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Just a head's up for people like me that have been looking for it for some time. Google Books now has a copy of Steel's Elements and Practice of Naval Architecture available. I don't have a link as I stumbled on it during lunch at work the other day. However, I found it easily with an advanced search. It does not have the plates of ship plans but seems to be otherwise complete. In particular it has the tables of scantlings and body data for all the various sizes of ships.

 

Hoss

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7 minutes ago, smatsik said:

Just a head's up for people like me that have been looking for it for some time. Google Books now has a copy of Steel's Elements and Practice of Naval Architecture available. I don't have a link as I stumbled on it during lunch at work the other day. However, I found it easily with an advanced search. It does not have the plates of ship plans but seems to be otherwise complete. In particular it has the tables of scantlings and body data for all the various sizes of ships.

 

Hoss

 

Very nice find!  Here is the link (note it is the 1812 edition)

 

Steel, David. 1812. The Elements and Practice of Naval Architecture; Or: A Treatise on Ship-Building, Theoretical and Practical, on the Best Principles Established in Great Britain. With Copious Tables of Dimensions, &c. Illustrated with a Series of Thirty-Nine Large Draughts, ... Steel and Company. https://books.google.com/books?id=TWsmw-QqvmAC
 
 
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Hi all,

 

New to the forum. I have a copy of the 3rd edition of Steel's Elements and Practice of Naval Architecture dated 1822 that I borrowed and copied from a major library. They actually sent it thru the mail and it was so fragile and worn I was terrifed to even open it.  Anyway it is almost identical to the 1805 version with the exception af an appendix on "Constructing the Royal and Mercantile Navies" by John Knowles. It is different from the 2nd edition dated 1812 in that it does not include a reference to the 39th draught on the "fitting of the stroreroom between the gun deck and Orlop". Does anyone have a copy of this 39th draught they'd be willing to share? I have been unable to find the 1812 edition on sale anywhere that also includes this 39th draught. Any help is appreciated.

 

Dan Kosko

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The issue of what constitutes the Steel reprints is confusing and complicated.  In Nautical Research Journal Vol 52 #4, pages 213 to 220 is an article by Loyd M. Mahoney that makes a very extensive comparison.  It has too many comments and cannot be easily taken out of context.  The caveat is to use primary sources as much as possible, but good reprints cost far less and if carefully reprinted are valuable to us for the information.

 

Regard plate 39, I have it in my reprint (Ed. W. Sweetman, reprinted 1983 from the 1932 edition) of the 1974 original.  This was 'arranged, with an introduction, by Claude S. Gill'.  Plate 39 shows images of 5 sails - jib, mizzen, fore, main, and foresail.  (The fore and main are sprit sails.)   The obverse shows plate 38 with 6 sails - sky scrapers, settee, lateen, sliding gunter, shoulder of mutton and lug sail.  

 

Here are digital photos of the 2 plates - the first is 38, the second is 39.  The quality is fair as the book images are fair.      Hope this helps.           Duff

SAM_2928.JPG

SAM_2929.JPG

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Duff,

 

Thx very much for the info but I think you grabbed the wrong book. The Draught # 39 that I am referring to is in Steels "Naval Architecture", not his "Elements of Mastmaking, Sailmaking and Rigging". I apologize if my text was confusing. The draught #39 I am referencing would be a very large print approximately 24"x30" and shows "fitting of the stroreroom between the gun deck and Orlop".  I have the Sweetman edition you show and the mast and Spar diagrams in the back pocket are absolutely wonderful. I am SUPER interested in how they constructed "made" masts and would love to see a video of one or some 3 dimensional diagrams that help show better the scarfing and how the various pieces butt and fit together. The Steel diagrams are wonderfully detailed but I still have a problem getting my head around how the various head and ends of the various pieces fit together, especially for masts made of 7 pieces or more. I think its one of the areas that are totally missing from the hobby, obviously because at our scale it would be almost impossible to model correctly.

 

For any others interested in this topic ("Made" masts and spars), two of the best references I have found on the subject are "The Masting of American Merchant Sail in the 1850's" by William Crothers and "A Treatise on Masting Ships and Mast Making" by John Fincham. Crothers has some of the best explanations  I've seen on made masts consisting of anywhere from 5 to 16 "sticks". Fincham duplicates alot of Steel's info but does add some interesting narrative of his own.  These two volumes along with Steel's pretty much cover all there is to know about "made" masts and spars.

 

Thx again for the info

 

Dan

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Now it makes sense, Dan.  Unfortunately I do not own the 'Naval Architecture' book.  Hopefully, you will find the image.

 

Mast makers were the highest paid builders in the shipyard, just look at how complicated made masts were.  It would be interesting to see a model of a lower mast but with so many other worthwhile projects to do, who would have the time to make one?

 

Keep building and above all, have fun.                        Duff

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Um, the reason why you are getting no response to your request is that there is no Plate 39! In my edition of Naval Architecture of 1805, at least, there are only 38 plates. Perhaps the reference is either wrong or refers to a different plate number, edition or book.

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Not sure if this helps, but here is the cover for the 1812 edition -

 

steel1812.thumb.jpg.5e9413030dffdb12d922674b7669d728.jpg

 

Note that there are 39 draughts claimed on the title page.

 

The on-line (pdf) version does not include any draughts, but does offer the following TOC listing the draughts.

 

5956ef7fa701e_Steel1812TOC.thumb.jpg.e06d9ab4c6958aa0b0d7334f5ec20924.jpg

   
   
   
   
   
   
     
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
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