy paper. It was a double image, that is the flag had two halves or mirror copies. Once printed, I trimmed the flag and folded the paper then I used a glue stick to bond everything together. From there I just kept working it until I got the desired form I wanted.

 

These photos are about 5 years apart and though the background color is different (the gray background is more recent) the color of the flag has held up pretty well.

 

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Edited by Don9of11
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Nice job, Don. And it is good to know that it has held up well for you.
I assume that you made the adjustments before the glue stick kicked in. The waves look real.

The fifteen stars would indicate that your model is from the time that a couple more states were added (1795 - 1818). The fifteen stripes were also something new.

http://www.crwflags.com/fotw/flags/us-1795.html

 

I also like the thought that there are more than one way to skin a flag.

 

I recall there was also a good discussion here about the way or direction the flag should fly, depending on wind direction, speed, etc. 

Edited by Modeler12
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I recall there was also a good discussion here about the way the flag should fly, depending on wind direction, etc.

 

 

Yeah, how many times have you seen a model with full sails and the flags are flying toward the stern? They should be flying toward the bow if the wind is coming from behind.

 

All bets are off if the model is shown at anchor - the wind could be coming from any direction.

 

:cheers:  Danny

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Nice job, Don. And it is good to know that it has held up well for you.

I assume that you made the adjustments before the glue stick kicked in. The waves look real.

The fifteen stars would indicate that your model is from the time that a couple more states were added (1795 - 1818). The fifteen stripes were also something new.

http://www.crwflags.com/fotw/flags/us-1795.html

 

I also like the thought that there are more than one way to skin a flag.

 

I recall there was also a good discussion here about the way or direction the flag should fly, depending on wind direction, speed, etc. 

 

You're right. I found that getting the edges of the flag lined up and making sure the stripes and stars were in the same position was critical before the glue set up. The glue also provided a bit of moister in the paper that made working the flag a little easier. I researched carefully the era of my ship build, the Lucky Little Enterprise circa 1799, and made sure I had the right number of stars and stripes. I used different size dowel rods and following Chuck Passaro's advice, tried to get really aggressive with it. I tried a couple of different "wave patterns until I settled in on one that I really liked. It all boils down to being patient, deliberate and no fear.

 

Here is another photo from my work-in-progress collection.

 

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Right on Don.

Here is another example of why it is important to keep the history and time frame of flags in mind.

For my next project I am going to build a small ship that was captured by the British from the French in 1776. 

Even the British flags were different then from the current one. This could have been overlooked very easily.
 

From the way I read the information, the flag could either have a red or white background, but the diagonal red cross came into being in 1801 with the start of the United Kingdom. It represents the addition of Scotland. But that was not the case in 1776.

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Thanks modeler 12.

I wasn't aware of that fact. After doing more research on the net you are correct about the flag, but it was Ireland not Scotland that was missing. Thanks for pointing this out to me. This Union Jack was Australia's first flag, in1801, it was changed to our present day Union Jack.

I'm building HMS ENDEAVOUR

Greg

Edited by Greg the peg leg sailor
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