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Soup591

New Bedford Whaleboat by Soup591 - Model Shipways - 1:16 - First build

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Hi all - I received my tool kit, glue and my model kit today. Although actual building may not start for a few days, i wanted to start my build log and post a few pictures of my current toolkit and ask a few questions. 

Here are a few questions I have before digging in, with a statement about what i got in the mail first:

 

 I had an issue with shipping on my original order ( see my member introduction post for more on this ). Long story short, i have a claim in with the post office for a lost 18th century longboat kit originally ordered. The tools i ordered may not be the ones i originally wanted, because amazon gave me an allowance to spend on AMAZON SOLD AND SHIPPED ITEMS ONLY. So my buying options for tools were limited. Unfortunate. 

1) Will this glue work for the model kit? I haven't seen anyone use it, and im doubtful because it "remains flexible". It is a craft glue, but seems to be more for fabrics. Anyone with experience? I have no issue getting the right glue, i only ordered this because of my limited buying options ( see above).

2) I will be doing a full inventory on the kit soon, but one thing i noticed is that some of the metal parts were out of the clear shipping tube upon arrival and bent quite a bit. None were broken. Is this cause for concern? Wondering if I may run into issues because of this down the line.

3) Is there anything missing that is truly vital from the tools in the pictures I posted? I know i may need some higher grit files or sand paper, but the kit was described as a model railroad tool kit. Again, limited buying options due to amazon allowance from shipping issues.

PHEW that was a lot. Sorry for the novel, i plan on keeping my posts from here on out lighter and to the point!! Thanks in advance,

Ryan (Soup591)

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I've heard that this kit is no piece of cake, but I've seen at least one spectacular finished example of it.

 

I started out with the model railroad tool kit as well -- just seemed to have more of the tools I thought I would need than the actual ship modeling tool kit. Start with what you have -- you will inevitably discover additional tools you'll want later. Your glue looks more like the kind that is appropriate for card modeling. For wood, I would suggest regular Titebond or other wood glue instead. It's readily available at any hardware store.

 

Good luck with your project!

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1 hour ago, ccoyle said:

I've heard that this kit is no piece of cake, but I've seen at least one spectacular finished example of it.

 

I started out with the model railroad tool kit as well -- just seemed to have more of the tools I thought I would need than the actual ship modeling tool kit. Start with what you have -- you will inevitably discover additional tools you'll want later. Your glue looks more like the kind that is appropriate for card modeling. For wood, I would suggest regular Titebond or other wood glue instead. It's readily available at any hardware store.

 

Good luck with your project!

Thanks ccoyle, I will be sure to get some actual wood glue for this project, probably Titebond. And you have a good point, I will definitely find out what I need throughout the process. No rush! I will do my best to take my time and learn from my inevitable mistakes.

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I'll go along with what Chris said and add "buy what you need, when you need it" as this is a first model.   

 

I do have one suggestion though.  Go to a local beauty supply house and look at their disposable nail files and foam sanding blocks (blocks of foam covered in sandpaper. They come in assorted grits and are relatively cheap.   But the "buy what you need" still applies and I should know that because when I discovered these standing strips, I bought a lot of them and still have way more than I'll ever use in my tool chest.

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Mtaylor, thats a really good idea. I'll stop and pick some up soon.

The inventory process is done with no missing parts. I'll be moving on to reading the instruction book next. It's a lengthy one.

Edited by Soup591

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I was able to get a little time today to open the kit and get going. 

 

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Basic picture of the profile mold with char marks before removing it from the sheet.20180914_055025.thumb.jpg.0a2f0c8cfabb16f98b8a4c5c9943ffc1.jpg

Here are some of the frame pieces still in their sheet.20180914_111618.thumb.jpg.a78fb9e39461407d503449b0d3930113.jpg

This picture shows the first issue I ran into. The center slot is deeper than it should be. When dry fitted to the profile mold, it doesn't sit properly (see below). I will have to shim this I assume. Any recommendations on that process are appreciated!20180914_123645.thumb.jpg.8a5d51f22dc6b30baf4209611fce065e.jpg

Picture to go along with above statement. See the 4th waterline mark and how far off it is. This is also pre sanding.20180914_122541.thumb.jpg.3a5d7fec72b0bc6e1384ff91dd745e2c.jpg

A picture of the required bevel on the bow of the profile mold. The stern was done the same. Still needs some finishing touches.

That is all for now. Like i said, being my first model ship period any and all recommendations or criticism are welcome. Hope to have more updates soon. Thanks in advance !

Ryan

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3 minutes ago, John Cheevers said:

My only comment is: Throw that bottle of craft bond away and get a bottle of Titebond wood glue. After that, go have yourself a great time building this kit!

 

No worries i definitely wont be using it! And thank you.

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Indeed, a shim is needed.   Read far enough ahead so that you understand the process and the settings for the rest of the bulkheads.   Hold off gluing them until the rest have been fitted to make sure that everything is as it should be.   I hope you're enjoying the process.

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2 hours ago, mtaylor said:

Indeed, a shim is needed.   Read far enough ahead so that you understand the process and the settings for the rest of the bulkheads.   Hold off gluing them until the rest have been fitted to make sure that everything is as it should be.   I hope you're enjoying the process.

Its awesome so far! Its nice being presented with issues and being a bit on your own without direct step by step instructions, stimulates the mind 🤣. But seriously i am having a blast. Picked up some glue and am ready to continue on tomorrow. Thanks for all the replies everyone!!

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Ok guys this will be a long one, a LOT was done today 😁.

First is a picture of the "shimmed" number 3 mold that i had issues with. It worked out perfectly fine and fit great.20180915_072053.thumb.jpg.7420e1cbcea074eeea241731394e42d2.jpg

The cap strip was soaked and held in place along the profile mold to dry and take shape.20180915_083738.thumb.jpg.07595567de46c2fb69b6bd624baa3a0f.jpg

A picture of the hull mold after all cap strips were glued and nailed into place.20180915_142153.thumb.jpg.5e1c6b1bec47eebce63064572553a9ac.jpg

Looking down the newly constructed hull mold.20180915_142301.thumb.jpg.fe92344c2982d48307b4d83befeb1343.jpg

A picture of the hull mold dry mounted on horses. The cap strips are "spot glued" in pictures after this for easy removal after the planking process. Note the notch at the front of the cap strip, more on that in a minute!!20180915_193947.thumb.jpg.e7050aef349f133426ca79d4edf2f476.jpg

The notch at the bow and stern are for the stem / stern posts and the lamination process of those. A wedge is used to keep pressure on the layered posts while the glue is drying.20180915_202044.thumb.jpg.24da8b3657c3d7e67864f974e3a0013c.jpg

Letting the three layers of the stem post dry after the wetting/shaping process. Note the wedge being used.20180915_205540.thumb.jpg.c69e6f2e658d8fda9ca8cb6ed43eac58.jpg

And lastly is the glued and wedged stem post. Following the instructions, the metal clips were made. Instead of using scrap wood, i decided to use a few small craft clothespins as wedges that i had handy. Worked out great.20180915_214531.thumb.jpg.fe79a1b2d463987852abea2645219b27.jpg

Sorry there are not too many pictures following the entire process. There were a few issues i ran into that i was able to correct with little issue. One was that i discovered one of the molds (early on before the cap strips were glued into place) was not square. I ended up soaking the glued mold with water and was able to wiggle it free re-position/glue it. Secondly, during the process of setting up the horses to mount the hull frame on, i noticed i had trimmed just a little too much off of the bow and stern horses, so shims were used. Following the instructions, the horse alignment/fitment was not important to be perfectly shaped/square. Guess i was a little too careless! Either way, the stem and stern post laminations are drying and i should be able to start beveling the posts tomorrow to accept the keel. Having an absolute blast so far!

-Ryan

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I feel like i did a whole lot, but i guess when it comes down to it its not actually that much work!! Anyways..20180916_231944.thumb.jpg.e93edc8ce8eb1d12505b007af2f0ffe4.jpgThe upper and lower levels of the keel is set to dry. Following instructions, they are clipped and wedged to the hull mold.20180916_231949.thumb.jpg.c1f8d0436007c0ab84aafa3460219826.jpgA closeup of the cutout on the lower keel. The upper keel is left uncut for structural rigidity purposes at this time.20180916_232209.thumb.jpg.fc91690c0836c99654b4e8bf68ff221b.jpgA closeup of the complex union of keel and stem post. This is before sanding and continuation of the rabbet along the length of the keel. Also, this is before the second 3 laminations of the stem post are added (they meet the lower keel section).20180917_164053.thumb.jpg.ef06a82653cbfea7590cf28461f8141f.jpgHere is the last 3 laminations of the stem post. The rabbet now has to be extended the length of the keel and blended through the scarf. This was tricky!20180917_184923.thumb.jpg.7e3714b6b36f2224de1be0c15bf39baa.jpgAfter lots of sanding and measuring, the garboards were added.20180917_214713.thumb.jpg.009ff24bbec923080c588ecc0285633c.jpgHere is the second strake being clamped while the glue is drying. This step was also tricky because you need to keep a 1/32 gap between the second strake and the profile molds to allow room for the batten seam.20180917_225748.thumb.jpg.5c0b9738d66866841bf62854f6a3e6f2.jpgAnd this is how she sits tonight, the second strake glued and drying overnight.

Hoping to have another update tomorrow before i take a few day break!

-Ryan

 

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Had a little bit of time today to add the third strake to my whaleboat. I am doing my best to make sure that each additional strake and batten seam is where it is supposed to be following the plans. I wont be able to do any work in the next few days so I figured i would post with a full update.20180918_103003.thumb.jpg.0f1028833e1dc6b0ea9f1eff0fb9943e.jpgOne side has the third strake glued and unclamped, the other side is glued and clamped.20180918_102928.thumb.jpg.7a68eedac25d2ce640ce2b5ac420ae74.jpgA view showing (hopefully) symmetry between port and starboard garboard/strakes so far.20180918_102936.thumb.jpg.63ca102255897b160bdd89c718c9c554.jpgAnother view during the gluing process.20180918_101028.thumb.jpg.f8bd15f27818eddabe3f5d8ec113518f.jpgA view before the third strake was added showing the batten seam in place. Also note the 1/32" sections of basswood clamped temporarily that I used to place under the third strake. This is done for ease of installing the batten seam after the strake is installed.

Now that the hull is coming together, im getting even more excited about this build. I hope to finish planking and start some internal framework relatively soon!!

Ryan

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I am enjoying this build as I start my first whalers. I have eight little whalers and having this same kit on my shelf gives an incredible amount of information through the plans. I hope to build this next year.  I look forward to seeing you work through the issues

Cheers

Jon

 

 

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Thank Jond, i guess i need to figure out the format for posting with descriptions of the pictures first. For some reason, on my phone the format was fine but it looks way off on my pc.  I'll try to get the text so it doesn't end up on the side of photos the next time around! 

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Hey everyone!

It has been a few days since i havhave had any updates, and i haven't had much time to do too much work so i will post what I have for now...

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The first picture is one of the 5th strakes being clamped so that it follows the profile mold curvature and is "cupped". 

Next is a picture looking down the hull at the strakes, and waiting on number 5 to dry.

Third is an overhead view of the progress and where i am currently.

Lastly, a close up of one of the better sections showing tight plank installation.

I ran into an issue where the strakes were not lining up port to starboard when viewed at from head on. I corrected this by simply sanding down more on one side to get a slightly thinner strake, and sanding less on the other side to get the planks to line up( this was recommended in the instructions, and the difference was not big at all, MAYBE 1/32nd max). Either way, cruising along and hope to have the planking done by the end of the weekend. Hope everyone is enjoying the build so far!! 

Ryan

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Thanks DanO and thanks for whoever took the time to view and like the pictures. Appreciate it! Another small update because im feeling pretty accomplished today. I finally removed the hull from the horses and it felt great. Although i ran into a few minor issues i think the end result after my first ever planking job came out ok!! 20180923_173415.thumb.jpg.52c5781b4348b35d5779b02219be7cf9.jpg20180923_173502.thumb.jpg.764dd3b404b061ec1ce8f64ede031a9d.jpg20180923_173649.thumb.jpg.6cf036bb3b2bd5ac1f029523492edb4f.jpg20180923_173709.thumb.jpg.abc5925c55c1cc6e7c7600205a50dad0.jpg

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Great work so far!  After 5 years working on a scratch built coastal coal schooner (Howard W. Middleton) I am literally hours away from placing the glass case over the model - sometime next week.  Time to think about my next build and this model has caught my eye as I need something that may take a bit less time but holds some interest and challenge.  I never had a chance to go to the New Bedford Whaling Museum but I am sure it would be a great way to get some background on this boat.  However, I did meet Erik Ronnberg years ago and have followed much of his work so I am sure this model is as good as it gets.  Good luck with your ongoing project and I look forward to following the build.

 

Regards
Larry

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Hello Ryan,

 

that looks great! I bought the book to the kit several years ago... And due to my 1/64 AGATE project I'm looking for building solutions for whaleboats - but it looks like I'll need some electronic microscope at 1/4 of your size.

So hopefully I could encourage you to show us some progress.

 

Whaleboats are such beautyfull pices of craftmanship and seafarers experience. And without without some very few examples the allvanished away with declining of the fair play whailing (half the sighted whales escaped). The were substituted by steam whaling cutters, sonar and the ugly whaling factory ships.

 

So carry on and keep building! 

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